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#1
I saw someone playing an ibanez j custom and those fretboards are gorgeous so I looked into it and theyre over $4000!? Is this for collectors value, or is it an amazing guitar? Or just expensive for the sake of being expensive? What exactly is different about it than a $1000 guitar?
#2
Better build quality, better components, better materials, IMO some custom guitars are way overpriced
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#3
One reason that I can think of is custom shop guitars are probably made mostly by hand, where even some of the more expensive guitars outside of custom shops are factory made, or at least moreso. Labor pay for crafts like this is quite high.
#4
Good tonewood is expensive. Plus, a really good luthier will probably earn a whole lot more than minimum wage.

That said, a lot of custom guitars are quite overpriced. On the other hand some are worth it.

I have a Washburn US custom shop N5 which is close to perfect. It didn´t cost 4000 $ but 2000$ is also money.

Then, my Vigier Excalibur is the best guitar I´ve ever owned concerning playability. The only flaws the guitar has are the dings and dongs it has collected over the years. You really notice how much work was put into the making of that guitar.
#5
They cost so much money because that's how much people are willing to pay for them.

The markup of these guitars (and all guitars for that matter) is often several times higher than the labour and material costs to build it.
Quote by kentuckyklira
Good tonewood is expensive.

1. Compared to the price tag of the guitar? lolno. See above this quote for an explanation.
2. What is 'good tonewood' exactly anyway? It is an entirely subjective topic. High quality woods are measured by their weight and their appearance. Not on how they resonate.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 22, 2015,
#6
That's not quite true, good luthiers will do a 'tap test' to find wood that might sound better in an instrument. Obviously that wood doesn't cost any more, but paying someone to buy a bunch of wood and understand how to hand-pick the good stuff isn't free.

There is plenty of price inflation though, especially at the major brands. Ibanez wants their CS instruments to be special and exclusive, and there's plenty of demand for them, so they have no interest in selling you a guitar at a competitive price. They've got tons of production models for that. The Custom Shop is for people who don't really care how much it costs if it's exactly what they want. That's not a consumer-grade product. In a jaded sense, custom shop prices are so high to keep people like TS from kicking the tires. It's an easy way to keep the product exclusive.

Obviously they make very very good instruments, and some of the Custom Shop cost is to have someone with a ton of knowledge make your idea work and work well the first time, which is not easy. But they were never meant to be cost-effective instruments.

Plus, Custom Shop models aside, diminishing returns and knowledge base/R&D costs are real, as are dozens of other factors that you don't necessarily see or appreciate as a customer. Welcome to a market economy
#7
Quote by kentuckyklira
Good tonewood is expensive

Which is debatable if it's even true.

I had a Jackson Concept which sounded quite bad until I decided to install a Gotoh Floyd Rose and that guitar was singing like any other.
#8
One of a kind stuff- from cakes to cars and all things in between- generally costs more.

If the guitar is truly handmade- as many customs are- that's going to involve more hand crafting, which costs more than guitars made mostly via machinery. If a guitar is truly custom, there may be elements of its construction- mechanical or aesthetic or both- which are not sitting on a shelf after being made in mass quantities. Some things may have to be hand crafted and then the area into which they go may be hand routed to fit snugly.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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#9
Quote by Uncovered
Which is debatable if it's even true.

No, good tonewood IS expensive- that is objective fact.

Whether it has any effect on the tone of an electric? THAT is debatable.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
As people have said wood can be expensive a good buckeye burl top can cost up to $250 on its own for example. Hardware and and pickups are also expensive if you were to build a guitar yourself with top quality hardware your look at another $500 or so minimum. Then most company's have thousands of dollars invested in cnc machines and tools.

A hand built guitar takes somewhere between 20 and 50 hours to make so your also paying someone for there time to work on it.

