#1
Hi,

I know this isn't directly guitar related, but I was wondering if anyone can recommend any vocal pedals that allow big reverbs/delays?

I was thinking about just using the Boss RV-5 but figured that it might kill the vocal signal?

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks.
#3
Try the TC Helicon stuff, plenty of good vocal specific pedals there
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#4
GABarrie beat me to it, but I'd have to recommend the TC Helicon stuff above almost everything else. There should be a lot of it available used.
#5
On the cheap, check out an old Alesis Quadraverb.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#8
Quote by GABarrie
Try the TC Helicon stuff, plenty of good vocal specific pedals there


Thanks for the tip. My only worry with these is that they might not have settings that with 'big' modulated sounds for the vocals as I'm not too interested in the basic reverb settings.
#9
Well, TC are the masters of reverb. Now all of these have "big" reverb settings but what your version of "big" reverb is, it might differ from mine.
Why don't you just watch a few product reviews on Youtube? DIgitech Vocalist, TC Helicon, etc.?
#12
Quote by GABarrie


That does sound great to be fair. The first and last settings are probably the 'big' reverbs I was looking for.

Anyone know how to connect a vocal to the Electro Harmonix Cathedral?
#13
the voice tone r1 actually has a mic input.
you would need a xlr to 1/8 adapter for the cathedral.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#14
Quote by jacko_17
That does sound great to be fair. The first and last settings are probably the 'big' reverbs I was looking for.

Anyone know how to connect a vocal to the Electro Harmonix Cathedral?

Get a mixer or something. Plug your microphone into the mixer. Have a 1/4" coming out of your mixer, plug it into the Cathedral. Bam. They have teeny tiny 1 channel mixers with 3 band EQ, I'm sure you can find something!
Or you can just get an XLR>1/4" converter, but your voice won't be very amplified. A mixer will allow you to make yourself louder or quieter as needed, and has EQ built in.

Personally, I just use my mixer to get some grimy reverb. I have an old(ish) Alesis 8-channel mixer and it does 10 different kinds of reverb and is packed with a bunch of other effects (pitch, chorus, flange, combinations, etc.)

The reverb gets really heavy on my Alesis mixer. And if I want to plug it into more pedals, I can by plugging a 1/4" into the headphones jack and them plugging that into my pedals.
Unfortunately, a mixer is not a pedal, and you'll have to turn a knob or two to get your heavy reverb. But I like knob turning so that's ok for me

That's all I got
#15
Quote by SunshineMusicO
Get a mixer or something. Plug your microphone into the mixer. Have a 1/4" coming out of your mixer, plug it into the Cathedral. Bam. They have teeny tiny 1 channel mixers with 3 band EQ, I'm sure you can find something!
Or you can just get an XLR>1/4" converter, but your voice won't be very amplified. A mixer will allow you to make yourself louder or quieter as needed, and has EQ built in.

Personally, I just use my mixer to get some grimy reverb. I have an old(ish) Alesis 8-channel mixer and it does 10 different kinds of reverb and is packed with a bunch of other effects (pitch, chorus, flange, combinations, etc.)

The reverb gets really heavy on my Alesis mixer. And if I want to plug it into more pedals, I can by plugging a 1/4" into the headphones jack and them plugging that into my pedals.
Unfortunately, a mixer is not a pedal, and you'll have to turn a knob or two to get your heavy reverb. But I like knob turning so that's ok for me

That's all I got


Thanks for the advice.

But my issue is that I'd be looking to use it live so would be going through the pedal and fed through to the mixer for the soundman to deal with (or through to the PA in practices).

Are there any adaptors or converters (instead of the 1/4 adaptor) that don't suck the volume etc?

Many thanks.
#16
Depends on the mixer, you can have one with XLR outs.

As far as the reverb itself, you'd be running it in the fx loop of the mixer (send/return) so 1/4 will work for that as you'd be blending it to your mic signal. You could possibly bring the effect (reverb) back on another mixer input channel, I do it that way so I can eq that and use the sliders. So say aux1->reverb unit input->reverb return into stereo channel input on the mixer.

