#1
I'd like some help with this app I've downloaded on my Android called "SmartChord and Tools" (every studying guitarist who is serious should have it, chord library of 300+, chord namer, arpeggio positions, scales, circle of 5ths and metronome). One tool they have is an ear trainer shown below. The red notes are the one I'm practicing.

Problem is once I hear one note, I tend to use intervals by instinct. One note is too easy, two notes is basically a game of higher or lower, and any more and I accidentally use intervals. How can I remedy this?

And while we're here, how did you practice your ear training? What would you recommend?
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Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#2
Are you trying to memorize notes by pitch? Waste of time. Learn to hear intervals instead. I personally can't recommend your method of learning to memorize actual pitches.

I'm just going to quote myself here from a couple of days ago.

Quote by Elintasokas
I got 10/10 (isolated interval ear training app seconds, fourths, fifths, etc)

EDIT: Went up to 100. 100 correct, 2 incorrect, 98 percent. Confused 1 minor sixth for a major 7th and missclicked one. lol.

But this hasn't actually helped me much. It's more helpful to hear the big picture in terms of scale degrees than isolated intervals(unless the music is atonal or something). That's why I think sight singing and transcribing actual music is better.

For example: Instead of hearing 'root - major third - minor third' I hear 'arpeggiated major triad'

And instead of hearing 'down minor second - down major second - down major second - unison - up perfect fifth - down perfect fifth' I hear 'major scale degrees 4-3-2-1-1-5-1'

Eventually you can do that in real time after a lot of practice.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Apr 17, 2015,
#3
Thing is I already practice intervals at the same time, I mentioned my experience in that same thread.
Quote by eric_wearing
I'm using an app called Interval Recognition and it uses a few different ways to learn such as song excerpts, old fashioned two notes in interval order, scale context, etc

I just want to eventually go to a big well renowned college for music and Ik part of the auditions usually involve note and chord recognition in and out of context.
Not only that but I really would like to better play by ear rather than play nearby notes until I'm in key with the music I'm listening to, really would help my transcribing.

Point is, my wants and needs ask for this, so...any help? Lol
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#4
Nobody's going to give you a blind note test, like:

(Ping) "what note was that?"

It will all be in context. Berklee doesn't even have you go in blind.

If they ask you pitch names, you'll know the key.

Relative pitch > absolute pitch
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
^ He said it. Trying to memorize absolute pitches is stupid and useless. I'm sorry, but it's the truth
#6
Ok, so say I did learn it. How would I differ as a musician? Pros and Cons and what not
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#7
There wouldn't be any of either.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
Quote by eric_wearing
Ok, so say I did learn it. How would I differ as a musician? Pros and Cons and what not

I think you can develop a good pitch memory, but there's really no benefits from it - a good relative pitch is everything you'll ever really need (also, memorizing pitches has nothing to do with relative pitch). You'll still hear everything in context. You should practice that skill - hearing stuff in context. And yeah, if you are asked about chord names, the key will be given (or you will just be asked the quality of the chord, not the root of the chord - I mean, you need to tell if it's major, minor, diminished, augmented, dom7, whatever). Nobody will assume you to be able to recognize pitches out of context because perfect pitch is rare (it's something you are born with, and not that many musicians have it).

There are no cons (other than waste of time), but I don't really see any pros in it either.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 19, 2015,