#1
I wired up my guitar a couple of months ago, and last night, a problem arose. I opened it up and I cant find any issues with it. Here's a basic description of the wiring:
Standard 1v1t wiring with 3 way blade switch (2 humbuckers)
Volume and tone are both push pulls.
Volume wired to coil tap the bridge pickup
tone wired to coil tap the neck pickup
both coil taps are wired in what I call the duncan method (the two coil wires are connected to each other, the to a switch, and that switch toggles between a pin that has nothing connected to it, and a different pin that connects it to ground.

the problem:
The bridge pickup sounds extremely weak compared to the neck pickup in humbucker mode. When I pull the volume knob up to coil tap the bridge pickup, the output returns to normal.

What could the issue possibly be? I don't see any shorts or loose wires
#2
Have you definitely got the right two wires connected?

You could have made the two coils out of phase with each other, which would cancel any overlapping frequencies and give a very thin weak sound which would then not happen when you turn off one of the coils.

Check the pickup manufacturers instructions to make sure the right wires are connected
#3
Quote by xnameisonx
Have you definitely got the right two wires connected?

You could have made the two coils out of phase with each other, which would cancel any overlapping frequencies and give a very thin weak sound which would then not happen when you turn off one of the coils.

Check the pickup manufacturers instructions to make sure the right wires are connected


it was working perfectly fine for a good month or two
#5
Quote by Explorerbuilder
Sounds like hte hot lead has either come unsoldered or broken.

That would mean I just wouldn't get any output at all, right? The output returns to normal if I engage the coil tap
#6
as long as it's not going into parallel for the humbucking mode on the pickup in question. double if not triple check the color code and any wires you're not sure about or whip out a multimeter and get some readings/tests. Measuring the ohms of the pickup or the continuity of the wires are two good things.

one other tip besides looking for cold solders I can think of is raise the pickup height. In experience I was amazed at how many of the 100s of people I worked on their guitars never thought to raise their pickups height.

when in doubt though I remember when was new to wiring I would take everything apart and start over. It's never fun but because of it I have a way better understanding of diagrams where I hardly visit guitarelectronics.com or the SD wiring site which the SD one is fantastic. Just wish they would fix the issues on certain diagrams like the tele and jimmy page ones.
#7
Quote by Tallwood13
as long as it's not going into parallel for the humbucking mode on the pickup in question. double if not triple check the color code and any wires you're not sure about or whip out a multimeter and get some readings/tests. Measuring the ohms of the pickup or the continuity of the wires are two good things.

one other tip besides looking for cold solders I can think of is raise the pickup height. In experience I was amazed at how many of the 100s of people I worked on their guitars never thought to raise their pickups height.

when in doubt though I remember when was new to wiring I would take everything apart and start over. It's never fun but because of it I have a way better understanding of diagrams where I hardly visit guitarelectronics.com or the SD wiring site which the SD one is fantastic. Just wish they would fix the issues on certain diagrams like the tele and jimmy page ones.


Like I said, It's got to be a wiring issue, as the pickup was perfectly fine for several months, it's a dimarzio x2n, which is a damn hot pickup. I just don't understand why it only sounds thin as a humbucker, I would think it's going into parallel, but I know it was perfectly fine for months on end
#9
I suffered with a "weak neck pickup" for years, blaming my amp and cables mostly and never knowing why it would have some "good" days and some "bad" days. I finally opened it up (again) to check the wiring and happened to notice that the rivet that attaches the connection lug on the volume control was loose. This is so easy to miss when inspecting wiring that I never noticed it for (literally) 20 years!

Once I replaced the volume control it came alive like never before, and I am only now rediscovering what a great sounding guitar it is.

Bottom line: Guitar amps have pretty high impedance inputs, and therefore even a very poor connection in the guitar might still work to give a signal but not sound quite right. Try gently jiggling the connections while playing a string through the amp and see if it changes as a result.