#1
So i guess i pulled on my trem a little too hard and the g and a string popped out of the saddles, no not wanting to put too much tension on the neck i blocked the trem, now i can't get strings until tommorow because everythings closed and im wondering if i just leave it like this will it be bad for the guitar?
#2
Totally fine. Not sure what blocking the trem has to do with neck tension, though. If anything there would be less than normal tension since you're missing two strings.
#3
What i meant is i blocked it so it wasn't just completely dipped leaving the strings having alot of tension on the neck, but thank you!
#5
Yeah, unless the bridge fell all the way in, to the point that it's resting on the guitar body on the inside, the total tension on the neck should actually be exactly the same as it was before the strings came out. The springs in the back are just pulling more, because they're not being fought by the two missing strings. If the bridge is still floating at all (that is, not resting on the guitar body), that means it was able to even itself out. Obviously it's not going to still be in tune like that, but it's not putting any more tension on the neck, even though the position of the bridge may look like it is.

Either way, necks are more durable than a lot of people give them credit for, at least if it's a halfway decent guitar. Just for one night, it'll be fine. You don't even have to block the trem.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#6
Quote by kitcatski1
What i meant is i blocked it so it wasn't just completely dipped leaving the strings having alot of tension on the neck, but thank you!


That's not really how it works. Just because the bridge is dipped, doesn't mean it's putting more tension on the neck. It just means that it's not being pulled back up the way it should because there's less tension on the string side. Like I said in my previous post a minute ago, if the bridge is still floating, even the slightest bit, the remaining strings are still balanced against the springs. They're just pulled sharp because there's more tension per string than there was before the two came out. The total tension on the neck is exactly what it was before.

If, on the other hand, the bridge is now dipped all the way down to the point that it's resting on the guitar body, then the total tension on the neck is actually less than it was before. But there's no way this circumstance could produce more tension on the neck. That's just simple physics. The neck will be just fine, trem blocked or not.

Although, blocking the trem like you did (or detuning the remaining strings like Roc suggested) is still probably a good idea, just to keep those strings from getting stretched, if you intend to keep using them. I usually just replace all my strings every time anything goes wrong with even one of them, though.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
Last edited by the_bi99man at Apr 12, 2015,
#7

This is how i have it blocked, i just want to make sure it wont bend any of the metal on the trem
#8
How in the world would that increase tension on the neck? Think about what you've done there. You broke two strings, which obviously lowers total tension, and now you've moved the trem off the body, which further lowers the string tension.

It's a fine idea, there's nothing wrong with it and you won't damage anything, but you're backwards on your ideas about tension.
#9
I was saying i was raising the trem so it wouldnt put tension on the neck, when the strings broke the trem dipped making the strings tighter
#11
You have it backwards. When the strings broke, the trem dipped because the string tension from the missing two strings went away completely. It dipped because the string tension dropped, not because the tension increased (how would that happen? Impossible to add tension by removing strings).

The trem cannot tighten itself. That's why we were confused. There was never any tension added, so it was unnecessary to block in order to lower it. You assumed that the trem moving meant more tension, which was not the case.

Think of it this way: with all the strings on, there is a balance between the string tension and the spring tension. The trem does not move unless you add tension to either side by pushing the bar. If you remove strings, you remove tension from one side which causes the other side (the springs) to pull the bridge closer. You have not added any tension anywhere, you've just unbalanced the system.
#12
You can leave that thing like that for about 40 years with no ill effects to the guitar.

OTHER stuff might screw with it, but not that.