#1
People say that my guitar is suck when I'm telling that I get it for 70$ and the other say that is great when I tell them it cost me 450$(I'm actually lying).

They say that it made of cheap headstock...blah blah blah
When I tell them it expensive and record it for them they say that it sound good, but when I tell them that it was a cheap guitar they say that it sound bad....=_=

So, Can you describe me on how good guitar are actually good!!!

Sorry English is not my first language.
#3
People tend to hear things with their eyes, so to speak.

In reality how good a guitar is at fulfilling a certain purpose has nothing to do with what the headstock says. But supposedly the 'higher-end' the guitar is, the greater expectations we have for the guitar to sound good. Its a confirmation bias.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 4, 2015,
#4
I keep thinking about this and compare my guitar to expensive one. but still can't find the answer.

Some guitar are actually sound better than the expensive 1 by just changing the PickUp and some just modded and stuff.

Now, I really don't know what does good guitar actually mean.

They said YOUR ACTION TOO HIGH. Well you can adjust it right?
They said YOUR NECK IS ANGLE!!!. Pffff, That still adjustable with allen key why you call it a bad guitar?

Really confuse right now.
#5
bad workmanship, uneven frets, cheap electronics, bad finish, many things add up. Generally you get what you pay for up to about $1200 or so
#6
Good and Bad in what way?
Materials used can be judged easily enough in some cases, number of piece of wood, grain orientation, quality of wood etc. Hardware, PUs.
Workmanship can be similarily inspected as far as appearances go but underlying assessments (correct placement of components, angles, radius etc) are tougher to judge without more detail inspect, possibly tools or specs to compare against.
Feel or how it plays are totally subjective. There's no right or wrong answer providee the guitar(s) in question can be tuned up and are basically playable.
Moving on.....
#7
It's also worth nothing that in some aspects, it may be bad to some and awesome to others. For example, I prefer thin necks, so obviously a guitar with a fat neck will be bad for me.

But how the guitar feels aside, then what makes a good guitar was already mentioned:
The quality of the materials
Woods used (also a bit subjective though)
The quality of the eletronics
The workmanship
And many many others.

Also, what you mentioned about the action and truss rod... Well, if a guitar is not well crafted, it won't allow low action for example. Say, if your frets are uneven (a sign of bad workmanship), you won't get low action without fret buzz. And uneven frets is a common problem on cheaper guitars. I recently bought a 300 euros guitar and one fret was uneven, causing buzz, but since it was only one fret, the problem was solved easily.

Quote by sosxradar
I keep thinking about this and compare my guitar to expensive one. but still can't find the answer.


If you can't see the differences between a cheap guitar and an expensive guitar, then maybe you are not a very experienced player just yet. You may have your guitar very well set up and all that stuff, and maybe you were lucky and got a very good guitar for 70$, but I am totally sure there must be huge differences when it comes to the quality of the materials, woods and workmanship.
Last edited by DanyFS at May 4, 2015,
#8
My idea is rather that the higher the price, the higher chance there is the guitar is good quality (meaning: reliable electronics and wiring, good fretwork, perfect proportions and measurements etc.). It is totally possible to find very decent guitars for a relatively low price, as well as sometimes poor quality ones for a high price. It depends on the company (mainly their approach to quality control - some have a reputation for decent QC even on cheap models), the series (some are more successful and better designed than others) and sometimes literally on a guitar to guitar basis.

Which is also why it's generally the best idea to always play the guitar with your own hands before buying it, and I'd only consider buying online without touching it earlier above a certain (high) price.
#10
There are so many factors that make separate a good guitar from a bad one but the biggest factor in my opinion is quality of workmanship.

The lowest quality guitar I ever purchased was a Squire Vintage Modified Surf Stratocaster. On the flipside, I have a Squier Classic Vibe Tele Thinline that was better made than the Fender '69 Tele Thinline I compared it to.

