#2
It's good to do some especific exercises, but nothing is better than trying to learn some songs you like. pick some easy songs at first, see the tuning of the instrument on the internet and go for it. It's not hard as people think.
#3
Tbh, in terms of interval training I started out with looking for very common songs (ie christmas carols, traditional songs etc etc) and picking out certain parts of the song(s) and associating them with a specific interval and basically compare & try to hear the interval in my mind.

Something along the lines of this concept: http://www.earmaster.com/products/free-tools/interval-song-chart-generator.html
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#4
I used a similar program and I found that it was really good to get me started. Ultimately I drifted away from using it and spend all my ear training time trying to figure out songs, but I feel that I really needed it in the beginning.

Quote by xvasmx
Tbh, in terms of interval training I started out with looking for very common songs (ie christmas carols, traditional songs etc etc) and picking out certain parts of the song(s) and associating them with a specific interval and basically compare & try to hear the interval in my mind.


This is the one I used - http://www.trainear.com/

like xvasmx says above, I found it helped to associate songs with the intervals and with this one you can choose some songs from a list for each interval if you want or you can keep it with just the interval names. I started with the songs and them switched. This one seems to have a few more features than the one you linked, but I think either would get you started.
Last edited by That_Ship at Apr 16, 2015,
#5
Quote by HugoPan
It's good to do some especific exercises, but nothing is better than trying to learn some songs you like. pick some easy songs at first, see the tuning of the instrument on the internet and go for it. It's not hard as people think.

I agree. This kind of interval trainers lack context. In actual music you will always have a context - you won't hear things out of context.

I'm not saying it's useless of course. But music is in context and you'll learn theoretical stuff a lot easier in context. If theory and practice become too separated, you may not see the connection between theory and actual music.
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#6
My experience is that interval ear training didn't pay much in the way of dividends.

I was really good at it (interestingly, I'm not as good at it now) and yet it didn't translate in terms of actually recognizing stuff in the context of songs.

The Functional Ear Trainer (a free download form miles.be) made a huge impact, almost immediately. Of course, to be fair, I was already good at interval exercises when I started that - but that's what made the big difference for me when trying to figure this stuff out.
#7
Awesome, thanks a lot! I got the functional ear trainer so I'm gonna start putting hours into it. Thanks again.
#8
I'm using an app called Interval Recognition and it uses a few different ways to learn such as song excerpts, old fashioned two notes in interval order, scale context, etc
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Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

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