#1
Everyone I seem to come across is strict about having only the thumb touching neck but when I play my open chords (some of them) like c and d i have my palm touching the neck as I find it comfy an have big hands. I use the to mute top strings like on a D chord. But I shift with thumb behind only for barre chords and lead licks. Does it really matter as it hasn't affected me on playing in the 2+ years that I have.
#2
f it works for you then it's good. can't say i'm strict about much of anything i position my hand in whatever manor suites what i'm playing and makes it easier to transition to the next part of the song.
#3
i'm not strict at all
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by BassBen93
Everyone I seem to come across is strict about having only the thumb touching neck but when I play my open chords (some of them) like c and d i have my palm touching the neck as I find it comfy an have big hands. I use the to mute top strings like on a D chord. But I shift with thumb behind only for barre chords and lead licks. Does it really matter as it hasn't affected me on playing in the 2+ years that I have.

The really important thing is that you know when to use which and why they are useful for the things they are used for. Personally I am pretty strict based on that, knowing when to use the classical position can be very important for playing well and maintaining your hands and arms if you're playing strenuous material.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Depends on what chords I'm transitioning from and transitioning too. Sometimes it's easier to keep the thumb on the back of the neck rather than wrapping it round. Wrapping it round is the most comfortable position for the C and F chord though (at least for me) but it does feel somewhat crowded doing it that way.
#6
I use 2 stances. The behind the neck for barre chords, is the most powerful and most versatile, and the one I use the most. The other one lets you wrap the thumb around.

I have fingerings for most chords rooted on the E string for both stances.

I also use both for soloing. The wrap stance is more for bluesy pentatonic styles, and the other for everything else including fast runs.

"if it works for you then it works." Is a potentially dangerous philosophy, because, sure, it might work fine for you now, but after playing a while you might want to play faster, and play things that require a specific technique. So then you have to change everything and get used to what you didn't like anyway.

It also might never come up for you. But juyst saying "do what's comfortable for you" is not a good philosophy if you intend on becoming very good at guitar. If you just want to play around for fun, then it's not quite so important.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at May 4, 2015,
#7
^ It's a judgement call. There are potentially dangerous things about "do it right" as well.

Quote by gweddle.nz
Depends on what chords I'm transitioning from and transitioning too. Sometimes it's easier to keep the thumb on the back of the neck rather than wrapping it round. Wrapping it round is the most comfortable position for the C and F chord though (at least for me) but it does feel somewhat crowded doing it that way.


Yeah. I was looking at this last night and there are certain chords I genuinely can't play with my thumb on the back of the neck. On the other hand, there are others (power and barre, maybe others) where my thumb automatically goes to the back of the neck.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 5, 2015,
#8
Quote by fingrpikingood
I use 2 stances. The behind the neck for barre chords, is the most powerful and most versatile, and the one I use the most. The other one lets you wrap the thumb around.

I have fingerings for most chords rooted on the E string for both stances.

I also use both for soloing. The wrap stance is more for bluesy pentatonic styles, and the other for everything else including fast runs.

"if it works for you then it works." Is a potentially dangerous philosophy, because, sure, it might work fine for you now, but after playing a while you might want to play faster, and play things that require a specific technique. So then you have to change everything and get used to what you didn't like anyway.

It also might never come up for you. But juyst saying "do what's comfortable for you" is not a good philosophy if you intend on becoming very good at guitar. If you just want to play around for fun, then it's not quite so important.


well can't agree. the world if full of guys that play the way that works for them. there is no definitive way to really do anything on a guitar. you're gonna find someone that successfully does some other way. technique is an evolving thing so you really should get used to the idea that no one way fits everything. if you can't adjust then you may not become a good guitar player. innovation often comes from someone doing something the "wrong" way. best example i can give is Jeff Healey. he laid the guitar on his lap and played it upsidedown (and he was blind). by all accounts that would be the "wrong" way to do it and yet he was very successful.
#9
+1

Also technique (for me, anyway) is a means to an end, it's not the end in itself.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
I am generally of the opinion that "do what works for you" only holds any water if there is already something in place that works. It's all very well and good saying that so many people have managed to become great players by doing whatever unusual thing, but I do not honestly believe that any one of us would say to a brand new player who had no idea what they were doing that they should start that way, which is really what it comes down to in my opinion. I reckon, correct me if I'm wrong of course, that if someone came to us and said "I cannot play guitar at all. Please tell me what to do." we would advocate for conventional ways of playing, and this doesn't suddenly become useless once we're talking about what to do to achieve high level playing.

I would also argue that for some reason electric guitar is the only instrument to have this way of thinking and reasoning about it. If you go to a teacher for any more established instrument they will tell you exactly what to do and how to play. They won't tell you what notes to play to get your sound out (at least not if they're any good, but they will definitely show and tell you exactly how your body should be positioned to achieve your aims.

And also for the record, there are most definitely more efficient ways of doing most things, ways that place the least strain on your body for any given thing to play. Some of them only matter once you're doing things that are very difficult or fast or things you need to repeat for minutes at a time, but they do exist. Most players will probably never need these things, but it's easier to assume that everyone will eventually need to play super efficiently than to say "do whatever" and then have someone come back later who needs to correct their technique to play something they never anticipated when they started.

