#1
I plan on playing the guitar next year for our schools jazz band.I asked my band director for music for next year and he gave me a lead sheet that contains a lot of different and weird chords. My question is how should i go about learning all those chords? Is there like a moveable shape for each type of chord such as sus 4, Bb6/9, Ab9, or will i have to look up each chord individual and learn it like that?
#3
Quote by AcousticMirror
you should look them up.
you sure your going to be ready in time?

I should be ready in time. My only problem really is memorizing all the chords.
#4
Do some googling. You can find all kinds of sites with various types of chord charts.

Memorizing the chords is only half of it. You'll also need to be able to use them and change from any one chord to another quick enough to use them in the context of a song. It will take a lot of practice, but once you get the hang of it jazz is a lot of fun.

In some cases there should be a moveable shape, same as standard barre chords, just move it up two frets or whatever. But that will only be when you go from something like a Ab9 to a Bb9. When you go from that to a Em7 or whatever it's a whole nuther ball game...so you'll need to do some practicing with the songs too and get proficient at changing from one chord to another...same as any other style of music.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
instead of learning particular chords, you should learn how chords are constructed and why.


once you understand what everything means and from where it is derived you will be able to see any chord and understand how and why its played.
#6
Quote by rickyj
instead of learning particular chords, you should learn how chords are constructed and why.


once you understand what everything means and from where it is derived you will be able to see any chord and understand how and why its played.




give a man a fish he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for life.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#7
Learn the moveable shapes and lean to walk them up and down the neck. This is a great opportunity for you to go outside your comfort zone and learn some new stuff. Later you can incorporate those voicings in your own music. Learn a few of them near the nut but once you get the moveable shapes you can find a way to play whatever they throw at you.
#8
Quote by rickyj
instead of learning particular chords, you should learn how chords are constructed and why.


once you understand what everything means and from where it is derived you will be able to see any chord and understand how and why its played.


Great advice.
There's also this..
Often a complicated *looking* chord change will mean a one-note change from the previous chord. Learn what notes make up a chord and you'll begin to see what's going on.
#9
Quote by rickyj
instead of learning particular chords, you should learn how chords are constructed and why.


once you understand what everything means and from where it is derived you will be able to see any chord and understand how and why its played.

To do that wont i have to memorize all the major scales and then memorize how each type of chord is constructed? Wont that take longer then just looking the chords up? I can see how in the long run it would help to know how chords are constructed since that way you can just create your own chords. I only have a few months so i dont think i can learn all that in the time span.
#10
Quote by Darkn3ss99
To do that wont i have to memorize all the major scales and then memorize how each type of chord is constructed? Wont that take longer then just looking the chords up? I can see how in the long run it would help to know how chords are constructed since that way you can just create your own chords. I only have a few months so i dont think i can learn all that in the time span.


You're not going to have to memorize a ton of scales.

But if you know that a C chord contains CEG and that a Cm chord contains CEbG, then you'll begin to realize that if you can find the root of any chord, the minor version is going to have that third flatted.

Simply looking up the chords may get you by, but understanding that you just looked up a chord that's exactly the same shape as another chord, but moved into a different position, is a lot more useful.

And when you understand how the chord is constructed, you'll find that you usually don't need the entire chord to suggest it. A power chord is an obvious example, but if you're going to be playing jazz (and particularly with a band), you'll seldom need or want all the notes of a complicated chord. If you know what makes that chord distinctive in a particular circumstance, your playing will be a lot tastier.
#11
Two months is plenty of time although it will require effort on your part. You're going to need to decide if you think it's worth it. In my opinion it is worth it and learning it isn't as hard at it seems. Just gotta start small and work your way up.
And everything that once was
infinitely far
and unsayable is now
unsayable
and right here in the room.


- Franz Wright
Last edited by NougatOfficial at May 2, 2015,
#12
I was involved in my high schools jazz and big band and it was one the best learning experiences I ever had. I was forced to learn chords I had never heard of. Learning and understanding those chords was a real blessing that allowed me to accept gigs that were generally out of my own bands rock styles. I could do pickup jobs and play great gigs for decent money. In later years I was able to play and work with a variety of bands and was often a "go to" at a local studio when someone needed a guitar player. It's going to be a lot of work on your part but you are making a wise decision.
Since you need to learn fast I suggest you get a good chord book and learn the shapes. Yes in the long run it's best that you learn what makes up the chord voicings but this is not something you will learn in a few quick months by trying to learn how the chords are formed from the scales unless you already have much of that scale knowledge under your belt. You need a "quick start" guide that shows you where to put which finger. I suggest you learn the chord shapes (two for each type to start). Good luck. You are making a wise decision to expand you playing ability.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 3, 2015,
#13
Ty all one last question. Should i use a thumb pick and pluck the notes or plectrum to strum?
#14
Chords are everything. They are the vocabulary of music and the guys who know em stand head and shoulders above the guys who don't. I played in both HS and college jazz band and this was a trial by fire for me as my reading skills were pretty limited at 17. Know your chords, get the gig!

This is a pretty good introduction, Robben Ford also has a chord book that opens up your world.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/books-sheet-music-media/emedia-50-chord-tricks-you-must-know-dvd?cntry=us&source=3WWRWXGP&gclid=CN-6scCwscUCFYZffgodvmgAow&kwid=productads-plaid^82172832867-sku^H94392000000000@ADL4MF-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^51870555867
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#15
First, go over to this site:
http://www.jazzguitar.be
Where you will find a number of good resources including a nice article on the basics of jazz chording and rhythm "comping" which is what you'll be doing.

As to how to play....The most common method is with a pick. Check out any number of youtube videos jazz ensembles with rhythm guitarists. It's usually a fairly quick "eight to the bar" technique.
You can comp fingerstyle, playing all the notes of the chord at once. Usually, 4 or 5 note chords instead of "block" chords.
This requires that you master the technique of producing a good sound with your fingers...

Also, you will find that if the instructor gave you a "lead sheet" with the chord changes, that there are going to be a number of different ways to play each chord, and you're going to have to decide which one sounds best.
#16
If you are comping in a jazz band you really only need to use very simple 2 and 3 note comping chords.

The guitarist will clash with the bass and piano if he plays large extended chords.

Check out this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0140OWvZkKY
"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. This is my religion." -- Abraham Lincoln