Every manufacturer has a price point where there is enough profit in the guitar for quality to a primary concern. Below that rice point, quality is hit or miss.
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#11
I've seen $1500 guitars I wouldn't walk across the street for, and I have a $200 Squier Strat I'll never part with...1st Les Paul I ever picked up I hated it. No sustain, wimpy sounding, plugged it in and not much better. The one right beside it identical but different finish was a killer guitar.

Aside from quality construction I'm not sure what it is. I've seen the same thing lots of times. Two identical guitars, one is great the other is a dud. That goes for everything from el cheapo Teisco and Harmony guitars to Fenders and Gibsons.

A good guitar is one that sounds and plays good unplugged, feels good in your hands. Forget price and name tag. My Squier is one of the best Starts I've ever played, I play it more than the Cort CL 1500 that cost 4 times as much new. The Cort is a very nice guitar, hollow body made from thicker wood than any other hollow body I've ever seen, great neck, gorgeous finish, inlays all up the neck, good quality tuners...and I play the cheapo Squier most of the might when I'm onstage, play the Cort on about 4 songs. The Squier wouldn't be considered a "better" guitar, but it plays great and sounds terrific, while the Cort is just another good guitar...can't explain that one...You can find Squiers new for under $300 all day, the Cort was around $900 - $1000 new. My Squier was about $200 new. Yeah that was a while back, I've played it since 1998.

Bottom line, forget price and name tag, a good guitar is one that plays and sounds good.

Another example...I had a Epiphone acoustic years ago, stolen in Austin in the late 80's. We had parties pretty regular where the guys would bring their guitars. 1957 Fender, new Sigma electric/acoustic, nice Alvarez acoustic and my cheap Epiphone. All the others were at least $600 guitars, I paid $100 for mine used. It was always the first one everybody would pick up, I never got to play my own guitar...I didn't mind, I liked all the others pretty well, and I had set them up for the guys so they all played good. But that little Epi was the one everybody always picked up when they went into the guitar room...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#13
Quote by DanyFS
If you can't see the differences between a cheap guitar and an expensive guitar, then maybe you are not a very experienced player just yet.


This.

Quote by Vampire_State
Do you like the guitar? Yes? Then it's a good guitar.


And this.

I'd argue that starting out on a modest instrument is a good thing. Years from now, if you continue to play and improve, you'll have a better appreciation for quality of craftsmanship, quality of materials, playability, consistency, and superior tone.

It's like a new driver getting a BMW M3 for as their first ever car. They might recognize that it's an excellent car in all respects but they'll have no frame of reference as to why it's superior.

Don't let a price tag or other people's opinions affect your opinion of something. Always criticize with an un-biased perception, and come to your own conclusion.
#14
Quote by X-plorer88
This.


And this.

I'd argue that starting out on a modest instrument is a good thing. Years from now, if you continue to play and improve, you'll have a better appreciation for quality of craftsmanship, quality of materials, playability, consistency, and superior tone.

It's like a new driver getting a BMW M3 for as their first ever car. They might recognize that it's an excellent car in all respects but they'll have no frame of reference as to why it's superior.

Don't let a price tag or other people's opinions affect your opinion of something. Always criticize with an un-biased perception, and come to your own conclusion.




if you like it, it is good.

people think $$$ = quality, but thats not always the case.

here is a short example. when i had only played for a year or two, i thought my cheap guitars were awesome. i had four or five $300 guitars, two fenders, two washburns and an EC400. i sold an amp to a family friend. i got there and saw a les paul custom on the wall and a custom shop heavy relic strat. i was offered to play them, and as you may imagine, i realized that my guitars were only a fraction of what i thought they were. 10 years later, i have a lot of decent guitars, and appreciate them, but if i would have started on a LP custom or CS fender, i wouldn't have the appreciation.
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#15
Things that objectively make a guitar bad:
REALLY BAD
-Warped neck
-Misaligned neck/bridge (strings off-center, or individual saddles pulling left/right)
-Non-functioning truss rod
BAD BUT FIXABLE (with enough skill or money)
-Unlevel frets
-poorly cut nut
-poor pick ups (super microphonic, noisy, etc)
-poor quality switches & pots
NORMAL CRAP (even on american made guitars)
-action too high low
-neck relief needs adjustment
-general set up issues

