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#1
we will call the "add -s or -es" schtick regular.
we will also call changes from f to v and /θ/ to /ð/ regular. not making that change we will call irregular
we will call "monkeys" regular.
will will consider anything else irregular

ok go

oxen
toronto maple leafs
monies
bacteria
i don't know why i feel so dry
#3
Quote by Eastwinn
toronto maple leafs

lmao




#4
formulae
what is up with that?
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#5
- Dildo
- People
- Wolf
- Shelf
- Man
- Woman
- Goose
- Mouse
- Deer
- Fish
- Criterion
- Medium
- Data
- Apex
- Rectum
- Matrix
- Octopus ( )
- Crisis
- Hypothesis
- Thief
- Wife
- Curriculum
- Ovum
Free Ali
#6
Quote by Pastafarian96
formulae
what is up with that?


it's a loan word from latin so people adhered to the latin rules for pluralizing nouns of that particular declension. i can't give you specifics cause i don't know latin. it's probably old enough that who even cares anymore?

cool plural:

cod
i don't know why i feel so dry
#7
Quote by chrismendiola
- Dildo
- Wolf
- Shelf
- Thief
- Wife


these are regular according to the op you didn't read
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
really though the team is named after a canadian wwi battalion.. hence "leafs" and not "leaves" fck yr english bud




#10
Quote by Eastwinn
it's a loan word from latin so people adhered to the latin rules for pluralizing nouns of that particular declension. i can't give you specifics cause i don't know latin. it's probably old enough that who even cares anymore?

I gotchu.

It's the first declension of six (I think) in Latin. Nouns that end with -a (normally feminine nouns) are generally pluralised as -ae. This is done in the nominative and vocative cases.
Quote by Eastwinn
these are regular according to the op you didn't read

Yeah, but I couldn't find any good reason why that should be considered regular. I do what I want.
Free Ali
#11
Quote by Eastwinn
it's a loan word from latin so people adhered to the latin rules for pluralizing nouns of that particular declension. i can't give you specifics cause i don't know latin. it's probably old enough that who even cares anymore?

cool plural:

cod

so the same with bacterium/bacteria.

fish is a ****ed up idea
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#13
cause you could fill the entirety of the pit with words like that. it's way more uncommon and cool for a word ending in f to just take an -s and not change. idk if that's the convention, but i also dc

phenomena
cactus sometimes
i don't know why i feel so dry
#14
Quote by Pastafarian96
so the same with bacterium/bacteria.

fish is a ****ed up idea


yeah, those are grammatically neuter and come from x declension (maybe chris will tell you)
i don't know why i feel so dry
#15
I say cactuses 'cause who the **** says cacti lol.

and I live in dirt and cactus land so I am a real authority on this subject.

sometimes I just say "all that cactus" though.
Last edited by slipknot5678 at Apr 23, 2015,
#17
Quote by Eastwinn
cause you could fill the entirety of the pit with words like that. it's way more uncommon and cool for a word ending in f to just take an -s and not change. idk if that's the convention, but i also dc

phenomena
cactus sometimes

Okay, fine.

How do you feel about the pluralisation of the word "octopus?" Many argue that it is "octopi," "octopodes," and "octopoden" claiming it has Latin roots. I've read it is etymologically rooted in ancient Greek but I know very, very little about Ancient Greek, so how should the word be pluralised (for the sake of pedantry)?
Free Ali
#18
automata yes good

automata comes from a type of noun in ancient greek (only thing i know about) called a substantive adjective (an adj turned into a noun) and it follows the 'tau-stem neuter' declension. the essential endings (if you use it as a subject) are -mat and -mata but -mat renders as -ma cause they didn't end words in t

lots of other words have this origin (problem, sperm) but do not necessarily have plural issues.

houses (pronunciation changes)
i don't know why i feel so dry
#19
monki
Quote by Sliide90027
But as a bigoted lemming, you have so cry an Alinslyite slur revealing you lack of reason and sense.


Quote by MusicLord16
BOB 1. ur 20 and two u like evil things and idk if u worship the devil
#20
Quote by chrismendiola
Okay, fine.

