#1
I've been playing those same pentatonic scales and same songs for what seems like years. I would buy nee gear all the time hoping to get some Inspiration. I sold most of it off and was going to put my playing on the backburner. A few months ago a friend gave me an old keyboard. I finally started playing with it a few weeks. Ago. I was amazed at how fast I started picking it up. I would use my guitar to figure out the notes for cords and using the songbank to learn new cords on the guitar.
The keyboard has really opened my eyes to a lot of things I was unaware if on guitar. Such as cord and note relationships. It has helped me to learn all the notes on my guitar which was something I was too lazy to do prior. In short , if your in a rut , consider taking up keyboard or piano. It will help out immensely.
#2
Nice to hear that the keyboard inspired you! I've been in several smaller ruts over the nine years I've been playing. The thing that got me out of ruts was "suiting up" and stop being lazy. If you're in a rut, I believe you're either too lazy to use focused practice to open up new musical territories or you need to find a band to be dedicated to. This is, of course, my personal opinion, based on my personal experiences. Ruts are hard, but they're there for a reason.
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#3
Hi urbanater,

The keyboard is easy to understand and it's really helpful to use to make sense of the note mess that is the guitar, In term of ruts, it's due to bad practicing habits. You should read some books and watch some vídeos on effective practice if you really want to take your playing to the next level.

Good luck!
#4
Quote by Yannick Vez
In term of ruts, it's due to bad practicing habits.


What.. no it's not. EVERYONE gets in a rut sooner or later. Practice habits have nothing to do with it
#5
Quote by vayne92
What.. no it's not. EVERYONE gets in a rut sooner or later. Practice habits have nothing to do with it


There is no reason to speak in absolutes. Practice habits can definitely have something to do with it. If you practice the same scales, arpeggios and chords for five years, and do not feel you are progressing, you might be in a rut. A bad example, but I hope you catch my drift.
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#6
As ever, solutions and opinions are presented here with no reasoning behind them given.

The key to understanding this solution is to know what the problem was to begin with! It would seem that the problem for TS was a lack of understanding about the relationship between notes and intervals and chords; a theory problem, which can absolutely be overcome by effective practice and application of knowledge. This time TS has managed to overcome it by using the keyboard to gain a different perspective on the same thing, since it's all theory irrespective of instrument.

Physical ruts again require practice, although it will almost certainly mean a different kind of practice than you're doing already. Physical ruts absolutely happen because your practice isn't right in some way.

Creative ruts... well that's a whole massive thing that I really don't want to get in to. There are so many different things that can factor in to a creative drought it's pretty crazy.

Again: understanding solutions requires understanding the problem. You're all talking about things that really have had no real explanation, since the word "rut" can mean so much to different people.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#7
Quote by wyldelife
There is no reason to speak in absolutes. Practice habits can definitely have something to do with it. If you practice the same scales, arpeggios and chords for five years, and do not feel you are progressing, you might be in a rut. A bad example, but I hope you catch my drift.


Yeah i get what you're saying. I over-reacted a bit
#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
As ever, solutions and opinions are presented here with no reasoning behind them given.

The key to understanding this solution is to know what the problem was to begin with! It would seem that the problem for TS was a lack of understanding about the relationship between notes and intervals and chords; a theory problem, which can absolutely be overcome by effective practice and application of knowledge. This time TS has managed to overcome it by using the keyboard to gain a different perspective on the same thing, since it's all theory irrespective of instrument.

Physical ruts again require practice, although it will almost certainly mean a different kind of practice than you're doing already. Physical ruts absolutely happen because your practice isn't right in some way.

Creative ruts... well that's a whole massive thing that I really don't want to get in to. There are so many different things that can factor in to a creative drought it's pretty crazy.

Again: understanding solutions requires understanding the problem. You're all talking about things that really have had no real explanation, since the word "rut" can mean so much to different people.

Great post with good points!
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#9
If it's a creative rut, listening to new music can help drastically. But there are no guarantees. Oftentimes a person is extremely creative for a certain time in their life and never reach that peak again. It happens with professionals all the time. There's no need to worry about that though and you should always strive to be better.