#3
I saw a photo of Dave Murray of Iron Maiden with an Epiphone LP Ultra on stage... As for Standards, I don't know any. But really, there are a lot of famous artists out there that use far less expensive stuff than they're generally given credit for. Not everyone is out there playing customshop one-offs...

The Epiphone LP Standard is a fine guitar fully capable of being used in a professional setting.
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#4
Nancy Wilson from Heart uses Epi LPs occasionally. the real answer is that many up and coming bands use them. once you get to a certain level of success you are far less likely to be using mid tier gear. epi LP's and say guitars like MIM strats are bar band staples and capable of delivering a quality sound for the average musician. lets face it as soon as a band starts to make real money more often than not the first thing they do is blow it on "better" gear. i'm guessing that most Epi LP users want an actual gibson at some point.
#5
My Chemical Romance used to use Epi LP customs
One of the guys from Taking Back Sunday used to use them

But monwobobo summed it up pretty well
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#6
Quote by Robbgnarly
My Chemical Romance used to use Epi LP customs
One of the guys from Taking Back Sunday used to use them

But monwobobo summed it up pretty well


MCR actually used Elitists Customs. Saw some live pics and they were in a guitar mag interview as well.
Moving on.....
#7
Quote by monwobobbo
Nancy Wilson from Heart uses Epi LPs occasionally. the real answer is that many up and coming bands use them. once you get to a certain level of success you are far less likely to be using mid tier gear. epi LP's and say guitars like MIM strats are bar band staples and capable of delivering a quality sound for the average musician. lets face it as soon as a band starts to make real money more often than not the first thing they do is blow it on "better" gear. i'm guessing that most Epi LP users want an actual gibson at some point.



The Ultra was made mainly to her Specs. She wanted less weight and contours as well as the piezo nanomag.
Moving on.....
#8
Quote by paruwi


He only plays that because it's his signature model (i.e. to make money), otherwise there's no way in hell he'd be playing that instead of multiple real 59 LPs.
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#9
Quote by Badmotorfingers
He only plays that because it's his signature model (i.e. to make money), otherwise there's no way in hell he'd be playing that instead of multiple real 59 LPs.


So you're saying that he plays that to make more money to afford more real '59's?

We have a lot of bands who normally play Epis here in LA. Sometimes when they have a big gig, they borrow Gibsons for the night and then take them back in the morning.
#10
Quote by dspellman
So you're saying that he plays that to make more money to afford more real '59's?

We have a lot of bands who normally play Epis here in LA. Sometimes when they have a big gig, they borrow Gibsons for the night and then take them back in the morning.


pretty sure he's saying joe played those for publicity to promote the guitar for epiphone. joe definitely doesn't play them on a regular basis. since he is a paid endorser then yeah it's to make money.

Dave Mustaine was playing the cheap version of one of his dean sigs during one song on each tour date and then giving he guitar away to a fan that had the right code on his concert ticket. once again t promote the guitar not because it was so awesome that it could replace his custom shop guitar that he normally used.
#11
Quote by dspellman
So you're saying that he plays that to make more money to afford more real '59's?

We have a lot of bands who normally play Epis here in LA. Sometimes when they have a big gig, they borrow Gibsons for the night and then take them back in the morning.

Why would anyone buy them if he doesn't play them? Quite a lot of the people that go to his shows are just as interested in the vintage guitars he plays as him.

He also does the need money probably, since he buys very expensive guitars & amps and sometimes has to sell some to get new ones.

And you're going to tell me a dude that buys actual 59 Les Pauls and thinks they are the best guitars around is going to play an Epiphone because he thinks it's a comparable guitar?
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Last edited by Badmotorfingers at Apr 12, 2015,
#12
Bonamassa does not personally own all of the vintage guitars he plays on stage. Watch rig-rundowns with his tech, he says collectors lend him their bursts at times.

The reason for Bonamassa playing Epiphones is the same as him playing 1959 Les Pauls on stage - it's good for business. Do you think he'd notice any difference between a real 1959 and a Customshop VOS under the spotlight? What is he, some superhuman? The audience, however, cares. There's a whole circus of mythmaking going on around Bonamassa, and in the light of that the only thing that would be right for him would be to play those treasured vintage guitars and to benefit from the myth.
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#13
Quote by HomerSGR
Bonamassa does not personally own all of the vintage guitars he plays on stage. Watch rig-rundowns with his tech, he says collectors lend him their bursts at times.

The reason for Bonamassa playing Epiphones is the same as him playing 1959 Les Pauls on stage - it's good for business. Do you think he'd notice any difference between a real 1959 and a Customshop VOS under the spotlight? What is he, some superhuman? The audience, however, cares. There's a whole circus of mythmaking going on around Bonamassa, and in the light of that the only thing that would be right for him would be to play those treasured vintage guitars and to benefit from the myth.


actually i'm thinking he could notice the difference between a real 59 and a reiisue. keep i mind that the finish on the new ones is different (nitro but not the same formulation) and i'd think they would feel a little different. the audience would be far less likely to tell the difference between a real and a reissue 59 especially if the reissue has been aged.

yup joe has said that he has been lent some vintage guitars to play. sure collectors love the idea tht there guitar was played in a concert by him.
#14
Quote by HomerSGR
Bonamassa does not personally own all of the vintage guitars he plays on stage. Watch rig-rundowns with his tech, he says collectors lend him their bursts at times.

The reason for Bonamassa playing Epiphones is the same as him playing 1959 Les Pauls on stage - it's good for business. Do you think he'd notice any difference between a real 1959 and a Customshop VOS under the spotlight? What is he, some superhuman? The audience, however, cares. There's a whole circus of mythmaking going on around Bonamassa, and in the light of that the only thing that would be right for him would be to play those treasured vintage guitars and to benefit from the myth.


