#1
I've attempted to do the wiring for a guitar for the first time, but it's not quite going to plan! I have everything connected up but when I plugged the body in and tried tapping on the pickup pole pieces with a screwdriver, I wasn't getting any noise at all. I double checked the wiring and fiddled about with it a bit, and tried replacing the jack plug as it was the easiest component to change and I had one to hand. When I replaced it and wired it up exactly the same the same problem persisted. However, when the ground was disconnected and only the hot wire connected, I got a signal, and could hear sound through the amp when I tapped the pickups. But there was a really bad buzzing too. I thought maybe I got the wires the wrong way around, so I connected the hot wire to where the ground had been and vice versa, and I'm back to the problem of getting no sound at all when I tap the pickups. What can I do to fix this? Thanks.
#2
you are correct the wires are in the opposite of what they should be. I do this from time to time when I am rushing projects.

with an input jack this is a piece of cake.

ok so there is one portion that is metal from the contact to the base of the input jack. This is called the sleeve. I think "S.G." like gibsons, dumb since I despise the ground Gibson walks on ...but "sleeve , ground"

the other contact that doesn't have metal near the base of the contact is tip. No clever acronym for this.

When in doubt the way a seymour duncan diagram is illustrated it's pretty easy to distinguish the two on the input jack as not as many people as I'd like to imagine have multimeters. Continuity mode comes in handy you can test connections and have reassurance. Pretty much you do the start and finish of a wire and it beeps if it has a signal.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Apr 15, 2015,
#3
Quote by Tallwood13
you are correct the wires are in the opposite of what they should be. I do this from time to time when I am rushing projects.

with an input jack this is a piece of cake.

ok so there is one portion that is metal from the contact to the base of the input jack. This is called the sleeve. I think "S.G." like gibsons, dumb since I despise the ground Gibson walks on ...but "sleeve , ground"

the other contact that doesn't have metal near the base of the contact is tip. No clever acronym for this.

When in doubt the way a seymour duncan diagram is illustrated it's pretty easy to distinguish the two on the input jack as not as many people as I'd like to imagine have multimeters. Continuity mode comes in handy you can test connections and have reassurance. Pretty much you do the start and finish of a wire and it beeps if it has a signal.


Hi, thanks for the help. I switched the two wires over and the buzzing has reduced, however it's still happening, but it's much worse at certain positions on the pickup switch. Also, it reduces if I lift up the jack cable? I'm so confused.
Last edited by tex_ at Apr 15, 2015,
#4
Quote by tex_
Hi, thanks for the help. I switched the two wires over and the buzzing has reduced, however it's still happening, but it's much worse at certain positions on the pickup switch. Also, it reduces if I lift up the jack cable? I'm so confused.


Aside from the output jack, is there anywhere else that you have the electronics grounded?

It may also be the actual solder joints perhaps something is loose or you have a weak joint somewhere?
~Vince~
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Squier Affinity Fat Strat [Modded]
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#5
Quote by xvasmx
Aside from the output jack, is there anywhere else that you have the electronics grounded?

It may also be the actual solder joints perhaps something is loose or you have a weak joint somewhere?


That what I've been thinking. The output jack and the bridge pickup are grounded to the trem claw and everything else is grounded to the back of the volume pot. The joints all seem strong though.
#6
There seems to be something wrong with how I've wired the pickups. At positions 1 and 5 of the pickup switch none of them seem to be acting, at the 2nd and middle position the middle and bridge pickups are acting and at the 4th position all 3 of them are acting.
#7
Okay, I think I have two problems:

The first I think is a grounding problem. After reversing the jack socket wires the buzzing has been reduced but it is still prominent- more importantly, it goes away if I touch the jack or other metal parts. Could someone please confirm that this is a grounding issue or could there be another explanation for this?
Secondly, I think something up with the wiring to the pickup selector! By tapping the pickups I know they are all functioning but they aren't responding as they should at each position on the switch. I have no idea how to fix this. I have checked the wiring repeatedly, the connections are all as they are in the diagram I've been following and they're all solid. I just don't know what to do! If it helps, this is the diagram I used http://www.guitarelectronics.com/media/img/guitarelectronics/W575-H550-Bffffff/W/wd3sss5l12_000.jpg
It was followed to the letter except there is also a capacitor on the middle tone and there is a killswitch too which was connected to the volume pot like the one in this diagram:
http://cdn.instructables.com/FC6/ZZ0X/F8JUW8E8/FC6ZZ0XF8JUW8E8.MEDIUM.jpg