Not to say every custom guitar is worth the money but this is why custom shop guitars start at about $2000 past That it depends on what you add to it and how much people are willing to pay for your brand name. Ibanez for example has no shortage of people willing to pay for there name on the headstock.
#12
Actually, small/1-man lutherie builds can start as low as just $1000, but that would be for one of their basic, standardized offerings. As you alter those designs or choose more exotic woods, for example, price will rise pretty rapidly.

If you go price a Carvin (semi-customizable) guitar, many of their designs start under $1000. But when people BUY a Carvin, they typically spend 50%+ more than that base price getting the optional features they want. Claro walnut, Koa and spalted maple cost more than ash, alder, maple or basswood. Quilts & flames cost more than opaque finishes. Metallic and complicated bursts cost more, too. Etc.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
Quote by TheStig1214

Sergio Aragones- the cartoonist- was once asked why it cost $50 to have him draw something at a convention when it took him only minutes to draw it. He responded, "You are not paying for the minutes it took me to draw it, you are paying for the years it took me to learn how to draw something like that in minutes."
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
The biggest thing is the labor. Almost any real "custom" guitar is going to built almost entirely by hand, and that is a high-skill labor. When you've got a custom hand built guitar, easily a couple thousand dollars of the price is just to pay the builder for his time. Then you consider the price of wood (which IS a lot, actually), and the fact that not many custom shops would bother building a custom guitar without using high-end, maybe even top-of-the-line components/hardware, and price tags of several thousand dollars do not seem out of place.

That's why you probably shouldn't bother trying to get a custom guitar unless you have something extremely specific and particular that you want out of it, which you can't get from any available production model. Otherwise, you can almost certainly find a production model from some company that will be pretty much exactly what you wanted to have custom made anyway.
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#15
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Sergio Aragones- the cartoonist- was once asked why it cost $50 to have him draw something at a convention when it took him only minutes to draw it. He responded, "You are not paying for the minutes it took me to draw it, you are paying for the years it took me to learn how to draw something like that in minutes."


Also this. So much this.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#16
It's the same with literally everything. Homes, cars, motorcycles, computers.
#17
not to mention that most everything that goes into mass produced guitars is to keep the costs low and adhere to consumer dictated price points (what we will pay for what we get). the goal is mostly to give the best bang for the buck while keeping the main goal profit. So we do get a hell of a good guitar but the jump to Custom Shop guitars pretty much throws that out the window.

We are saying, i have a lot of disposable income and i want to build the guitar i want at any cost. like not literally but pretty much putting in a custom guitar order means the guitars at the consumer level leave something to be desired and we are willing to pay for it. So pay for it you will do.
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#18
That's a 2000 fretboard. It's drawn and inflated by hand. Go see how much a tattoo that large would cost. This isn't really a hard question
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
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#19
A few years ago, you could get a new J. Custom for a lot less than the price of a current new JEM. I remember them being around $2100-2400 range. But at that time, you could get a Prestige for under $1000. I would say they're expensive for the sake of being expensive. My guess is that they can't keep up with the demand if the price was the same as it was a few years ago. Before, they were only sold in Japan. You had to import them if you wanted one. They were exclusive. They only started selling them worldwide for about 2 years.
#20
just like anything expensive, diminishing returns. why buy a patek phillipe watch? a timex tells time just fine.

you can buy a Carvin for 800 bucks that probably plays and sounds as good as most guitars costing 3000.

there are some things about custom guitars, just like a custom build time peice, that just are. they are amazing works of art. and you pay for them. and the extra 98th,99th,and 100th step that goes into them is the extra mile.
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#21
Supply and demand.

If people want a specific product, and are willing to pay a premium, a supplier is happy to oblige.

In order that the premium product is worth the extra money it needs to be better than the cheap product.

How the expensive product is better than the cheap product can be influenced by an almost infinite number of factors, better materials and components, more care, time and accuracy in assembly. Greater use of skilled labour to avoid faults and blemishes. Marketing and expectation. Ego.

I you can afford a guitar built by Eric Clapton's luthier, and want to brag about it, Fender will be willing to charge you for that exclusivity.