If a guitar doesn't have any of the stuff in the first two sections I'd call it good. If it's got just a couple things in the fixable category I'd call it okay. The money spent helps get a good guitar but doesn't guarantee anything.
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#16
Quote by sosxradar
People say that my guitar is suck when I'm telling that I get it for 70$ and the other say that is great when I tell them it cost me 450$(I'm actually lying).

They say that it made of cheap headstock...blah blah blah
When I tell them it expensive and record it for them they say that it sound good, but when I tell them that it was a cheap guitar they say that it sound bad....=_=

So, Can you describe me on how good guitar are actually good!!!

Sorry English is not my first language.


Simple question with a simple answer:

1) stays in tune
2) has good intonation
3) has no dead spots or obvious defects etc.

Any guitar that meets the above criteria is a good guitar regardless of price. A great guitar has all of those attributes and also sounds great.
#17
Check out how often Jimmy Page played his Dan Armstrong/Danelectro guitar on classic Led Zep recordings and even in concert. The guitar is made of cheap fiber board/pressed plywood and you could buy them in the 60's for $67.95 in a case with a built in amplifier from the Sears catalog (it was my first guitar). I wish I still owned it. If you are a great player you can make things sound great. I think there is too much emphasis on how much things cost rather than how they sound and actually play.

I think TheLiberation post above is right. You can insure a better chance of more consistent quality by buying higher priced big name guitars but that's not always 100% either. If the guitar feels good and sounds good and you like playing it, that's what it's all about whether it is a $200 Agile 2000 or a $5000.00 Gibson Custom Shop guitar.

(I only bring up the Agile 2000 because I just ordered one yesterday. The name comes up so often here on the forum I just have to find out myself.)
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 5, 2015,
#18
I have experiences through the years with budget guitars and played the hell out of them. What I learned is replacing parts or upgrading to make it better but at the end no longevity. Parts on the budget guitars do not last.

I didn't know this until I got a couple of custom made guitars but then I found that the budget guitars were dull sounding. I had nothing to compare to then. My custom guitars changed all that and I won't look back. True there were some gems in the rough and you're blessed if you got one.

I met a guy on Buck Dharma forum who makes Harper guitars (J.C. Harper) and he offered me a no frill Buck Dharma model. I got him to make me one and all handmade at that. One piece Mahogany, one piece Maple neck, intonations is perfect and great action. It became my keeper forever though I don't play it much as my Carvin DC127 is what I use.

I just love that guitar. I reworked it by Cherrywood stained it and put pickup rings on it with the Carvin Holdsworth pups. It weights a little over 6 lbs.

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Last edited by OldRocker at May 5, 2015,
#19
Hi Guys
I bought this strat copy late 70s early 80s, for around $35.00 new.
Its a Magnum and most people in Australia will give the brand a really bad wrap.
Its plays great action is really light sounds sharp, the only thing I have replaced is strings.
I guess what I am trying to say its not the money its the guitar. Before you go and buy one play it first.
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#20
Quote by sosxradar
People say that my guitar is suck when I'm telling that I get it for 70$ and the other say that is great when I tell them it cost me 450$(I'm actually lying).

They say that it made of cheap headstock...blah blah blah
When I tell them it expensive and record it for them they say that it sound good, but when I tell them that it was a cheap guitar they say that it sound bad....=_=

So, Can you describe me on how good guitar are actually good!!!

Sorry English is not my first language.


It is somewhat subjective and means different things to different people. Guitars are just tools for making music and some will be better for making your music than others. If it works for you, it is good.