How do you feel about the pluralisation of the word "octopus?" Many argue that it is "octopi," "octopodes," and "octopoden" claiming it has Latin roots. I've read it is etymologically rooted in ancient Greek but I know very, very little about Ancient Greek, so how should the word be pluralised (for the sake of pedantry)?


octopuses sounds best to me.

the word is a compound of two greek words. those dudes were big into octopuses in their art but i don't think they used that word.

the words in question are okto and pous. i won't bother with the actual greek characters unless you wanna see them. okto just means 8 and like most but unfortunately not all of the numbers, it doesn't decline.

pous means foot. it's the same p in origin as pedestrian and other latin-derived ped- words in english. however, it's also the same in origin as the f in foot via something called grimm's law.

pous declines but a d suddenly appears in the other cases. that's cause pous is essentially *pods but greeks wouldn't end words in ds (or d for that matter) so it renders as pous. it's pronounced like poops but without the second p, btw. pous is actually paradigmatic wrt a larger type of noun essentially ending in d. it's not special

the anc. greek plural, in the nominative case, is podes. so this is why the "proper" plural is octopodes. but we are english speakers, not ancient greek speakers, and the complicated phonology that lets this happen is entirely missing in english. so imo just go with what you feel who cares

as a side note, grimms law also says that an inherented d may change to a t, so that explains the t in foot. BUT to be sure, pous and foot share a common ancestor, foot does not actually derive from pous.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#21
ok now that all that is out of the way let's get back to business

crematoria
i don't know why i feel so dry
#22
Quote by Eastwinn
octopuses sounds best to me.

the word is a compound of two greek words. those dudes were big into octopuses in their art but i don't think they used that word.

the words in question are okto and pous. i won't bother with the actual greek characters unless you wanna see them. okto just means 8 and like most but unfortunately not all of the numbers, it doesn't decline.

pous means foot. it's the same p in origin as pedestrian and other latin-derived ped- words in english. however, it's also the same in origin as the f in foot via something called grimm's law.

pous declines but a d suddenly appears in the other cases. that's cause pous is essentially *pods but greeks wouldn't end words in ds (or d for that matter) so it renders as pous. it's pronounced like poops but without the second p, btw. pous is actually paradigmatic wrt a larger type of noun essentially ending in d. it's not special

the anc. greek plural, in the nominative case, is podes. so this is why the "proper" plural is octopodes. but we are english speakers, not ancient greek speakers, and the complicated phonology that lets this happen is entirely missing in english. so imo just go with what you feel who cares

as a side note, grimms law also says that an inherented d may change to a t, so that explains the t in foot. BUT to be sure, pous and foot share a common ancestor, foot does not actually derive from pous.

nice!




#24
Quote by MinterMan22
really though the team is named after a canadian wwi battalion.. hence "leafs" and not "leaves" fck yr english bud

nice
Quote by Eastwinn
octopuses sounds best to me.

the word is a compound of two greek words. those dudes were big into octopuses in their art but i don't think they used that word.

the words in question are okto and pous. i won't bother with the actual greek characters unless you wanna see them. okto just means 8 and like most but unfortunately not all of the numbers, it doesn't decline.

pous means foot. it's the same p in origin as pedestrian and other latin-derived ped- words in english. however, it's also the same in origin as the f in foot via something called grimm's law.

pous declines but a d suddenly appears in the other cases. that's cause pous is essentially *pods but greeks wouldn't end words in ds (or d for that matter) so it renders as pous. it's pronounced like poops but without the second p, btw. pous is actually paradigmatic wrt a larger type of noun essentially ending in d. it's not special

the anc. greek plural, in the nominative case, is podes. so this is why the "proper" plural is octopodes. but we are english speakers, not ancient greek speakers, and the complicated phonology that lets this happen is entirely missing in english. so imo just go with what you feel who cares

as a side note, grimms law also says that an inherented d may change to a t, so that explains the t in foot. BUT to be sure, pous and foot share a common ancestor, foot does not actually derive from pous.

nerd
#26
this are men
Quote by Sliide90027
But as a bigoted lemming, you have so cry an Alinslyite slur revealing you lack of reason and sense.