It is up to the supplier to provide sufficient added value that the buyer is willing to pay the premium.

However, it is not a foregone conclusion that the extra cost in producing a "special" product can be reflected in the price. Mass production is very, very cheap. Any small variance from a mass produced product is likely to be significant in cost.

Indeed a Bugatti Veyron costs the customer less than it costs VW to produce. Why do they do it then? The Halo effect. A Halo product will sell more cheap products by association.

Thus a Custom Shop guitar could be extremely good value because it may not be as profit loaded as a mass produced guitar.

How is it that mass production is cheap? Because skilled labour is expensive and changes take time. If you have a machine that will rout 20 bodies an hour being fed by a guy on minimum wage you have minimal cost for a body. If you then have a guy who chooses a piece of wood from a stack and decides which way round would look best and then reduces the cutting speed of the machine because the timber is more dense, checks it subsequently and rejects one or two because they aren't perfect, you might only produce 4 bodies an hour and are using a man with greater skill/cost. Ignoring the cost of the timber (which may be greater) that blank body already costs 7 times more than the massed produced body. And that is only one element.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
#22
Quote by John Sims


How is it that mass production is cheap? Because skilled labour is expensive and changes take time. If you have a machine that will rout 20 bodies an hour being fed by a guy on minimum wage you have minimal cost for a body. If you then have a guy who chooses a piece of wood from a stack and decides which way round would look best and then reduces the cutting speed of the machine because the timber is more dense, checks it subsequently and rejects one or two because they aren't perfect, you might only produce 4 bodies an hour and are using a man with greater skill/cost. Ignoring the cost of the timber (which may be greater) that blank body already costs 7 times more than the massed produced body. And that is only one element.


This is a pretty good explanation.
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#23
I recently priced a custom made guitar from a very good maker at around £2000. Some of the prices being charged by Gibson are getting out of hand. £4000 to £8000 is getting common. I have a Custom Shop Gibson acoustic and although it sounds great the workmanship isn't that good. I have a Chinese made Epiphone that is perfect!
#24
Quote by Roc8995
That's not quite true, good luthiers will do a 'tap test' to find wood that might sound better in an instrument. Obviously that wood doesn't cost any more, but paying someone to buy a bunch of wood and understand how to hand-pick the good stuff isn't free.

There is plenty of price inflation though, especially at the major brands. Ibanez wants their CS instruments to be special and exclusive, and there's plenty of demand for them, so they have no interest in selling you a guitar at a competitive price. They've got tons of production models for that. The Custom Shop is for people who don't really care how much it costs if it's exactly what they want. That's not a consumer-grade product. In a jaded sense, custom shop prices are so high to keep people like TS from kicking the tires. It's an easy way to keep the product exclusive.

Obviously they make very very good instruments, and some of the Custom Shop cost is to have someone with a ton of knowledge make your idea work and work well the first time, which is not easy. But they were never meant to be cost-effective instruments.

Plus, Custom Shop models aside, diminishing returns and knowledge base/R&D costs are real, as are dozens of other factors that you don't necessarily see or appreciate as a customer. Welcome to a market economy


All of this, especially the woods part. Tap tests or knocking the piece of wood for sound is something a machine can't do. There's a video floating around of how Paul Reed Smith makes Private Stock line instruments and he picks up several pieces of wood to tap them for the camera. Every single one literally rang like a bell. Machines can't pick those pieces of wood out, they can only measure size and weight.

Then the exclusivity factor, which is compounded by the fact that since most custom guitars are, in fact, custom made by a person and not a machine, no two instruments will be the same. You buy a custom shop instrument and you can be assured you have the only one in the world precisely like it.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
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Bitches be Crazy.

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#25
Quote by Acϵ♠
All of this, especially the woods part. Tap tests or knocking the piece of wood for sound is something a machine can't do. There's a video floating around of how Paul Reed Smith makes Private Stock line instruments and he picks up several pieces of wood to tap them for the camera. Every single one literally rang like a bell. Machines can't pick those pieces of wood out, they can only measure size and weight.