I know that, he also does own a few of them or has at least owned a few.

Kind of, but have you ever seen interviews with him? It didn't seem like he was faking it, he really is into the whole 59 Les Paul thing himself and someone who thinks that way would not play an Epiphone because they 'want' to.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPiPqV28EY0
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#16
I think one of the dudes from Trivium uses or used Epiphone
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#17
Trent Reznor played an Epiphone Les Paul in Nine Inch Nails. There are a lot of players who could afford anything and still play Epiphone's. Tommy Thayer plays a few songs during each KISS show on one of his signature Epi Les Paul's. I would assume that it is mostly for the publicity to sell the modal but I played one and really liked it.
Nancy Wilson of HEART also promotes an Epiphone Les Paul Ultra modal and I have seen concert videos on YouTube with her actually playing it. You can go back in history and bring up names like John Lee Hooker, John Lennon, Keith Richards, and others who played a Epiphone Sheraton and Casino's.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 13, 2015,
#18
One thing I think a lot of people miss is just because a musician is playing a guitar that says a certain name, it might not actually be made by that company. Look at Slash, he was famous for playing a Gibson LP that was not made by Gibson at all. many players that have Squier's, Epiphone's they play live are actually made in the Custom shop of the parent company's (Fender/Gibson). But some are basically a licensed 1 off copy like Slash had.
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#19
Quote by Robbgnarly
One thing I think a lot of people miss is just because a musician is playing a guitar that says a certain name, it might not actually be made by that company. Look at Slash, he was famous for playing a Gibson LP that was not made by Gibson at all. many players that have Squier's, Epiphone's they play live are actually made in the Custom shop of the parent company's (Fender/Gibson). But some are basically a licensed 1 off copy like Slash had.

Indeed Steve Vai's Evo and Flo are apparently the same story.
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#20
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Indeed Steve Vai's Evo and Flo are apparently the same story.


Yeah, but Ibanez has always been a special case in that they never (until the Premium Factory in Indonesia) owned or co-owned the factories their guitars were made in. A "Customshop" Ibanez could then be made anywhere in the world, by whatever builder they contracted. I believe Paul Gilbert said that his reason for choosing to go with Ibanez was that they had no limitations as to what they could build because of this.
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#21
You're right about Slash. His main guitar is his Les Paul replica made by Kris Derrig and is not a Gibson. I love the idea that Gibson had to borrow the Derrig made guitar to measure in order to re-create to make the Gibson and Epiphone Slash Appetite modals.

Most celebrity endorsement players have custom shop made guitars. They don't generally use the off the rack stuff because they don't have to.
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#22
Quote by Robbgnarly
But some are basically a licensed 1 off copy like Slash had.


Neither the Max nor the Derrig guitars that Slash played were "licensed." They were both deadnuts copies of a '59 burst, something Gibson has either been reluctant or found impossible to do to this day.

Gibson never sanctioned those guitars ('59s are still duplicated to a level that requires experts to get extremely squinty to tell them from originals) and were more than a bit embarrassed to have their company (and the Les Paul itself) saved (the Les Paul was pretty much scheduled to be discontinued yet again) by a highly toxic guitar player using a counterfeit guitar. Remember that this was only a year or so after Gibson (as a company) was sold off to Henry J and his small consortium for a measly $4 mil.

Nothing about the guitars Gibson has produced as signature guitars for Slash has ever really come close to the Derrig.
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 14, 2015,
#23
Quote by HomerSGR
Yeah, but Ibanez has always been a special case in that they never (until the Premium Factory in Indonesia) owned or co-owned the factories their guitars were made in. A "Customshop" Ibanez could then be made anywhere in the world, by whatever builder they contracted. I believe Paul Gilbert said that his reason for choosing to go with Ibanez was that they had no limitations as to what they could build because of this.


Ibanez has "custom builders" all over, and they'll ship decals, hardware, body templates and even paint to these guys, but after that the artist often dictates the particulars. I've been aware of a couple of Ibanez custom builders in LA who've done some fairly exotic guitars (including neck-through versions of some set neck guitars, etc.) that only loosely resemble the "signature" guitars Ibanez sells to the public in the artists' names.
#24
Quote by dspellman
Neither the Max nor the Derrig guitars that Slash played were "licensed." They were both deadnuts copies of a '59 burst, something Gibson has either been reluctant or found impossible to do to this day.

Gibson never sanctioned those guitars ('59s are still duplicated to a level that requires experts to get extremely squinty to tell them from originals) and were more than a bit embarrassed to have their company (and the Les Paul itself) saved (the Les Paul was pretty much scheduled to be discontinued yet again) by a highly toxic guitar player using a counterfeit guitar. Remember that this was only a year or so after Gibson (as a company) was sold off to Henry J and his small consortium for a measly $4 mil.

Nothing about the guitars Gibson has produced as signature guitars for Slash has ever really come close to the Derrig.


i dunno about some of this. deadnuts copies is kind of a bold statement considering there really is little proof that they are. making a copy look the same is one thing but do they have the exact sound is another. i'm sure gibson could make an exact replica if they had the materialls available. it's a fact that they can no longer get or use the same finish so right there is an issue. the woods used are at this point rare hard to find and finding actual old growth wood is next to impossible at this point. i'm thinking that some compromises have to be made regardless of the builder. Slash's guitar while nice may be no better than any number of historics out there but since it's not likely any of us will ever get to play it who knows.