#1
I can tell that my guitar (strat) is definitely not properly intonated. I've read about *how* to set intonation but I must be doing something wrong.

I'm hooked up to a TC polytune. I play the harmonic at the 12th fret and make sure it's in tune. Then I fret the 12th fret--it's sharp on the G and D strings especially. However, when I adjust the saddle screw, the entire string falls out of tune accordingly. For example, if i tighten the string, the pitch increases and the fretted 12 is still sharp relative to the harmonic 12th, now they're just both very sharp. What am i doing wrong?
#2
You're having trouble because you shouldn't use the harmonic. You have to actually play the open note and then fret the note at the 12th. The open string should be in tune and then you adjust the intonation to make the note at the 12th perfectly in tune. And the string should go up in pitch. Then you tune it back down and re check the intonation. Repeat ad nauseam.

Intonating a guitar sucks and takes a while but pretty much as long as you keep the same gauge strings on the guitar in the same tuning you shouldn't have to do it often if at all.
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#3
When the intonation saddle moves back, you will force the string to stretch a longer span from the nut to the bridge, which will add tension to the string, making it go sharp. Vice versa when you move the saddle forwards.

Just re-tune the string.
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#4
Quote by TheStig1214
You're having trouble because you shouldn't use the harmonic. You have to actually play the open note and then fret the note at the 12th. The open string should be in tune and then you adjust the intonation to make the note at the 12th perfectly in tune. And the string should go up in pitch. Then you tune it back down and re check the intonation. Repeat ad nauseam.

Intonating a guitar sucks and takes a while but pretty much as long as you keep the same gauge strings on the guitar in the same tuning you shouldn't have to do it often if at all.


But won't adjusting the saddle length also change the pitch of the open string note?
#5
Quote by RyanMW2010
But won't adjusting the saddle length also change the pitch of the open string note?

Yes, that's why you retune and adjust and retune and adjust until you reach a point at which it's either perfect, you get bored, or you're happy with it.

As said, intonating a guitar is a bit of a pain, but it's a necessary thing.
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#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Yes, that's why you retune and adjust and retune and adjust until you reach a point at which it's either perfect, you get bored, or you're happy with it.

As said, intonating a guitar is a bit of a pain, but it's a necessary thing.


Haha, thanks. I saw that you had responded last and thought "oh no, Zaphod is going to yell at me for being so dumb." I appreciate the help as always. It's definitely a pain, but there are really few things more disgusting than an electric guitar with improper intonation.