I'm really stuck here so a big thanks to anyone who can help.
#8
string ground for the first one is the problem especially if you touch the strings and the buzz goes. If it does there is your issue. If not remember when grounding it goes.

string ground - so a strats claw or an internal wire soldered to a bridge post on a les paul.
and a trail pot to pot out to the guitar
les paul selectors require to be grounded , but strat ones don't
seymour duncan wiring diagrams are the best in my opinion for most cases

second with guitarelectronics.com wiring of a push pull remember you have to ground the coiltapped wires or they do nothing. That was my big mistake when I first tried coilsplitting pickups. Now I mod pickups so I've come a long way in the past 5 or 6 years. Here's some help. Remember when working with a push pull the top 6 contacts do the effect the regular 3 you can wire them any way you want. So this can be your volume or tone for the top suggestion. Just make sure you're using the right pickup color code of course. But I'm sure you are.

tips? ...forgot if I mentioned them but if not..
*use the leads from capacitors to make it super easy to ground push pulls for coilsplits

*you can use the red/white (seymour duncan) or black/white (dimarzio) wires from two or more pickups and still get the coilsplit tone. Parallel which is a hum cancelling variant is a whole different story.

"split" them at the same push pull contact. My friends LTD or Jackson guitar was like this when he first brought it over when I modded it.

*you can ground to the side of a pot as the entire thing is conductive, so not everything has to be attached to the same bead of solder. You can have beads of solder all over the metal portion of the push pull and it's still ground.

Last edited by Tallwood13 at Apr 15, 2015,
#9
Quote by Tallwood13
string ground for the first one is the problem especially if you touch the strings and the buzz goes. If it does there is your issue. If not remember when grounding it goes.

string ground - so a strats claw or an internal wire soldered to a bridge post on a les paul.
and a trail pot to pot out to the guitar
les paul selectors require to be grounded , but strat ones don't
seymour duncan wiring diagrams are the best in my opinion for most cases

second with guitarelectronics.com wiring of a push pull remember you have to ground the coiltapped wires or they do nothing. That was my big mistake when I first tried coilsplitting pickups. Now I mod pickups so I've come a long way in the past 5 or 6 years. Here's some help. Remember when working with a push pull the top 6 contacts do the effect the regular 3 you can wire them any way you want. So this can be your volume or tone for the top suggestion. Just make sure you're using the right pickup color code of course. But I'm sure you are.

tips? ...forgot if I mentioned them but if not..
*use the leads from capacitors to make it super easy to ground push pulls for coilsplits

*you can use the red/white (seymour duncan) or black/white (dimarzio) wires from two or more pickups and still get the coilsplit tone. Parallel which is a hum cancelling variant is a whole different story.

"split" them at the same push pull contact. My friends LTD or Jackson guitar was like this when he first brought it over when I modded it.

*you can ground to the side of a pot as the entire thing is conductive, so not everything has to be attached to the same bead of solder. You can have beads of solder all over the metal portion of the push pull and it's still ground.



Thanks so much for the response! I thought grounding would be the issue for the first one, the only thing is I've checked all the grounds and all the connections seem fine, I can't see what I'm missing or if that wiring diagram is missing anything? You answered another question I had though, I was wondering if the grounds on the side of a pot needed to be attached to each other, because my grounds are on the back of the volume pot, but not connected.
I'm a bit confused about the other things you mentioned though, I'm not using a push pull pot? Since I've never done any guitar wiring before I started as simple as possible, it's just an SSS setup going to a 5-way switch. No coiltapping or anything!


Edit: I've just realised... I've been talking about tapping the pickups. Sorry if that was misleading, what I meant was, I haven't strung the guitar yet as I wanted to check the electronics were working first. To check the pickups were working at each position I've been tapping them with a screwdriver to hear sound through the amp.
Last edited by tex_ at Apr 15, 2015,