#1
What should every guitarist know about tremolo systems?

1) How to properly test one?
2) What are the main types?
3) What should you consider when choosing between the types?
4) What are the constructional compromises should you take when creating one?
#2
tunig stability is probably the main thing when talking trems. oh and what you want to do with it in terms of how extreme will the use be.

basic types come down to 2. Locking and non - Locking. a locking trem has a clamp at the nut the locks the strings in place. most loking trems have fine tuners at the bridge for limited tuning. non- locking or traditional trems have a regular nut (although there are some nuts like a roller nut that are different) and are generally more limited in how much they can do.

Locking Trems usually a Floyd Rose (or variation) or a Kahler. these are designed to staty in tune even with extreme use. they also are able to deliver greater pitch changing range without going out of tune. the down side is that changing tunings is a bigger hassle and there is often some loss of sustain. when set to float (pull up or push down) if a string breaks then the rest of the strings will go out of tune.

Non Locking trems are usually a Fender Style ( 6 screw or 2 post) or a Bigsby style. bigsby style trems are meant for subtle use and really won't do the "dive bomb" thing. they are very stiff in feel. the Fender style is probably the best known trem and works well when set up correctly. it's range isn't as much as a typical floyd so it is limited when it comes to dive bombs and other more extreme trem uses. tuning stability is a huge issue with both of these styles of trems. the string often bind at the nut causing strings to go out of tune. any string slippage at teh tuners will also cause tuning issues (this is why the locking nut was invented).

trems are really fun and can be a very expressive tool. they can also be a pain in the ass when first learning to use them.
#4
1) Biggest thing is that after an extreme dive or pull up is that the guitar stays in tune.
2) Floyd Rose (floating trem, sits on a 2 point pivot, can go down or down and up depending on the route), Kahler (also floating, sits on a barrel spring, typically goes down and up, strings go over roller saddles and lock into the pivot behind those saddles), generic strat type (similar to Floyd functionally, strings come through bottom of trem through sustain block, typically only does down unless you set it up or route it to float) and Bigsby (replaces a stop tailpiece on a TOM bridge, strings go through it and over TOM bridge, depressing the bar rolls the end of the strings over it and loosens them).

Floyd: http://www.jerrock.com/66/system/files/Image/Guitare/Les_pieces_2008/Vibratos_08/Floyd_rose_08/vibrato/vibrato_floyd_rose_roulement_a_billes_vigier_big.jpg

Kahler: http://d1gd7xtq3dij0r.cloudfront.net/d_28050.gif

Strat Trem: http://www.12fret.com/wp-content/gallery/shop_strat_trem_setup/Shop_strat_trem_bridge_top_2.jpg

Bigsby: http://guitars.com/sites/default/features-archive/335chbigsby/EH5830bigsby.jpg

3) It's all about preference, but in general the Kahler and Floyd are build more for extreme dives and pull ups, the strat type with give you a fair amount of dive and the Bigsby can get a little unstable if you try to move it around a ton.

4) Creating one? Like milling a trem from scratch? I would say not to when it's so much easier just to buy a kit and install one. If you mean installing one than the Floyd and Kahler typically also require installing a locking nut, which means modifying the neck a fair amount. Also you need to route a cavity in your guitar for most of them. The Bigsby is a top mount system and doesn't require any routing but as I stated above it won't give you as much range and isn't as durable in extreme situations.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#5
Quote by paveld500
What should every guitarist know about tremolo systems?

1) How to properly test one?
2) What are the main types?
3) What should you consider when choosing between the types?
4) What are the constructional compromises should you take when creating one?


Sort of a book required to answer that one.

There are a whole bunch of designs (not just two), including some originally designed from motorcycle bits, one that requires you to squeeze the handle side to side, a few that operate off pedals on the ground, a few that operate off pushing the guitar down on its strap, some that selectively change pitch on just a couple of strings but not all and much much more.

Testing and choosing and construction all depend on which you're looking at and what you want to accomplish.
#6
Quote by dspellman
Sort of a book required to answer that one.

There are a whole bunch of designs (not just two), including some originally designed from motorcycle bits, one that requires you to squeeze the handle side to side, a few that operate off pedals on the ground, a few that operate off pushing the guitar down on its strap, some that selectively change pitch on just a couple of strings but not all and much much more.

Testing and choosing and construction all depend on which you're looking at and what you want to accomplish.


yeah there are more designs but i choose to stick with the most common ones found on guitars these days. you're right though a really good answer to those ?s would requier way more time and typing than i would want to give (and i'm bored at work).
#7
i have an sg original with a lyre tremolo system & i love it ,,its not made for extreme,,but it does subtle great as long as you dont mistreat it ,,it wont mistret you ,,the tuning issues usually lye in the nut & saddle & still even after a light buffing on both ends it still tends to come out of tune ,,not real sever but enoght for me to notice & that can be cured witha n.02 pencil lead on the & the saddle if you like ,,,,just loosen the string that has the tuning issues & fill the gap in with lead or a very fine graphite powder wich can be a tad messy but just blow it off lightly after resetting the string in the slot
#8
when even we go to buy a guitar we have need to consider about the good quality and best or easy to use...Even i also get to know so many ideas from these all posts...
#9
Oddly enough, the best one I have tried came as a stock item on my 1966 Teisco del Rey model MJ-2L. It is much smoother and stays in tune far better than the one on my Strat, and it can actually be used to generate a smooth vibrato effect rather than motorcycle sounds (which it can also do).