#1
Does it exist????
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#4
Hmmm...

Maybe I just don't like blues bass.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#6
It is a difficult prospect.
I endured seemingly endless hours of improvisation in University studies out of the Real Book(s).
That was after 1 hour a day blues and improvisation studies in my Junior and Senior years in High School.

If you stick with this stuff long enough, you get up the guts to throw down some chords, vari the rhythmic structure of the line and develop some grooves.

Then after all of that is played out you stumble into the alternates and extensions, and Jaco out into space with harmonics and tapping.

Try doing a more involved line on 'I'm goin Down' that you hear Paul Scheaffer doing on the Keys in the Trucks Bonamossa Gibbons Trucks Hill video on the tribute to Freddy King.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#7
Nothing worse than hearing a bassist playing the same riff from start to finish.
Hold on, I stand corrected, there is, it's scales.
I use the chord structure and the mood which is what most of the greats did.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
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#8
torturous John, but that is why it is yet another job
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#9
by definition, blues basslines must stay true and well... "boring" but id be a happy man to play pentatonic walking bass for 4 hours while albert king and Stevie ray vaghan take turns soloing endlessly in question answer format... you want an interesting bassline? Listen to jazz
#10
Quote by slap-a-bass
by definition, blues basslines must stay true and well... "boring" but id be a happy man to play pentatonic walking bass for 4 hours while albert king and Stevie ray vaghan take turns soloing endlessly in question answer format... you want an interesting bassline? Listen to jazz


That is your opinion, I've never played scales in 52 years, I've always played to the chord structure.
I've played:-
Beat
Rock n roll
Big band (Miller etc)
Resident in a Jazz Club
Country
Rock Blues
Delta Blues
Rock
Soft rock
Etc Etc Etc.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#11
you must have never solo'd in 52 years. How are you going to know which passing tones fit between notes within the chord? or when you can go chromatically up or down?

(with scales)
Octatonic is your best friend.
#12
Quote by slap-a-bass
you must have never solo'd in 52 years. How are you going to know which passing tones fit between notes within the chord? or when you can go chromatically up or down?

(with scales)
Octatonic is your best friend.


I've got a bloody good ear, that's why I've always been able to adapt to playing all the genres of music I've played, I've always been sought after, work came looking for me not the other way round.I started when natural ability was the order of the day. Do you honestly think that the Beatles etc knew any theory?
I can just imagine theory freaks going up to Clapton, Green, Beck etc and saying what scale did you use just then.
You may not have heard of Joe Cocker, we were on the same circuit back then in the UK, he worked with our singer at the local gasworks.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#13
Quote by John Swift
I've got a bloody good ear, that's why I've always been able to adapt to playing all the genres of music I've played, I've always been sought after, work came looking for me not the other way round.I started when natural ability was the order of the day. Do you honestly think that the Beatles etc knew any theory?
I can just imagine theory freaks going up to Clapton, Green, Beck etc and saying what scale did you use just then.
You may not have heard of Joe Cocker, we were on the same circuit back then in the UK, he worked with our singer at the local gasworks.


No, but George Martin did...

I'm not dismissing your expertise, but the 'no theory' argument has been old and tired for a long, long time. There are a lot of big names that couldn't / can't read sheet music, but that's not what theory is, that's just the written manifestation thereof.

And not everyone (actually very few) will have your natural gifts, but we still want to play. Theory gives us the tools that nature didn't.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#14
Theory doesn't make ear useless. Actually, to properly understand theory, you need to use your ears. Theory doesn't even tell you what to play. It's a tool you use to explain and analyze music. You still need to use your ears. You always have to. Theory just helps you figure out what's happening in other people's music. It has nothing to do with creativity.

Even if you don't think in scales, it doesn't mean that the notes you play don't fit a scale. Scales shouldn't be played up and down all the time. Scales are just a way to find the notes you are looking for. No, you don't need to learn/practice them by playing up and down. That's actually not even that practical, because that way you may end up just playing them up and down. It's a fact that scales are part of music. You can decide not to learn them, but that doesn't mean what you play doesn't fit a scale.

You should always use your ears, regardless of whether you know what scale you are playing or not. If it sounds good, it is good.

I see nothing wrong with playing the same riff/groove. Just listen to some Duran Duran for example. The basslines are great, but they are pretty carefully thought out. The bassist doesn't improvise them, he always plays the same things over the chords. But who cares? It fits the music perfectly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3W6yf6c-FA

Well, it's not blues but whatever.


Oh, and Runnin' with the Devil by Van Halen is a good example of a "boring" bassline that fits the song perfectly. If you started improvising some chord tones over the guitar riff, it just wouldn't work. It may be boring for the bassist, but you need to play music. Sometimes keeping it as simple as possible is the best thing you can do. The same applies to AC/DC.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 1, 2015,
#15
Quote by Arby911
No, but George Martin did...

I'm not dismissing your expertise, but the 'no theory' argument has been old and tired for a long, long time. There are a lot of big names that couldn't / can't read sheet music, but that's not what theory is, that's just the written manifestation thereof.