I still think you'd do a lot better with a pedal as that can simplify the setup much further.

Honestly, most places should be able to provide that kind of reverb, you just tell to soundman to give you wide echo, they usually have them on tap. Might take 2 more minutes in soundcheck but it is kinda redundant to bring in a whole setup with mixer and outboard.
#17
Quote by diabolical
Depends on the mixer, you can have one with XLR outs.

As far as the reverb itself, you'd be running it in the fx loop of the mixer (send/return) so 1/4 will work for that as you'd be blending it to your mic signal. You could possibly bring the effect (reverb) back on another mixer input channel, I do it that way so I can eq that and use the sliders. So say aux1->reverb unit input->reverb return into stereo channel input on the mixer.

I still think you'd do a lot better with a pedal as that can simplify the setup much further.

Honestly, most places should be able to provide that kind of reverb, you just tell to soundman to give you wide echo, they usually have them on tap. Might take 2 more minutes in soundcheck but it is kinda redundant to bring in a whole setup with mixer and outboard.


I don't know much about this sort of thing, but would a DI box or a preamp box? (Excuse me if these two options sound ridiculous, I have 1% of an idea as to what they actually are!!! )

Thanks!
#19
For mic you'd need a preamp. The vocal processors I mentioned usually have that built in, so in essence they are one channel of a mixer with effects processing.

As a former sound man, I prefer to get my mic signal at source, i.e. straight from the mic.
Then I would add vocal effects at the FOH and mix monitor. I had a few processors at the time, with one reverb dedicated to vocals.

Anything else in between was usually a mess. Nowadays, vocalists can provide their own sounds, coming from the fact that autotune is becoming prevalent as well, so a lot of people are starting to hide technique behind effects. So, that's where the Helicon and similar come from, and they plug in as guitar DIs. Just expect that any sound stage would expect XLR out, so that's where you need to be after your whole chain.

That Pigtronix pedal should work, I think it'll take a dynamic mic head on so you don't need a preamp but honestly, I don't see why take this over any of the packaged vocal processors that'll be a lot easier to operate.

If cost is an issue, look at these:
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VE-1
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VTHarmonyGXT
Last edited by diabolical at Apr 28, 2015,
#21
Quote by diabolical
For mic you'd need a preamp. The vocal processors I mentioned usually have that built in, so in essence they are one channel of a mixer with effects processing.

As a former sound man, I prefer to get my mic signal at source, i.e. straight from the mic.
Then I would add vocal effects at the FOH and mix monitor. I had a few processors at the time, with one reverb dedicated to vocals.

Anything else in between was usually a mess. Nowadays, vocalists can provide their own sounds, coming from the fact that autotune is becoming prevalent as well, so a lot of people are starting to hide technique behind effects. So, that's where the Helicon and similar come from, and they plug in as guitar DIs. Just expect that any sound stage would expect XLR out, so that's where you need to be after your whole chain.

That Pigtronix pedal should work, I think it'll take a dynamic mic head on so you don't need a preamp but honestly, I don't see why take this over any of the packaged vocal processors that'll be a lot easier to operate.

If cost is an issue, look at these:
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VE-1
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VTHarmonyGXT



Thanks for the help, much appreciated!!!
#23
I have been using a Digitech Vocalist II for years. It has a very nice built in Digitech reverb and compressor in it though I don't use the compressor. It is mainly a harmonizer that creates three part harmony by interpreting the chords you are playing on your guitar and creates two additional harmonies using your lead voice as the sample (two more of you doing harmony). It has low impedence in and out for your mic and the unit has a guitar in and out so you can just plug your guitar in and go from the out to your amp (pedals etc.) The reverb in it is pretty decent and the unit works great and creates nice harmonies with no noticeable delay. You can buy older versions like mine on EBay for about $150.00 or less which is what a decent reverb alone will cost. TC Helicon modals do the same thing and are also very good (maybe better, but cost more in most cases). You might think about it. Kill two birds with one stone.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 29, 2015,