#1
How long did it take you?

I am again to learn the fret board again... This time I am using an approach used by one of the online courses. Basically learning the A minor pentatonic up and down each string and by position by Name and Degree. Then fleshing that out by adding extra intervals that work with the minor Pentatonic, basically the Composite Blues Scale.

Do people like Joe Bonamassa, Eric Johnson have like a photographic memory? Is that what set these players apart from us mere mortals?
#2
No. they remember the same way you remember what your name is and how to eat without missing your mouth.

Everything's easy after you do it a million times.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#3
Quote by wiggedy
How long did it take you?

I am again to learn the fret board again... This time I am using an approach used by one of the online courses. Basically learning the A minor pentatonic up and down each string and by position by Name and Degree. Then fleshing that out by adding extra intervals that work with the minor Pentatonic, basically the Composite Blues Scale.

Do people like Joe Bonamassa, Eric Johnson have like a photographic memory? Is that what set these players apart from us mere mortals?


If you want to speed this up, realise that you are learning interval shapes. Not sure I agree with doing this one string at a time as above .. since most shapes involve two strings (not necessarily adjacent), and you will recognise these everywhere, visually (in scales and chords). Everyone I've taught has learned these shapes within a week, only spending a few minutes a day ... they are that simple.

This may help you: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html

Good luck, Jerry
#4
What may help is understanding how the minor scale is constructed and how it sounds like. That way you don't just memorize random fingerings - the fingerings get more meaning. But yeah, I would say the scale shapes are pretty much just muscle memory (but as I said, if you understand about scale construction, the shapes become way more logical - you understand where they come from). It's really not photographic memory. You need to have them under your fingers. I mean, good players can play without looking at the fretboard.

An important thing is to pay attention to the sound, not just learn the fingerings.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine

An important thing is to pay attention to the sound, not just learn the fingerings.


This

If you are improvising or composing, it doesn't make sense to know where F or Ab is if you don't really know the sound of the intervals.

Still, if you're reading sheet music, knowing where every note is, is a must.

I used to just sit down and say: Ok, let's find all the G notes in every string. Then i just thought of another random note and did the same thing, over and over again for months. At a certain point i just knew where to find every note. No photographic memory needed
#6
Fretboard autopsy from rusty Cooley helped me a lot. If you want something free you could just head over to all-guitar-chords and go to scales and learn the patterns/ positions of a scale that way.
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#7
it's a lot of muscle memory, and just general practice :shrug:
will someone carry me across ten thousand miles under the silence
#8
Quote by wiggedy
How long did it take you?

I am again to learn the fret board again... This time I am using an approach used by one of the online courses. Basically learning the A minor pentatonic up and down each string and by position by Name and Degree. Then fleshing that out by adding extra intervals that work with the minor Pentatonic, basically the Composite Blues Scale.

Do people like Joe Bonamassa, Eric Johnson have like a photographic memory? Is that what set these players apart from us mere mortals?


How long did it take me? 12 years. But it was that journey that lead to understanding the best way to teach it.

Your online approach sounds....clunky to my ear.

I guess that's because with most students, I teach it to proficiency in two to four days. When I say "proficiency" I should probably qualify what that means - it means 2 seconds or faster, being able to use it in real time, however they need it. I tend to see that as an essential skill if you want to ever learn to apply theoretical ideas to your playing.

For example, if you just learned a G minor triad was G Bb D, and you know the stings of the guitar in real time, you can find that triad in about 3 seconds now, everywhere - all 6 strings starting on any of them, or two handed tapping them, adding a min 7th (F), skies the limit, as to what you do with that information. That's what I mean by applying knowledge to the neck.

Is it photographic memory? I don't think so, at least not in my case. For me it's been in discovering understanding how the brain optimally learns retains and can recall a piece of information, using the shortest path. In simple terms, meaning less work and in a shorter amount of time, and then bringing those observations to bear in what I do.

There are a lot of ways though, that people go about learning the neck. Most of them take a lot of time and practice (which most of it is boring, in my opinion) to where they can do it quickly. Best estimates I've seen, range from several weeks to months.

Many learn by years of immersion. After a while, if you play the guitar long enough or study or learn to sightread, you get it by virtue of doing it. In the years I've been teaching, and the thousand plus students I've helped, I don't know of a single person that learned it via photographic memory. I'd suspect that the number of instances where that comes into play are rare.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 2, 2015,
#9
Quote by wiggedy
How long did it take you?

I am again to learn the fret board again... This time I am using an approach used by one of the online courses. Basically learning the A minor pentatonic up and down each string and by position by Name and Degree. Then fleshing that out by adding extra intervals that work with the minor Pentatonic, basically the Composite Blues Scale.

Do people like Joe Bonamassa, Eric Johnson have like a photographic memory? Is that what set these players apart from us mere mortals?

Learning names and positions is all well and good, but the most important part of the puzzle is learning the sounds and I'm conscious that you didn't mention that.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Learning names and positions is all well and good, but the most important part of the puzzle is learning the sounds and I'm conscious that you didn't mention that.


I agree that is the ultimate goal
#11
Quote by jerrykramskoy
If you want to speed this up, realise that you are learning interval shapes. Not sure I agree with doing this one string at a time as above .. since most shapes involve two strings (not necessarily adjacent), and you will recognise these everywhere, visually (in scales and chords). Everyone I've taught has learned these shapes within a week, only spending a few minutes a day ... they are that simple.

This may help you: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html

Good luck, Jerry



Thanks for the link
#12
Quote by deluxity
This

If you are improvising or composing, it doesn't make sense to know where F or Ab is if you don't really know the sound of the intervals.

Still, if you're reading sheet music, knowing where every note is, is a must.

I used to just sit down and say: Ok, let's find all the G notes in every string. Then i just thought of another random note and did the same thing, over and over again for months. At a certain point i just knew where to find every note. No photographic memory needed


Yeah I think I need to simply spend more time on this, I must admit I have improved since I started this thread... If only slightly...

Thanks all