Then the exclusivity factor, which is compounded by the fact that since most custom guitars are, in fact, custom made by a person and not a machine, no two instruments will be the same. You buy a custom shop instrument and you can be assured you have the only one in the world precisely like it.


I was going to reference that video. I've seen it too and I thought it was hooey, frankly.

Machines can build PCBs with 100s of components, they can also test every component in minutes. Those things would take even the most skilled worker a very long time to do, guitars are easy mode for a CNC.

This is a good example:

The wood was very likely glued by hand and then it was hand placed on the CNC machine.

The CNC machine then:
Routes the wiring cavities
Shapes the body
Arches the top
Routes the binding slot
Routes the pickup cavities
Routes the neck pocket
Routes the pot holes
Routes the bridge holes.

All the big companies use CNC machines. I have seen the small builders who build from their own workshop but even they are using stuff like template router bits and CNC templates to allow them to essentially replicate work already done by a machine. I think of it as the difference between freehand drawing and tracing.
#26
Yes. But a machine can't recognize the quality or tonality of the wood. That's a human thing, i wasn't referencing the ability to cut the wood.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

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#27
1. There's little to no benefit of guitars being "handmade" vs. being CNC'd. In fact, it's probably the other way around. Acoustic guitars are not part of this discussion.
2. If you have to explain something about a guitar because you can't hear it, feel it or see it, it's probably not really worth paying extra for.
3. Tapping wood is a boondoggle for a solid body. I have bodies made of solid maple burl, aluminum, steel (whatever a Trussart is), plastic. They all sound like solid body guitars when you turn the amp on.
4. A truly custom guitar is not a modification of a manufacturer's standard guitar.
5. "One-off" may mean you're the only one stupid enough to want it that way. Everything is a one-off at Carvin. If it's a stupid modification that's likely to come back after the 10-day trial period (during which you'll realize how stupid you were), they'll call it an Option 50, charge you extra, and tell you that the guitar can't be returned. The extra money is because they're going to have to listen to you whine about it after they tried to talk you out of it.
6. A "one-off" from a manufacturer like Gibson usually means...well...nothing.
7. Beware of fancy names. Taylor's truly upper-crusty guitars are called "R Taylor" It's like food joints. You can tell how many more dollar signs you're going to have to pony up if the name is Bob's, Roberts, or Robaire's.
8. Sometimes the "custom guitars" from the "well-respected luthiers" who only crank out a dozen per year and have a 9-month waiting list are because the guy is drunk or in jail for the rest of the time. Beware of internet reviews written by idiots and/or guys who paid too much for the guitar because they didn't know any better.
9. If you suddenly can't get ahold of the "well-respected luthier" after nine months, kiss your money and your custom-built guitar goodbye. No whining. Just stand up, pull up your pants, tighten your belt and walk away.
10. Face it. You probably really don't need a custom guitar. You aren't that good, you don't really need whatever it is that's going to be "custom," and you really only wanted to tell someone else that you have a custom guitar.
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 24, 2015,
#28
Quote by MegadethFan18
I was going to reference that video. I've seen it too and I thought it was hooey, frankly.

Machines can build PCBs with 100s of components, they can also test every component in minutes. Those things would take even the most skilled worker a very long time to do, guitars are easy mode for a CNC.

This is a good example:

The wood was very likely glued by hand and then it was hand placed on the CNC machine.

The CNC machine then:
Routes the wiring cavities
Shapes the body
Arches the top
Routes the binding slot
Routes the pickup cavities
Routes the neck pocket
Routes the pot holes
Routes the bridge holes.

All the big companies use CNC machines. I have seen the small builders who build from their own workshop but even they are using stuff like template router bits and CNC templates to allow them to essentially replicate work already done by a machine. I think of it as the difference between freehand drawing and tracing.


