#1
Hey guys, just a quick question here. Whenever I'm playing with my Gibson Les Paul on a distorted channel it seems like the lower strings completely overpower the higher strings even if I put a compressor on (I'm going through an eleven rack) and I figured I'd ask if anyone here has any ideas why that might be. It's pretty annoying, because a lot of the chords I play have some kind of tension on the high string that is pretty much inaudible.
#2
it could be a number of things

your eq could have too much bass(not enought treble)
the general muddiness of the les paul
pick up too close to the strings on the bass side
your technique
other settings on the 11 rack ?

i would try to back up on the bass knob in your eq
#3
Well, it could be a few things, but most probably your pickups and the distortion settings eq are the cause of the low end drowning out the high end. Play with the eq on your eleven rack and try to make sure to bring in a descent amount of mids, while keeping the low end around the middle of the knob. As far as pickups, there are plenty out there now that claim to give you full, clear voicings across all strings, my favorite being bareknuckle pickups. Hope this helps!
#5
Check you pickup heights, they should be fractionally lower on the bass side. The bass strings move more and get closer to the pickup.

Also check you have enough mids, overly scooped kills your place in the mix as well as a lot of your higher notes. And make sure the bass isn't all the way up, and your tone control isn't rolled off.

Which pickups are you using?
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#6
i am agreeing with the people that are saying it could easily be your pickup height. it takes two minutes and a screwdriver, i would start with that. then i would look into the EQ.
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#7
In addition to what's already been suggested, back off the saturation a little and probably the gain too. The combination of too much bass, bass end of pickups too close and too much gain and saturation is probably causing your sound to turn to mud.

You can have heavy bass, and still sound good, I've done it for many years but you can't crank the gain and saturation up, it both gets muddy and overpowers everything else. Too much treble is piercing, most people won't do that very long. Also keep in mind mids accent the bass as well. I had a similar problem using pedals and a tube amp until I realized I was cranking the gain up too much on the distortion pedal. I started to back off both gain and saturation (when a saturation control is present, like on my Peavey MX) and it helped a lot. You can turn the mids a little higher, while cutting back the bass, you'll still have plenty low end without getting muddy or flabby.

Come to think of it I did the same thing last might at a gig, forgot to check the tone controls on the Super Reverb, bass was around 7, low notes were good and clean but too much, jumped out at me. Pulled it back to around 4 where I normally run it, no problem all night.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...