#1
I've been playing an acoustic here lately because either my guitar or my amp is on the fritz. However, since I have rather smallish hands and it is much more difficult to depress the strings, I must be constantly aware of the form of my fretting hand. A fretting hand contorted like a raisin is not conducive to shredding on an electric, right?
I'm concerned that although my fret hand may become a bit stronger, ultimately my form will suffer. Thoughts, o ye gods of shred?
#2
What you need is a new amp
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#3
Quote by The Judist
What you need is a new amp

My dad hooked his foot on the power chord, which slapped the front of the amp flat against the floor. Now the hex nut around the port which accepts the chord from the guitar to the amp has come loose at times, as indicated by the sound cutting in and out.
A few turns of a pair of needle-nose pliers fixed that. I hope it isn't the amp! But do you think playing that old stubborn acoustic will enhance or inhibit my ability to shred?
#4
A badly set up guitar (acoustic or electric) will not help you learn any style of music. Get it set up properly if that's the issue and you'll have a lot more fun playing with it, which will lead to more productive practice sessions.
#5
I've been practicing on an acoustic for many years, it should actually help your playing once you switch to electric. If it's not set up well it might be really hard to play, so I agree a good setup is a good idea.

I almost always learn new songs on acoustic then switch to electric, I practice leads on acoustic, and I usually advise practicing on acoustic. The only change you need to make when going to electric is using a bit lighter touch.

As for the amp, it could be damaged by the drop, especially if it's a tube amp. If it still basically works, it's probably not too bad. I'd have a tech look at it, a new input jack might be a good idea. Well, if it were mine I'd replace the jack myself, but that's a whole nuther story...What happened depends on the amp. If it's built like my older Fenders, the jack is connected to the amp with wires, turning it might twist those wires against each other and could possibly cause a direct short. If that happened you'd know it when the fuse blew...or it did nothing...

If it's a surface mount jack it could have broken the solder connections loose. Or broken the plastic jack body. Or trashed the threads on the plastic nut...

If it's a tube amp, the fall could break a tube, but you'd know that pretty quick. Not much else can actually break, except where the guitar jack is plugged in. Still, the impact is not good for it...I'd have a tech look at it.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#6
I don't have anything substantive to contribute, except I love the Dooneese avatar!
#7
Quote by Paleo Pete


As for the amp, it could be damaged by the drop, especially if it's a tube amp. If it still basically works, it's probably not too bad. I'd have a tech look at it, a new input jack might be a good idea. Well, if it were mine I'd replace the jack myself, but that's a whole nuther story...What happened depends on the amp. If it's built like my older Fenders, the jack is connected to the amp with wires, turning it might twist those wires against each other and could possibly cause a direct short. If that happened you'd know it when the fuse blew...or it did nothing...
If it's a tube amp, the fall could break a tube, but you'd know that pretty quick. Not much else can actually break, except where the guitar jack is plugged in. Still, the impact is not good for it...I'd have a tech look at it.

The amp was the problem...a combo amp.
After fiddling w the input jack, I got a connection. Seems the jack is messed up.
#8
I played acoustic, using 13-56 strings, for many years before I took up electric. I have never acquired decent electric skills, and in my case I'm pretty sure it is because of the different touch and responses of the two instruments. Some players seem to be able to do both well (not many, and I don't mean playing an acoustic like an electric or vice versa), so I think it might come down to the individual. I wouldn't think it would cause a permanent problem in the short term though.
#9
Quote by Hydra26
I don't have anything substantive to contribute, except I love the Dooneese avatar!

Ohhh...so THAT'S her name!
#10
You have muscle memory for shredding on your electric. To also have muscle memory for the acoustic you’ll have to use it a lot. This is why some players always play the same guitar scale, or model, or even just stick to one guitar.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
I'm pretty sure it is because of the different touch and responses of the two instruments


Yup. Hand strength and the more holistic aspects of guitar playing will benefit - things such as ear training, fretboard familiarity and creative exploration. Many of the subtleties of each instrument are quite a bit less complimentary however, particularly due to ergonomics. I know guys that are wizards on an acoustic but really quite clunky on an electric. Nothing that can't be practiced back into form tho - especially if you've been playing electric for a good while already.
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