Not the best comparison between electronic equipment and other instruments. Electronics are made from components that have been manufactured and tested under quality controls, with relatively tight tolerances. This makes automation easy as the outcome is highly repeatable and measureable. Since the raw materiasl (woods) used in guitar construction vary greatly, the outcome can also vary despite automated processes being used. There's still a good degree of hand work in a guitar as well. CNC does not provide surfaces ready for finishing for example, there's sanding left after the sahpe has been done.
Moving on.....
#29
Quote by dspellman
1. There's little to no benefit of guitars being "handmade" vs. being CNC'd. In fact, it's probably the other way around. Acoustic guitars are not part of this discussion.
2. If you have to explain something about a guitar because you can't hear it, feel it or see it, it's probably not really worth paying extra for.
3. Tapping wood is a boondoggle for a solid body. I have bodies made of solid maple burl, aluminum, steel (whatever a Trussart is), plastic. They all sound like solid body guitars when you turn the amp on.
4. A truly custom guitar is not a modification of a manufacturer's standard guitar.
5. "One-off" may mean you're the only one stupid enough to want it that way. Everything is a one-off at Carvin. If it's a stupid modification that's likely to come back after the 10-day trial period (during which you'll realize how stupid you were), they'll call it an Option 50, charge you extra, and tell you that the guitar can't be returned. The extra money is because they're going to have to listen to you whine about it after they tried to talk you out of it.
6. A "one-off" from a manufacturer like Gibson usually means...well...nothing.
7. Beware of fancy names. Taylor's truly upper-crusty guitars are called "R Taylor" It's like food joints. You can tell how many more dollar signs you're going to have to pony up if the name is Bob's, Roberts, or Robaire's.
8. Sometimes the "custom guitars" from the "well-respected luthiers" who only crank out a dozen per year and have a 9-month waiting list are because the guy is drunk or in jail for the rest of the time. Beware of internet reviews written by idiots and/or guys who paid too much for the guitar because they didn't know any better.
9. If you suddenly can't get ahold of the "well-respected luthier" after nine months, kiss your money and your custom-built guitar goodbye. No whining. Just stand up, pull up your pants, tighten your belt and walk away.
10. Face it. You probably really don't need a custom guitar. You aren't that good, you don't really need whatever it is that's going to be "custom," and you really only wanted to tell someone else that you have a custom guitar.


little cynical today are we . hey maybe if someone had taken the time to tap aluminum or plastic you'd have a truly amazing sounding alternate material guitar . internet reviews by guys who know nothing can be found at all price points.

now i don't really disagree on most of what you said. i can't see paying $5000 for a strat knowing that all i have to do is take some time and play a few "regular" ones to find a good one that suites me. i kind doubt i'll sound any better playing a john cruz masterbuilt.
#30
Quote by dspellman
1. There's little to no benefit of guitars being "handmade" vs. being CNC'd. In fact, it's probably the other way around. Acoustic guitars are not part of this discussion.
2. If you have to explain something about a guitar because you can't hear it, feel it or see it, it's probably not really worth paying extra for.
3. Tapping wood is a boondoggle for a solid body. I have bodies made of solid maple burl, aluminum, steel (whatever a Trussart is), plastic. They all sound like solid body guitars when you turn the amp on.
4. A truly custom guitar is not a modification of a manufacturer's standard guitar.
5. "One-off" may mean you're the only one stupid enough to want it that way. Everything is a one-off at Carvin. If it's a stupid modification that's likely to come back after the 10-day trial period (during which you'll realize how stupid you were), they'll call it an Option 50, charge you extra, and tell you that the guitar can't be returned. The extra money is because they're going to have to listen to you whine about it after they tried to talk you out of it.
6. A "one-off" from a manufacturer like Gibson usually means...well...nothing.
7. Beware of fancy names. Taylor's truly upper-crusty guitars are called "R Taylor" It's like food joints. You can tell how many more dollar signs you're going to have to pony up if the name is Bob's, Roberts, or Robaire's.
8. Sometimes the "custom guitars" from the "well-respected luthiers" who only crank out a dozen per year and have a 9-month waiting list are because the guy is drunk or in jail for the rest of the time. Beware of internet reviews written by idiots and/or guys who paid too much for the guitar because they didn't know any better.
9. If you suddenly can't get ahold of the "well-respected luthier" after nine months, kiss your money and your custom-built guitar goodbye. No whining. Just stand up, pull up your pants, tighten your belt and walk away.
10. Face it. You probably really don't need a custom guitar. You aren't that good, you don't really need whatever it is that's going to be "custom," and you really only wanted to tell someone else that you have a custom guitar.


