#1
So just wondering others thoughts..

In a band situation where everyone contributes(ex the lead guitarist writes the leads/the drummer writes the drum patterns etc)..how open minded should one be?

at what point do you say: hey im creative too..you play your instrument and ill play mine.

or is that a bad attitude to have? in the long run is it important to give in to the people who want write every part...or should you stand your ground?

assume that everyone knows what they are doing and nobody is playing distastefully

also if there is one person who only wants to record and not play any shows and everyone else wants to play shows...what do you do?
#2
Why wouldn't you let your drummer write guitar riffs if he has ideas for them? A song is more than a collection of parts. The parts need to work together, and to make them work together, you need to talk about them. Does this bassline fit the guitar riff? Could the bass do something different? Could the guitars just play long chords? Would this be a good place for a short drum solo? Things like that.

I usually tell our drummer what to play. Of course I'm not going to notate everything he should play, but I'm going to give him an idea of the drum beat I'm after, because that's pretty important part when it comes to the groove of the song. If he has some ideas, I of course listen to him. I'm the bassist in our band, and when I write songs, I write for the whole band. They can of course tweak their parts, but we need to make sure everything fits together.

I don't know about the second question. You could talk about it. Talk about your goals. If he doesn't want to perform and everybody else does, you may want to replace him. If you enjoy playing with him, start another band, but keep jamming with him.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
yea word up.

its more about this:

"give someone an inch, and they take a mile"

it is both fortunate and unfortunate that i am in a band with all very good and creative musicians. all chiefs, no indians.
#4
If I have written the song, I usually have a good image of how it should sound so the band members should pretty much play what I tell them to play. Though I usually record a demo version of the song to give an idea of the sound to the other members. But yeah, after that we may start thinking what we could add to the song. If somebody has an idea, I of course listen to him. If it sounds good, we may add it to the song. Well, first we start playing it and try to follow the demo version, but after we can play it, we may get more ideas.

So yeah, if you write a song, make a demo version of it and tell the band that's how you want it to sound like. It's important that every member has a similar vision of the song and plays it similarly. Because if everybody plays it differently, it won't sound good.

Sometimes our songs sound way different from the demo versions when they are played with the whole band, but I think that's OK, as long as everybody plays it similarly. Everybody adds their own twist to it.

I think some kind of instructions are always necessary. For example if some part needs a double or half time feel or if some part needs a break somewhere or the band to accent certain notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Depends how the idea has been developed. For example, if the creative idea is just a riff that the guitar player has come up with in his room, then it should be pretty fair game, with everyone chipping in their own parts, or suggesting little ideas for other instruments - this works better if people in the band play more than one instrument, so they can sympathise with how the instrument works/responds.

If the song has been brought, almost fully formed, by a single member, they should be open minded enough to accept critique and suggestions from other band members, but sadly this is easier said than done - a great deal of personal pride over songs is hard to get over sometimes.

If one member of your band writes all parts and will not back down, it really depends on how good the songs are - in your collective opinion. Also, it means that if the band breaks down, only they will have the right to recycle the songs (speaking morally, of course, but also if they copyright them, legally too).

To your second question - if it will create tension in the long run, make it clear to that person that everyone else intends to play shows. You could always just ask them to play on recordings, and have a stand in to play live, but this creates more unnecessary trouble - what if the live musician wants to join/contribute, or if they want to be credited as a member, instead of the person who just plays on recordings.

In a band, everyone should have a similar goal, in a perfect world. Everyone should agree, regardless of how you choose to resolve both issues.
#6
Granted that everyone in the band is mature enough to follow it, the voting system works. If someone shows up with almost an entire song written out, call a vote on whether or not any changes should be made. Majority wins, end of question.

Second question- if his contributions are great, keep him as a studio member and find someone else to play his parts live. If he contributes little, kick him out and find someone with the same goals as everyone else. I don't understand why anyone wouldn't want to play out though, personally.