#1
So about a month or so ago I posted seeking help on getting recording tips in this forum. I learned a bunch of cool stuff, such as the importance of DAWs and audio interface options that we all have to choose from...

What I still haven't been able to determine though, is which way of recording my guitar cover videos will be right for me. As of now, I have determined that I have 3 options...

Option #1: What I like to call the "KillrBuckeye" Method... I'm sure most of you reading this know who Killrbuckeye is. If not, he's a youtuber that makes guitar cover videos, or rather, used to. There's a link to his website here, where he goes in depth explaining how his recording process works. http://www.killrbuckeye.com/RecordingMethod.php

He plugs a line 6 POD thing in, checks to make sure that his volume level of his guitar is good compared to the song in audacity, (I guess I would use Reaper though) and then he hits record and records the song with the volume coming out of his computer speakers so can follow the original track which is ALSO coming out of the computer speakers... This method seems easy enough to use, since you don't have to wear headphones, and you have the original track to follow the one you end up recording over it. It plays through you computer or laptop speakers, and you just play over it, and the original track helps you keep time. Then, through the editing process, you can adjust the volume of both tracks to make your track a bit louder. Viola!


Option #2: The method I wanted to do right from the start: "Mic'ed Cab Method"

Take an audio interface and a cab with a mic (dynamic mic or condenser? Help me out guys...) and record the sound of your amp. This method confuses me, because I see lots of cover videos of guys playing the song with the original track in the background playing, and I don't see them with headphones on, soooooo how the **** are they doing it and getting such a clear sound?!!?!?!

Seriously... Please help me answer that last question ^^^^

Are they playing the backing track in a stereo system (like a JVC with two speakers) in the background, or using a boombox? If so, why does it sound so clear? At least, in some of the better recorded covers I've seen/heard...

I REALLY wanna record using this method, because I love the sound of my laney ironheart and marshall 4X12 cab, but the backing track part has me on the fence about this, I'm really confused and so far no one has been able to give me an answer...

If I played the backing track externally using a JVC, or hell, even the speakers from my computer/laptop, while I played over it using my mic'ed amp, would the mic pick up both tracks will good accuracy? Would editing be a bitch though, because now the mic has picked up 2 different sounds in one recording?!! This doesn't seem like it would be very practical, because then during the editing process you would probably have to add ANOTHER track so that the volume levels of each track would sync up properly.... Jesus ****ing ****... My brain is already in knots over this...


And finally, Option #3: The same as above, but with headphones.^^^

This is the method that I would rather not do, but it will probably save me the most frustration/pain/anger/agony....

You basically record with a mic'ed cab, but you use headphones to listen to the original track from your ipod. The mic picks up your track coming from the amp, and then, using the editing process, you add the original track and adjust the volume levels of each, and PRESTO! You've got yourself an easily recorded cover track....

The only drawback; Being seen with headphones on... I don't know why this bothers me so much, maybe because aesthetically it makes me feel that the whole thing is more processed, and when it comes to music, you want everything to feel spontaneous and in the moment... I don't like the look of the headphones at all in the cover video, but maybe I'll have to go this route if no one reading this can give me any helpful info and clear up any of the confusion that I have...

Let me know what you guys think... Please help me. Thank you!
#2
Quote by DeathShredder23
Option #2: The method I wanted to do right from the start: "Mic'ed Cab Method"

Take an audio interface and a cab with a mic (dynamic mic or condenser? Help me out guys...) and record the sound of your amp. This method confuses me, because I see lots of cover videos of guys playing the song with the original track in the background playing, and I don't see them with headphones on, soooooo how the **** are they doing it and getting such a clear sound?!!?!?!

Seriously... Please help me answer that last question ^^^^

Are they playing the backing track in a stereo system (like a JVC with two speakers) in the background, or using a boombox? If so, why does it sound so clear? At least, in some of the better recorded covers I've seen/heard...

I REALLY wanna record using this method, because I love the sound of my laney ironheart and marshall 4X12 cab, but the backing track part has me on the fence about this, I'm really confused and so far no one has been able to give me an answer...

If I played the backing track externally using a JVC, or hell, even the speakers from my computer/laptop, while I played over it using my mic'ed amp, would the mic pick up both tracks will good accuracy? Would editing be a bitch though, because now the mic has picked up 2 different sounds in one recording?!! This doesn't seem like it would be very practical, because then during the editing process you would probably have to add ANOTHER track so that the volume levels of each track would sync up properly.... Jesus ****ing ****... My brain is already in knots over this...

Well, you aren't using the camera audio so it doesn't really matter how it sounds in the room when they record it. They can easily be playing along to just the backing, which will come through speakers not too loud and not pointing towards front of mic, hearing only the live sound of their amp, and then the audio in the video is the recording of that playing with the other tracks.

Essentially, it's like a video of them tracking part of a song but the final mix is the audio accompanying the video.

All you need to do is clap at the start or something, align the audio with that visual cue (the clap) in your video software after you're happy with the sound of the recording, and then trim off the beginning where the clap is.


As for the mic picking it up - have your amp set up in a place so that the back of the mic is pointing towards the source of the backing tracks (the computer speakers) assuming you're using a typical cardioid polar pattern (which makes most sense if you're close miking a cab, and is the only polar pattern of common dynamic mics used for this e.g. SM57, e906, Audix i-5). That way, any bleed will be pretty minimal and as long as there's reasonable volume coming from the amp, it should be sufficiently louder and ensure that any bleed is quiet enough to be masked by the amp signal and not affect the recording significantly.
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#3
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Well, you aren't using the camera audio so it doesn't really matter how it sounds in the room when they record it. They can easily be playing along to just the backing, which will come through speakers not too loud and not pointing towards front of mic, hearing only the live sound of their amp, and then the audio in the video is the recording of that playing with the other tracks.