My choices:
I play live a lot so I need a guitar that plays well, produces "my sound", stays in tune, has quality hardware and electronics that won't fail in the middle of a gig. I don't need or want a very expensive guitar that I have to worry about getting stolen or damaged. Save the high end signature models for someone else. I don't need new and actually prefer a guitar that has been played and has some patina. Different folks will have different needs.
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#21
Quote by Cajundaddy
It is somewhat subjective and means different things to different people. Guitars are just tools for making music and some will be better for making your music than others. If it works for you, it is good.

My choices:
I play live a lot so I need a guitar that plays well, produces "my sound", stays in tune, has quality hardware and electronics that won't fail in the middle of a gig. I don't need or want a very expensive guitar that I have to worry about getting stolen or damaged. Save the high end signature models for someone else. I don't need new and actually prefer a guitar that has been played and has some patina. Different folks will have different needs.


your first statement sums it up pretty good. good is very subjective (and great even more so). totally agree that any guitar that offers me "my sound" and also plays well for "me" is a good guitar. price can be an indicator of potential quality but that's about it. one of my fav guitars is a Vintage SG copy i paid $150 used. it plays really well and even stock sounds really good. when i get a chance i'll upgrade the pickups and it will sound even better. is it as "good" as an actual 61 LP/SG, well on paper not even close but in reality its way better than the price wopuld suggest.
#22
Both Monowobbo and Cajundaddy are 100% correct IMHO. I own and have owned some fairly expensive high end guitars in my many years of playing but they are not the ones that go to gigs and do the real work. Over the past ten years I have traded or sold a few of the ones that over the years never left my house and other people wanted more than I did. It gave me the cash to invest in other things like buying a better computer better recording and PA equipment, and since I also play some keyboards I bought a beautiful Yamaha Digital Piano that I wanted. My guitars are not museum pieces or trophies hanging on the wall to impress my friends so it was nice owning them but I don't really miss them much. I still have too many guitars and all they need to do is feel good, sound good and please me visually.

I'm not criticizing anyone who owns beautiful high priced guitars. I'm sure they are excellent playing instruments and sound awesome. If you love them and think it's worth it to you to own them, you should have them. If you find a $150.00 slightly dented guitar that also plays well and "speaks to you", that's a good guitar whatever it's value to others.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 12, 2015,
#23
Quote by Rickholly74
Both Monowobbo and Cajundaddy are 100% correct IMHO. I own and have owned some fairly expensive high end guitars in my many years of playing but they are not the ones that go to gigs and do the real work. Over the past ten years I have traded or sold a few of the ones that over the years never left my house and other people wanted more than I did. It gave me the cash to invest in other things like buying a better computer better recording and PA equipment, and since I also play some keyboards I bought a beautiful Yamaha Digital Piano that I wanted. My guitars are not museum pieces or trophies hanging on the wall to impress my friends so it was nice owning them but I don't really miss them much. I still have too many guitars and all they need to do is feel good, sound good and please me visually.

I'm not criticizing anyone who owns beautiful high priced guitars. I'm sure they are excellent playing instruments and sound awesome. If you love them and think it's worth it to you to own them, you should have them. If you find a $150.00 slightly dented guitar that also plays well and "speaks to you", that's a good guitar whatever it's value to others.


seems to me that the key to knowing "what is a good guitar" is experience. having a good frame of reference is very helpful. knowing what works for you is the other. after all these years of playing i can pretty much say yay or nay to any guitar i pick up after about 5 minutes. if the neck doesn't work for me then no matter how "good" the rest of the guitar is it's a no go for me. little things like pickups will never be a deal breaker as they can be replaced easily.

i've been lucky as i've been able to play a wide variety of guitars over the years (we have several guitar shops here). i've played a real 59 Les Paul, a couple of early 60s SG style LPs and several 50s & early 60s strats (amoungst others). i've owned US made guitars from BC Rich, Kramer and Hamer along with the usual Gibson and Fender. even with all that some of my favs over the years have been cheapies that just happended to be "good".