#1
Does anyone have any experience using pedals with guitar to simulate playing both guitar and bass at the same time? I'm completely aware it's not ideal but I'm looking to do it as best I can anyway. I was thinking something like this:

Tuner → Noise Gate → A/B Pedal
A: Volume Pedal → Tubescreamer → Guitar Head
B: EQ Pedal → Octaver → Bass Head

Using the EQ pedal to EQ out the high end so only the root notes would go through to the octaver and be played by the bass and using the volume pedal for parts in which I just want to play a bass line without guitar. Does this sound feasible? If so, any recommendations for an octaver/eq pedal/volume pedal? It would be for heavy, high gain music.
#2
I cant help with the chain, but for pedals the ehx Pog is great, so are some of the EQD iirc. Stay away from the boss pedals unless you want super gitchy tracking.
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#3
You could do it like that. However, the Micro POG has both a dry and wet out, so that's your A/B and the octave in one. Also, I think there are a few pedals that are able to isolate the lowest tones you are playing, I think BOSS makes one.
#4
^ these pedals you're talking about have digital tracking.
They will for the most part introduce a delay because they aren't built with high quality in mind as a goal.
Also they start acting pretty funny as soon as you play more than one note at a time.
Would not recommend for anything other than harmonies on the cheap.

TS, your idea is doable.
As will mentioned the micro pog will work good 'cause of the splitter.
It also sounds good enough and it doesn't introduce enough delay to be annoying.

Whatever volume pedal will be fine.
Also if ya ask me, with that setup you wouldn't even need an EQ.
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#5
Thanks for your help everyone. The Micro POG sounds very good with it's splitter. Would the EQ not still be necessary though? Say I wanted to play power chords on guitar but only have the root note played an octave lower.
#6
Quote by joshuadakin1
Thanks for your help everyone. The Micro POG sounds very good with it's splitter. Would the EQ not still be necessary though? Say I wanted to play power chords on guitar but only have the root note played an octave lower.


Won't work. It'll try to track everything.
#7
Yeah I get that it's polyphonic, I'm asking about the possibility of using an EQ pedal to remove information other than the lowest note
#8
Quote by joshuadakin1
Yeah I get that it's polyphonic, I'm asking about the possibility of using an EQ pedal to remove information other than the lowest note


Give that some thought.

Where do you set the EQ?
There's also this: most speaker cabinets can't reproduce some of the fundamentals of even a standard six-string guitar. A low open E is 82 Hz, but since most cabinets fall off rapidly below 110Hz, you're really identifying that note by the specific combination of harmonics that leads your ear to believe it's hearing the note itself.

Here's a trick that you can do if you have a Variax guitar (one of the new JTV ones). You can set the alternate tuning in the modeling section to an octave down on the low E string (each string can be set individually). You essentially have one bass string. The rest of the strings will play normally.

Taken a step further, the JTV Variax guitars mated with a Pod HD500 or Pro will allow you to use the VDI cable to run both the magnetic pickups and the modeled output to play together. You can actually separate the two and run models/alternate tunings through a bass (or a simulated bass "rig" on the Pod if you'd rather) and the magnetics through a second "rig". Since you've only got the one string downtuned electronically, you'll get that one string playing whatever you play on that (let's say the root of the chord?), the rest of the strings (modeled) playing whatever model you've got set up, and the magnetics playing normally.

I've routinely played with the bottom two strings tuned a full octave down (bass) and the top four tuned normally to allow me to play bass with my thumb and chords/lead with my fingers.
#9
I've given it plenty of thought thank you, I talked about the EQ pedals position in my first post and suggested a signal path. I wanted to know if anyone had any experience doing anything similar.
I appreciate the in depth response but what you've discussed is really not what I'm going for with this. I'm playing heavy, high gain music so splitting the guitar so I could use my thumb to play bass notes and other fingers to pluck the higher four strings wouldn't really be helpful.

As in the original post, the signal chain (including EQ pedal) would go something like this.

Tuner → Noise Gate → A/B Pedal
A: Volume Pedal → Tubescreamer → Guitar Head
B: EQ Pedal → Octaver → Bass Head

Note that the notes that are transposed an octave down would be going through a bass cabinet and not a guitar cabinet.
I figured letting the lows past and cutting much of the high end off would result in only the root knows going through to the Octaver pedal and hence only that being taken down an octave - which I hoped would mean as I bashed out power chords I would have the root note an octave lower coming out of a bass cabinet.
Last edited by joshuadakin1 at Apr 20, 2015,
#10
I think dspellman was just giving you his experience.

If you cut the highs and then go to the octaver, I would think you would get the best results that way.
Last edited by Will Lane at Apr 20, 2015,
#12
If you cut the highs with an EQ you're still gonna hear all notes in the chord, just without the highs.

what exactly are you trying to achieve?

You're best bet is probably to get something like a submarine pickup [http://www.submarinepickup.com/] and run that into an octaver &bass amp.

Or y'know get a bass player.
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Last edited by boblittle at Apr 23, 2015,
#13
Quote by boblittle
If you cut the highs with an EQ you're still gonna hear all notes in the chord, just without the highs.


Exactly.

You're trying to cut out all but the root fundamental of the chord you're playing.
Let's say you're playing something in C. The fundamental would be C at around 65.4Hz, and let's say that's the lowest note you're going to play. The rest of the chord is E at 82Hz and G at 98Hz. So if you COULD set an EQ pedal to cut sharply enough between 82Hz and 65.4Hz, you'd want to do that and then send only the 65.4Hz to the MicroPog, which would then convert that into a 32.7Hz octave-down bass note, right? And then you'd send that 32.7Hz off to a bass amp somewhere for reproduction.

Now since most rock music has a chord pattern of some kind (let's say a I-IV-V pattern, or in the above example, a C-F-G chord pattern), when you shifted to the F chord in that pattern (which features a root of 87.3Hz), you'd want to have the EQ *change* its selectivity to cut out everything above 87.3Hz (and below the A, which is at 110Hz). And then you'd want to do something similar to the G chord (cutting out everything above the root G, which is at 98 Hz).

Hopefully, you see the issue. Aside from the fact that no EQ pedal has a cutoff that sharp (most have octave cuts, which is far from what you want), any EQ that will allow the root of the V to ring will also let the third and the fifth of the I to ring as well.

You can't do what you want with what you're proposing. Won't happen.

Go back up to the Variax business and read carefully. All you came away with was "play two strings with the thumb and fingerpick the other four." You missed everything else.

The Variax (or a guitar with a hexaphonic MIDI pickup) can isolate a single string. It can send the output of that single string (let's say the bottom string) to anything you want. On the Variax guitar, however, it can send the output of that single string into pitch replacement technology built into the guitar. That pitch replacement technology can take that one string and output it an octave down (on the Variax side of things only), which is exactly where you want to be.

It's possible to use the Variax cable, send the magnetic pickup information (full guitar range) to one channel of a POD, send the variax information (one string bass information) to a second channel of a POD, and output them separately (one to a bass amp, one to a regular guitar amp). Job done.

No EQ required, no POG required.
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 23, 2015,