Essentially, it's like a video of them tracking part of a song but the final mix is the audio accompanying the video.

All you need to do is clap at the start or something, align the audio with that visual cue (the clap) in your video software after you're happy with the sound of the recording, and then trim off the beginning where the clap is.


As for the mic picking it up - have your amp set up in a place so that the back of the mic is pointing towards the source of the backing tracks (the computer speakers) assuming you're using a typical cardioid polar pattern (which makes most sense if you're close miking a cab, and is the only polar pattern of common dynamic mics used for this e.g. SM57, e906, Audix i-5). That way, any bleed will be pretty minimal and as long as there's reasonable volume coming from the amp, it should be sufficiently louder and ensure that any bleed is quiet enough to be masked by the amp signal and not affect the recording significantly.


Ok, so just make sure the laptop, or boombox where the original play-along track is coming from is far enough away and at a low enough volume... Makes sense.
Also, make sure that the back of the mic faces it, so that the brunt of the sound is picked up from the amp and not much else.

Theoretically speaking, I COULD play the whole song with NO backing track, and as long as I kept time perfectly and didn't **** up, could just add the original track in the background during the editing process, right?
#4
Quote by DeathShredder23
Ok, so just make sure the laptop, or boombox where the original play-along track is coming from is far enough away and at a low enough volume... Makes sense.
Also, make sure that the back of the mic faces it, so that the brunt of the sound is picked up from the amp and not much else.

Yep

Theoretically speaking, I COULD play the whole song with NO backing track, and as long as I kept time perfectly and didn't **** up, could just add the original track in the background during the editing process, right?

Theoretically, yes, but in practice that's nigh on impossible unless you're gonna go to all the hassle of editing your recording to be back in time with the backing (which, no offence, I'm presuming may be beyond your current skills in a DAW). It's just not worth the hassle, nobody can play in time perfectly all the way from start to finish, well enough for the recording to align perfectly with a backing they weren't playing to, unless you were playing to a click track instead.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#5
most of the cover guys record the audio and the video separately ... they first get the recording done , then shoot a video of themselves playing the exact same thing , and later mix the pre-recorded audio with the video . Hope that helped
#6
Quote by NRG_sama_
most of the cover guys record the audio and the video separately ... they first get the recording done , then shoot a video of themselves playing the exact same thing , and later mix the pre-recorded audio with the video . Hope that helped



Wow, I never even thought of doing it that way... Wow thanks man!

Could you elaborate a bit further in detail on how the whole process would be done?

Like from first step to last? Thanks man.

Really appreciate it!
#7
Quote by DeathShredder23
Wow, I never even thought of doing it that way... Wow thanks man!

Could you elaborate a bit further in detail on how the whole process would be done?

Like from first step to last? Thanks man.

Really appreciate it!


Here's a pretty good tutorial series
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8533E5DF84C1198F

It goes into detail about recording, mixing, video shooting and editing. pretty much everything.
#8
The cabs are isolated some kind of way, either iso speaker or further away from the playback source, not hard to do especially with dynamic mic.

Syncing is easy, I do it with a 4 click from metronome in the DAW, but anything works as long as it is the same in the recording and in the room mics (cam mics).
#9
Quote by DeathShredder23

Could you elaborate a bit further in detail on how the whole process would be done?


sure thing

1. get a backing track , load it on your DAW

2. record your stuff (the audio) on a separate audio channel (using mic'd cab method . You can have the backing track running in your headphones )

3. render (export) the project into an mp3 (or WAV or FLAC )

4. now comes the video recording part , record a video of yourself playing the song . While recording , you can have the backing track running on your pc speakers . You won't be using the camera audio in the final result , so don't worry about what audio is being picked up .

5. Get a video editing software , and load up the camera video.

6. Insert the audio file you exported earlier (in step 3) . Sync the video and the audio files manually .

7. Now mute(or remove) the audio of the camera video file , so that only the pre-recorded audio is audible.

8. Export the video file and you're done

Hope that helped
Last edited by NRG_sama_ at Apr 16, 2015,
#10
Quote by NRG_sama_
sure thing

1. get a backing track , load it on your DAW

2. record your stuff (the audio) on a separate audio channel (using mic'd cab method . You can have the backing track running in your headphones )

3. render (export) the project into an mp3 (or WAV or FLAC )

4. now comes the video recording part , record a video of yourself playing the song . While recording , you can have the backing track running on your pc speakers . You won't be using the camera audio in the final result , so don't worry about what audio is being picked up .

5. Get a video editing software , and load up the camera video.

6. Insert the audio file you exported earlier (in step 3) . Sync the video and the audio files manually .

7. Now mute(or remove) the audio of the camera video file , so that only the pre-recorded audio is audible.

8. Export the video file and you're done

Hope that helped


Wow... That sounds like I'll be saved a whole bunch of trouble now. I'm gonna try this strategy that you've just laid out.^^^

Thanks amigo! Really appreciate it.
#11
Quote by DeathShredder23


Thanks amigo! Really appreciate it.


You are welcome

I'm glad i was of help