And not everyone (actually very few) will have your natural gifts, but we still want to play. Theory gives us the tools that nature didn't.

Didn't know George Martin composed the Beatles songs, do you think he gets royalties.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#16
Quote by MaggaraMarine



Oh, and Runnin' with the Devil by Van Halen is a good example of a "boring" bassline that fits the song perfectly. If you started improvising some chord tones over the guitar riff, it just wouldn't work. It may be boring for the bassist, but you need to play music. Sometimes keeping it as simple as possible is the best thing you can do. The same applies to AC/DC.

Many songs, especially Blues songs have mood changes, a good Bassist plays according to the mood change therefor making it more effective. playing against a mood change reduces the effectiveness of the said change.
That'll be ten pounds please. next lesson will be full price no discount.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#17
^ Yeah. I didn't say bassists should always play as simple stuff as possible. I just said sometimes keeping it really simple is what works best. You need to listen to the music.

If you want to argue about theory, take any well known classical composer, and I'm pretty sure they knew theory. I'm also pretty sure many great jazz musicians know theory.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 1, 2015,
#18
Quote by John Swift
Didn't know George Martin composed the Beatles songs, do you think he gets royalties.


Now you're being petulant and pedantic. If you know as much about music as you claim, you know what George Martin did for the Beatles.

The answer to your question, however ill intended it was, is simply...

Yes. For some of their catalog he does\did indeed.

Next?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at May 1, 2015,
#19
Heads up from the moderator. Lets steer this a bit back to subject or the thread is going to be closed...
#21
Quote by Arby911
Now you're being petulant and pedantic. If you know as much about music as you claim, you know what George Martin did for the Beatles.


Yes I studied music in London England 1967/8 everything from popular music to heavy classics including a sell out concert at 'The Royal Festival Hall' The course was very intense 5 days per week 8am till 1600pm each day theory classes, instrumentation where you learned to arrange for all the orchestral instruments, sections, dance band etc etc
The place where I studied in London was at The 'Royal Military School of Music'.
My military band instrument was Tenor Sax you could not shirk or you didn't go home at the weekend.
So yes I do know a little bit about music.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#23
Quote by c3powil
Hmmm...

Maybe I just don't like blues bass.

Blues like many other genres of music has been corrupted and hijacked.
I Have played in several so called Blues bands the only authentic one to me was the Delta Blues band this had more feel than the so called rock blues bands, therefore you played according to the mood changes that took place.
G&L L2500
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Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#24
Quote by Arby911
Johnny Gayden

Skip to about 5 mins in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fA6tTW1RomI


Sorry that's not blues that's funk.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#25
Look on You Tube and listen to 'Little Willie John' (Need Your Love So Bad) now that is Blues and while you're learning listen to the varying Bassline.
Listen to John McVie on the same song once again Blues not Rock.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#26
Quote by John Swift
Sorry that's not blues that's funk.


Your opinion is noted and has been given the weight I feel it deserves.

Have a nice day.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#27
It's still funk though, whether you like John or not.

TS, if you want some more recent blues bass awesomeness, Nathan East. The man has a huge genre repertoire, but I think his blues work is his best. Again, it all boils down to the mood, and the ability to direct how a piece feels. That doesn't mean simple, it doesn't mean technical. It means having a damn good ear and often improvisational skills. Instead of focussing on the bass line itself, focus on how it fits within the piece. If you take a bassline that's a part of a whole, whether it's Mark Hoppus or John Myung, chances are it will sound boring. But that's not how that line is meant to be listened to. Study a line as part of a piece.
#28
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's still funk though, whether you like John or not.



I disagree, but genre wars are of no interest to me. To each his own.

Look up the history of the piece and see if you reach the same decision.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#30
Quote by Arby911
I disagree, but genre wars are of no interest to me. To each his own.

Look up the history of the piece and see if you reach the same decision.


Nothing to do with Genre wars it's about an in depth knowledge of the subject, you obviously don't know the difference between funk and blues, the actual difference is light years.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#31
Quote by John Swift
Nothing to do with Genre wars it's about an in depth knowledge of the subject, you obviously don't know the difference between funk and blues, the actual difference is light years.


Have a nice day.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#32
Quote by Arby911
Have a nice day.


I did I had a great gig with my band.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#33
Well, I agree with Delirium and John, it's pretty clearly funk. It's played in a funk style, and that's what makes it funk.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#34
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Well, I agree with Delirium and John, it's pretty clearly funk. It's played in a funk style, and that's what makes it funk.




As noted, I've no interest in arguing the point. If the OP doesn't like what I've posted, they are free to dismiss it.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#35
If anyone doubts what is blues and what isn't just look up the late great BB King on You Tube.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#36
If you want to hear some blues bass that's interesting, just aim for some jazz- blues - Kind of Blue Freddie the Freeloader etc. You get the joy of hearing an amazing bass line played over slightly more complicated blues changes.

Blues is a minimalist style that's strength is in the execution, not the complexity.