but what if you really just want a custom guitar.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
#31
Quote by AcousticMirror
but what if you really just want a custom guitar.


then obviously you are an egotistical snob with more money then sense.
#32
Quote by monwobobbo
Quote by AcousticMirror
Quote by dspellman
Face it. You probably really don't need a custom guitar. You aren't that good, you don't really need whatever it is that's going to be "custom," and you really only wanted to tell someone else that you have a custom guitar.


but what if you really just want a custom guitar.


then obviously you are an egotistical snob with more money then sense.

*checks talent level vs quality & quantity of guitar collection*




STOP READING MY SOUL!!!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#33
Quote by 'DC fan
Better build quality, better components, better materials, IMO some custom guitars are way overpriced


Most custom guitars are overpriced then again I only buy used.
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Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
#34
Quote by dannyalcatraz
*checks talent level vs quality & quantity of guitar collection*




STOP READING MY SOUL!!!


Sorry, it was all a personal moment of introspection, after I checked MY talent level vs. Quality and quantity of guitar stack.
#35
Quote by Acϵ♠
Yes. But a machine can't recognize the quality or tonality of the wood. That's a human thing, i wasn't referencing the ability to cut the wood.


The video was a response to this part of the post.

Quote by Acϵ♠

Then the exclusivity factor, which is compounded by the fact that since most custom guitars are, in fact, custom made by a person and not a machine


I said I thought the PRS thing as hooey.
#36
Quote by dannyalcatraz
*checks talent level vs quality & quantity of guitar collection*




STOP READING MY SOUL!!!


if i had to check my talent vs quality and quantity of gear i'd be using a First Act starter pack

as for my soul i mortgaged that out years ago
#37
I'd be on a kazoo.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#38
I know this is the electric guitar forum, but I have a hand made (not custom) acoustic guitar that I would consider expensive and the build is next to none. You need to factor in the man hours it takes to build custom things and make them perfect, materials used etc.

I will agree with an above post that some are overpriced.
#39
No doubt that many if not most custom guitars are overpriced. But sometimes, you see/hear/experience the work of a true master and you have to think hard...

I have looked at & liked the guitars of Ernest Somogyi for years. His bare-bones guitars start at $20k.

Yes, $20,000 in real, American money.

But I also have heard them in action, played by pros. Specifically, I got to hear California Guitar Trio use a triad of identically made Somogyis more than once, but specifically and especially at a book store perfomance in Dallas. They were as close to me and the other attendees as someone on the other side of a largeish dinner table.

Drug one song in particular, each of the Trio played lead while the other 2 played complex but differing rhythm parts, then they would switch duties. IOW, each of the Trio played each of the 3 parts of the song at some point. What was stunning about that was that unless you were watching their hands or were sitting at a really oblique angle, it was next to impossible to tell which sounds originated from which guitar.

When you consider how different 2 supposedly identical production guitars can sound, that ES was able to make 3 guitars that sounded sooooooo similar is a revelation.

Since then, I have heard only a couple of other acoustics I'd put in the same class. Kevin Ryan guitars springs to mind.

Worth $20k? I don't know. But definitely worth paying a lot more than I have ever payed for a guitar.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 25, 2015,
#40
i have a 4k custom guitar that I don't even know how to play....
so ya, really should play for a bit before thinking you need something super custom.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
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