#1
If I were to get a new bridge and tailpiece, how do I go about finding out if I need small or large posts?
#2
Tell us what guitar you have, or post a picture. Most import guitars have the large posts, most USA Gibsons have the small posts, but there are plenty of exceptions. If you look at a few next to each other it's pretty easy to tell the difference between large and small post.

Of course, if you're replacing the inserts then it doesn't matter. You can also check the post threading and drop whatever you want into the existing inserts if the threads match. Decent quality bridges often come with posts and inserts.
#3
I agree, if you are matching the color just replace the height adjustment portion and the physical bridge. All the years I modified guitars and did aftermarket upgrades as a side business my first few years out of high school I never pulled a single stud insert out.

by the way I highly recommend the Schaller roller tuneomatic and if you re-string your stoptail do it backwards like Billy Gibbons. It gives you arguably more tone sustain (as if it matters) , I'd like to imagine more tuning stability and better bends. The subject came up a lot on the les paul forum when I googled this as it is still something new to me as I've never owned a les paul in months.

it'll look something like this Just remember to intonate the bridge saddles if you re-string like this
#4
Quote by Tallwood13

by the way I highly recommend the Schaller roller tuneomatic and if you re-string your stoptail do it backwards like Billy Gibbons. It gives you arguably more tone sustain (as if it matters) , I'd like to imagine more tuning stability and better bends. The subject came up a lot on the les paul forum when I googled this as it is still something new to me as I've never owned a les paul in months.

it'll look something like this Just remember to intonate the bridge saddles if you re-string like this


The top-wrapping question evokes more face-palms and derision than earnest posts these days on MLP. Mostly the consensus is that there IS no consensus, and no one has managed to prove that there's a benefit one way or the other. It is helpful to top wrap if the construction of your LP left your bridge way up in the air, but a well-put-together guitar doesn't care. Sorry, no better tone no more tuning stability, and bends don't bendifit (see what I did there). Folks have been doing it both ways since the late '60's.

If you like it, do it. If you like it better the other way, great.