#1
Basically my question is does a gallop need to be D-D-U, or is it fine if I play it D-U-D? I've heard some people say it's played the first way, but that just seems needlessly difficult.

Also, what is a reverse gallop? I saw someone refer to the gallop in Slayer's Raining Blood as a reverse gallop, but I don't know what the difference is. Thanks.
#2
You can play whatever you're playing however way you want. Different galloping sections are played in all different ways. There is no set in stone way to gallop, nor is anything in guitar set in stone. You play the way that best caters to the sound you want to achieve.
As for Raining Blood, the main galloping section is just played D-U-D. It's a very basic gallop. You don't get any more basic than that. For me I always found Brendon Small's work in Dethklok great for galloping.



Brendon Small in general is an exceptional "thrash" like guitarist.

Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 11, 2015,
#3
Quote by vayne92
You can play whatever you're playing however way you want. Different galloping sections are played in all different ways. There is no set in stone way to gallop, nor is anything in guitar set in stone. You play the way that best caters to the sound you want to achieve.
As for Raining Blood, the main galloping section is just played D-U-D. It's a very basic gallop. You don't get any more basic than that. For me I always found Brendon Small's work in Dethklok great for galloping.



Brendon Small in general is an exceptional "thrash" like guitarist.



I might just use that Brendon Small exercise to work on my galloping, thanks. One last question though, how is the galloping in Metallica's battery done? Just love the sound of the gallop in the song in particular.
#4
It has to do with the guitar tone as much as with the technique. Scoop the mids and go crazy!

Whenever I gallop, I use D-U-D D-U-D. It gives me the most rhythmic control and it sounds best, I think.
I make backing tracks for bass and guitar players. Check 'em out here.
#5


The original gallop comes from the unmatched sound of a horse running by. Therefore, the first in my picture. The second is the famous raining blood-like reverse gallop. Called reverse, because the hard accent is on the sixteenth notes instead of the eighth.

The "rules" for how to play those come from the "easiest" or most "natural" ways to play them. Metallica's Battery is a simple gallop with chords thrown in.

Most of the time the tempo is responsible for how to play a certain figure. A very fast reverse gallop is quite impossible to play DDU, while a slow (reverse) gallop could also be played DDD or UUU. In the end it's always about the song and the best way is the way that lets your technique sound most accurate and clean (not as in overdrive, duh).


edit: seems like the picture got a little big here
Last edited by DeathMetal616 at Apr 11, 2015,
#7
Quote by DeathMetal616


The original gallop comes from the unmatched sound of a horse running by. Therefore, the first in my picture. The second is the famous raining blood-like reverse gallop. Called reverse, because the hard accent is on the sixteenth notes instead of the eighth.

The "rules" for how to play those come from the "easiest" or most "natural" ways to play them. Metallica's Battery is a simple gallop with chords thrown in.

Most of the time the tempo is responsible for how to play a certain figure. A very fast reverse gallop is quite impossible to play DDU, while a slow (reverse) gallop could also be played DDD or UUU. In the end it's always about the song and the best way is the way that lets your technique sound most accurate and clean (not as in overdrive, duh).


edit: seems like the picture got a little big here


Right that pretty much answers all of my questions, thanks!


Quote by vayne92
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