#1
I would like to "assemble" a baritone, and by that I mean do it by finding a cheap but usable body, and 28.625" baritone neck, put them together, slap on a bridge, put in fresh electronics and pups, and put thick gauge strings on it. I won't skimp on the bridge, pups, or tuning keys. Now, the best way to do this would be to use a Strat or a Tele, because of the bolt on neck and most bari necks are designed for Strats and Teles. But, I do not want to build it out of Fender parts. Unless I absolutely have to. I will if need be, but for now let's completely take that option off the table.

The best option I like is using a Les Paul body. Now like I said, most baritone conversion necks are made specifically for Fenders. Fenders scale length is typically 25.5", and Gibson is 24.75". I plan on getting a Schaller Non-Trem Roller Bridge, because it has amazing features for intonation and string spacing. But even if I put the best bridge on the planet on this guitar will that .75" cause major issues? Or would the neck have to be shorter? I could just order the neck slightly shorter I guess.

That's the major issue I can think of, but please feel free to poke any other holes in my logic. Any input would be greatly appreciated. I am currently on a week of vacation, and have some time on my hands and boundless determination. I just have this urge to create a frankenguitar. Pickup advice would be cool too.
#2
Most Les Pauls are set (glued) necks.

Bolt-on conversion necks are made for bolt-neck guitars like Fenders.

You can get LP-style guitars that already have longer necks. The issue is that beyond about 27-28", even LPs can get a bit neck-heavy due to the placement of the neck area strap button (around the 16th fret). Most strat-alikes have strap buttons around the 12th fret (of a standard 25.5" neck).

I don't know of any readily available conversion necks for the very few bolt-neck LP (ish) guitars that are out there.

I think you need to do a bit more research.
#3
Some cheaper Epiphone's have bolt on necks, and that's just fine because if I am making a monster of a guitar I don't want to destroy a Gibson. I came to the conclusion that I would have to place the bridge saddle back a smidge. Thanks for the reply!
#4
You can get a body from usacg, all parts, or some other makers. If you can finish the guitar yourself it will be cheaper
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#5
Quote by jesusblizzard
Some cheaper Epiphone's have bolt on necks, and that's just fine because if I am making a monster of a guitar I don't want to destroy a Gibson. I came to the conclusion that I would have to place the bridge saddle back a smidge. Thanks for the reply!


the only thing the epi bolton LP's do well is is that they are a great canoe paddle.

get something decent and do it right.
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youre just being a jerk man.



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#6
Quote by jesusblizzard
Some cheaper Epiphone's have bolt on necks, and that's just fine because if I am making a monster of a guitar I don't want to destroy a Gibson. I came to the conclusion that I would have to place the bridge saddle back a smidge. Thanks for the reply!


Then it becomes pointless to start with a cheap Epiphone. You may just as well start with a body that has had the bridge and tailpiece put in the correct positions in the first place. Warmoth has LP-shape bolt-neck bodies, and can place bridges (and pickups) correctly for the baritone neck. But you still have the issue of a possibly neck-heavy guitar. You'll also want to decide whether you want a 22 or a 24-fret neck (it'll make a difference in bridge placement).

Better yet, why not start with a guitar that already has an extended scale neck (Rondo has 27" Baritones that start at $169.99 http://www.rondomusic.com/hadron627.html and move to $600: http://www.rondomusic.com/Baritone_Guitars.html with several LP-shape examples along the way)