Quote by MusicLord16
BOB 1. ur 20 and two u like evil things and idk if u worship the devil
#27
Quote by chrismendiola
We need a Germanic enthusiast in here to complete the trio.

You rang?

I'm not a good one at all though
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#28
Quote by Pastafarian96
You rang?

I'm not a good one at all though

Post irregular plural words that stem from Germanic nouns and/or Germanic grammatical rules.
Free Ali
#29
Quote by Eastwinn
automata comes from a type of noun in ancient greek (only thing i know about) called a substantive adjective (an adj turned into a noun) and it follows the 'tau-stem neuter' declension. the essential endings (if you use it as a subject) are -mat and -mata but -mat renders as -ma cause they didn't end words in t

lots of other words have this origin (problem, sperm) but do not necessarily have plural issues.

We've talked about this before but some language dork who's as language dorky as us might find this interesting: in Portuguese, most nouns that end in -a are feminine and most nouns that end in -o are masculine. And if you think about exceptions to that general rule, most of them are nouns that end in -ma but are masculine (and most nouns ending in -ma, such as 'problema', 'sistema' or 'tema', are indeed counterintuitively masculine), and it turns out they come from that particular Greek construction.

now that's linguistics
#31
Quote by sickman411
We've talked about this before but some language dork who's as language dorky as us might find this interesting: in Portuguese, most nouns that end in -a are feminine and most nouns that end in -o are masculine. And if you think about exceptions to that general rule, most of them are nouns that end in -ma but are masculine (and most nouns ending in -ma, such as 'problema', 'sistema' or 'tema', are indeed counterintuitively masculine), and it turns out they come from that particular Greek construction.

now that's linguistics

This is the same in Spanish. That's cool to know, now I've got some extra #fax about #linguistix.
Free Ali
#32
Quote by chrismendiola
Post irregular plural words that stem from Germanic nouns and/or Germanic grammatical rules.

Clothing (obviously we also have 'clothes') - presumably taken from German 'Kleidung'
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#33
explain men to me
Quote by Sliide90027
But as a bigoted lemming, you have so cry an Alinslyite slur revealing you lack of reason and sense.


Quote by MusicLord16
BOB 1. ur 20 and two u like evil things and idk if u worship the devil
#36
Children
Media
Possi
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Facesitting is a violation of freedom of speech, because how can you speak when you have an ass covering your face?
#37
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Clothing (obviously we also have 'clothes') - presumably taken from German 'Kleidung'


cloth vs clothes was covered in the op with the fancy symbols.

that said, maths.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#38
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
explain men to me

Like I implied, I'm not too well-read on Germanic linguistics, but I'm pretty sure "man" and its permutations are etymologically rooted in German.

I could be wrong, but IIRC...

German → English

Mann → man
Männer → men

Here's the short explanation.

Here's some historical context:
There is no character ä in English so the pronunciation of ä was adapted to fit the language and instead, used the letter e. Germans used ä to replace æ because of a change in alphabet. The character æ is the root of the Germanic umlaut ä. The following vowel is emphasised more in pronunciation, which is where we get "men."

Disclaimer: I'm doing that from memory so I could be talking shit.

EDIT: I think Germanic umlauts also explain how foot's plural is feet.
Free Ali
Last edited by chrismendiola at Apr 23, 2015,
#39
I say smurves and I say milves because of wolves and of elves
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#40
Quote by chrismendiola
Like I implied, I'm not too well-read on Germanic linguistics, but I'm pretty sure "man" and its permutations are etymologically rooted in German.

I could be wrong, but IIRC...

German → English

Mann → man
Männer → men

Here's the short explanation.

Here's some historical context:
There is no character ä in English so the pronunciation of ä was adapted to fit the language and instead, used the letter e. Germans used ä to replace æ because of a change in alphabet. The character æ is the root of the Germanic umlaut ä. The following vowel is emphasised more in pronunciation, which is where we get "men."

Disclaimer: I'm doing that from memory so I could be talking shit.

EDIT: I think Germanic umlauts also explain how foot's plural is feet.

I don't think you're talking shit but I'm doing it from memory too and it's been a while since I thought about any of this.

can confirm foot-feet thing tho
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
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