#1
So i've decided to get my jazz chops back, so i'm doing a harmonic analysis. I pretty much have the whole song but i've come to this question:

What's the function of the Dm7b5 on the third bar? (i'm reaaaaally rusty on harmonic analysis)

EDIT: Song is in Ab major

Last edited by deluxity at Apr 30, 2015,
#2
I would say it's just a secondary dominant for Eb.
Quote by AlanHB
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#4
Or maybe...

Dm7b5 is D F Ab C, which is basically Fm6 (F Ab C D), which is basically just "extending" that Fm7.

Any opinions on that?
#7
If I may:

Dm7b5 an extension of Fm6 because the root is D, the 6th of F. Non-1 3 5 or 7 tones in the bass are roots. It's an honest to goodness D chord.

We are in the key of Fminor. That makes F minor I.

YESSSS, We leave that key immediately. YES, we end in Ab major. But right now, Fm.

C7 is V here.

Any chord can be preceded with it's dominant. G7b9 is V of Cm and therefore V/V.

Any Dom7 chord (including V) can be preceded with its related II chord. So we can put the II (Dm7b5) in front of its V (G7b9).

The tricky part is, other than it being a related II chord, this chord has ZERO function in the key of Fm. So we don't analyze it.

HOWEVER,

You could also make a case (because of Melodic Minor) for Dm7b5 being VIm7b5 in a minor key, which is correct, but in this case less accurate as it is part of a II-V unit.

What you want is this:

Fm - Dm7b5 - G7b9 - C7

I - Related II of G7 (you can also write nothing here) - V7/V - V7

BUT this is a close second:

I - VIm7b5 - V7/V - V7


Now, If I was your harmony teacher, I'd mark those both right, but I'd totally prefer the first one. But that isn't here or there.

P.S.

Before the lynch mob comes after me, there has (or is being had) a shift in pop/jazz roman numeral analysis in the industry where we are moving toward using all uppercase letters. It's easier to read, and the major/minor/diminished status of the chords is easily indicated as such:

Xmaj7

Xm7

Xdim7

X7

Xm7b5

This cuts down on confusion, especially when reading handwritten charts where this can get hard to read.


P.P.S. I see you've already bracketed your II-V's. Berklee would be so proud right now.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
^ TS was talking about the Dm7b5 before the Bbm7-Eb7.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
You still have to look at it in Fm, so it's viø. The Bbm7 is your pivot chord, f: iv7, Ab: ii7. In the first appearance, the Dm7b5 is both viø (in f) and iiø (in C, as part of the little ii V I as Jet explained).
#10
^ Thanks for fixing that.

Before G7, it functions as the related II in that II-V.

Before Bbm7, its VIm7b5.

Hopefully my ramblings were still helpful.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
@Jet_Penguin Now that was some broad explanation, thanks. And lol at berklee being proud of me

Thank you too @harmosis and @MaggaraMarine
#13
Exactly, we tend to analyze the II-V's as a unit, so if the II does not have any function in the preceding key, like:

Cmaj7 - Ebm7 - Ab7 - Dbmaj7


We leave it blank and call it a related II.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
Schenker's a hack, and his system was designed to aid performance, not analysis.

#shotsfired
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#17
No you could look at the Dm7b5 like an enharmonic sub for Bb9/D.

They both take the same Melodic Minor. (F)
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#18
This is really helpful. been analyzing minor harmony once and for all. Really appreciate the knowledge herein. In the first instance of dm7b5, where it acts as ii of G7, we could also sub in--after the dm7b5 --a db9(7) as a tritone substitute for the G7 and you get a nice chromatic move down from d-db/c#-c in the bass. Heck you could sub it in the second instance where dm7b5 is vi in F melodic minor as long as you slide the opposite direction back up to the eb7...as long as you dont stay on Db7 for more than a couple beats, Db7 shares two chord tones with Bb-7: Db and F...so it's in the ballpark. It sounds a little outside but it sounds cool. 
#19
Mm
Dm7b5 acts as ii of C, G7 acting as dominant
Tritone substitute is bII7, Db7, not #I7
Dm7b5 to Eb7 is viiø7 of Eb
Db7 and Bbm7 share three notes

This thread is two years old, please don't bump such threads