#1
Rank the following guitarists. Criteria includes overall mastery on the instrument, innovation, ability to create memorable and iconic riffs and licks, and melodic/musical sense / taste, and chops.

Eddie Van Halen

Marty Friedman

Alex Skolnick

George Lynch

John Sykes

Randy Rhoads

Brian May

Reb Beach
#2
they all suck
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#3
They are all great in their own way. No need to compare them. Top three for me on this limited list would be Brian May, EVH and Randy Rhoads because they were originals who did something new when they started playing. They all bring something to the table but speed and shred are not my main criteria for a great player. Being able to play 10 notes per half second doesn't move me musically if there is nothing melodic about it. It amazes me technically but I'd rather hear some emotion and melody rather than sweep picking and blazing speed. That's just me. So I'd choose those three to be in my Top 10 but none of the others. I'd rather hear three well played beautiful notes that add melody to the song from David Gilmour than 30 notes per measure from Yngwie Malmsteen just for the sake of speed alone.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 15, 2015,
#4
All of these fall outside the top ten, therefore any ranking is meaningless.
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#5
Eddie Van Halen
Randy Rhoads
Brian May
John Sykes
George Lynch
Marty Friedman
Alex Skolnick


Reb Beach
#8
Anybody who says Randy Rhoads sucks is a tone deaf moron. Get the hell off of this website. You obviously have NO business here.
#9
Quote by Jerry Asper
Anybody who says Randy Rhoads sucks is a tone deaf moron. Get the hell off of this website. You obviously have NO business here.


I mean his best stuff was his playing on the first two Quiet Riot albums (and I wouldn't be surprised if you haven't listened to those) but that just can't compare with modern electric guitar playing. They've come a looong way in the last three decades. With guys like Paul Gilbert, Marty Friedman, Yngwie, Satch, Vai, Buckethead, Tony McAlpine, Jason Becker, Shawn Lane, Chris Poland, Joe Stump, Rusty Cooley, Ron Jarzombek, etc pioneering significant technical advances in the 80s and 90s and guys like Ron Thal, Mathias Eklund, Dave Martone, (the late) Shane Gibson, Marco Sfogli, Jeff Loomis, Chris Broderick, John5, Guthrie Govan, etc continuing to push the envelope with modern shred guitar, the early 80s hard rock guys have become pretty much obsolete.
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#10
I disagree with the term "pioneering" for many of the players you mention. They are not doing anything new they just do it faster. Playing faster is not necessarily making it better, and in a lot of cases it's not new. To some players (like myself) it's not even very musical in terms of melody and emotion. It's just technically faster but if your criteria for "better" is based on shred ability it's OK for you and other shredder's but I don't care for it. I need melody and emotion and interaction with the song.

That's why they make chocolate and vanilla and 100 other flavors of ice cream.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 24, 2015,
#11
three notes from albert king would put some of those named to shame..alan holdsworth would put all of them to shame..satch-via and govan are in a different world
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Apr 24, 2015,
#12
I agree. Players like Steve Lukather, Larry Carlton, Lee Ritenour and others are players whose tone and technique are more of an influence on me than most of the people on this list. If we are talking about pioneers in the guitar world it would be guys like Les Paul, Jimi Hendrix, EVH, Steve Vai, Buddy Guy, David Gilmour, Wes Montgomery, Jeff Beck etc. These guys played in styles that were relatively unheard of when they began recording. They were not copying anyone, they were influenced by earlier players and they in turn influenced others. Not by playing faster but by using different modes and scales and being more melodic in turn finding ways to make a guitar solo something more than a 12 bar technical exercise of scales.

Like I said, I understand the fascination for shred but I get bored with it pretty quickly.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 24, 2015,
#13
I personally believe you can't really rank musicians. I will rank them in personal favorites though
1- Marty
2- Randy
3- Brian May
4- Alex
5- EVH
6- Lynch
I'm honestly not too familiar with the other two. But Randy and Marty I like a lot.
#14
Seems like an arbitrary list that leaves out a lot of the all time greats, and is also heavily focused on 80s metal/hard rock shredders.

Of the guys on the list I'd say Marty Friedman. He is a really amazing improviser and has a great understanding of music. He has also played a bit in some other styles of music. That was one of the main reasons he left Megadeth. He got bored of Metal and wanted to make more pop type music.

Even if the point of that list was pure shred there are plenty of guitarists who play faster than those guys. This guy held a world record for playing fast...but I'd rather hear someone slowly strum a few chords...or strangle a cat...or nails on a chalkboard....you get the idea.

https://youtu.be/6cGTsX3O-2E?t=4m47s

Quote by Rickholly74
I agree. Players like Steve Lukather, Larry Carlton, Lee Ritenour and others are players whose tone and technique are more of an influence on me than most of the people on this list. If we are talking about pioneers in the guitar world it would be guys like Les Paul, Jimi Hendrix, EVH, Steve Vai, Buddy Guy, David Gilmour, Wes Montgomery, Jeff Beck etc. These guys played in styles that were relatively unheard of when they began recording. They were not copying anyone, they were influenced by earlier players and they in turn influenced others. Not by playing faster but by using different modes and scales and being more melodic in turn finding ways to make a guitar solo something more than a 12 bar technical exercise of scales.

Like I said, I understand the fascination for shred but I get bored with it pretty quickly.


Sums it up pretty nicely I think.
Last edited by bptrav at May 8, 2015,