Technique is absolutely the means to an end, you'll not find me saying otherwise (at least not any more )... but there's no reason not to get it as right as possible. Yeah sure if you just want to play blues licks over a 12-bar or play singer-songwriter barre chord type material it doesn't matter... but then when was the last time you saw someone like that ask about technique to begin with?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
(a) I am generally of the opinion that "do what works for you" only holds any water if there is already something in place that works. It's all very well and good saying that so many people have managed to become great players by doing whatever unusual thing, but I do not honestly believe that any one of us would say to a brand new player who had no idea what they were doing that they should start that way, which is really what it comes down to in my opinion. I reckon, correct me if I'm wrong of course, that if someone came to us and said "I cannot play guitar at all. Please tell me what to do." we would advocate for conventional ways of playing, (b) and this doesn't suddenly become useless once we're talking about what to do to achieve high level playing.

(c) I would also argue that for some reason electric guitar is the only instrument to have this way of thinking and reasoning about it. If you go to a teacher for any more established instrument they will tell you exactly what to do and how to play. They won't tell you what notes to play to get your sound out (at least not if they're any good, but they will definitely show and tell you exactly how your body should be positioned to achieve your aims.

(d) And also for the record, there are most definitely more efficient ways of doing most things, ways that place the least strain on your body for any given thing to play. Some of them only matter once you're doing things that are very difficult or fast or things you need to repeat for minutes at a time, but they do exist. Most players will probably never need these things, but it's easier to assume that everyone will eventually need to play super efficiently than to say "do whatever" and then have someone come back later who needs to correct their technique to play something they never anticipated when they started.

(e) Technique is absolutely the means to an end, you'll not find me saying otherwise (at least not any more )... but there's no reason not to get it as right as possible. Yeah sure if you just want to play blues licks over a 12-bar or play singer-songwriter barre chord type material it doesn't matter... but then when was the last time you saw someone like that ask about technique to begin with?


(a) Agreed. It's like in the gear forums when a new (or newish) player is asking what gear to use to get a certain tone, and you always get a few (smart-alecky IMO, and normally not from regulars either) responses along the line of, "You can use any guitar for any type of music"- not terribly helpful, in my opinion.

(b) There is a difference there, though, I think. If someone is looking at difficult styles of playing, there's a fair chance he/she has been playing for ages, and may have to unlearn "bad" habits. In those instances, assuming said player already has something in place which works, it could very well do harm.

Analogy being in the gear forums if an experienced player with thousands of pounds of gear comes in looking for help, we'd likely take a different approach to advising what to buy compared to a newer player with the same budget who's starting from scratch. Maybe the experienced player likes pedal distortion because it just works for him/her, for example, when we prefer amp distortion for those types of tones. We'd work with the experienced player in that instance, whereas with a newer player with no kit we'd suggest getting an amp which is built for distortion.

(c) Agreed, to a certain extent, but at the same time that doesn't always mean it's the best way, either. For example, my sister had a violin teacher who didn't let the class use a bow for years. You won't hear me advocating that style of teaching, for example.

(d) Agreed, but at the same time everyone is different. Just because it's more efficient for the average student doesn't necessarily mean it's more efficient for you as the individual.

(e) There's a pretty good reason if you're struggling with it and it's holding you back.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I am generally of the opinion that "do what works for you" only holds any water if there is already something in place that works. It's all very well and good saying that so many people have managed to become great players by doing whatever unusual thing, but I do not honestly believe that any one of us would say to a brand new player who had no idea what they were doing that they should start that way, which is really what it comes down to in my opinion. I reckon, correct me if I'm wrong of course, that if someone came to us and said "I cannot play guitar at all. Please tell me what to do." we would advocate for conventional ways of playing, and this doesn't suddenly become useless once we're talking about what to do to achieve high level playing.

I would also argue that for some reason electric guitar is the only instrument to have this way of thinking and reasoning about it. If you go to a teacher for any more established instrument they will tell you exactly what to do and how to play. They won't tell you what notes to play to get your sound out (at least not if they're any good, but they will definitely show and tell you exactly how your body should be positioned to achieve your aims.

And also for the record, there are most definitely more efficient ways of doing most things, ways that place the least strain on your body for any given thing to play. Some of them only matter once you're doing things that are very difficult or fast or things you need to repeat for minutes at a time, but they do exist. Most players will probably never need these things, but it's easier to assume that everyone will eventually need to play super efficiently than to say "do whatever" and then have someone come back later who needs to correct their technique to play something they never anticipated when they started.

Technique is absolutely the means to an end, you'll not find me saying otherwise (at least not any more )... but there's no reason not to get it as right as possible. Yeah sure if you just want to play blues licks over a 12-bar or play singer-songwriter barre chord type material it doesn't matter... but then when was the last time you saw someone like that ask about technique to begin with?


ok don't want to give the impression that i advocate doing many things just any old way. i don't. and certainly when teaching i do try to show the "accepted" way. having said that the "best" way is ony that til someone comes up with something better. that won't happen if you don't experiment. there are pros and cons to any techniques. the other thing is that some techniques are used often despite being labeled"wrong". the thumb over the neck thing is a prime example. no jazz guitar teacher would tell you to do that back in the day. even now it's considered a "lazy" rock thing in some quarters.

technique certainly does come into play when doing a "blues" solo over a 12 bar progression. that sepreates the great from the merely ok even if the great ones don't know what the technique is called.
#13
^ that too, good point. the fosbury flop springs to mind.

also a good point about the thumb around the neck thing. i get tired of people (normally who have shitty vibrato and a fairly dubious amount of control over their bends) who keep claiming that that's bad technique for lead guitar.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ that too, good point. the fosbury flop springs to mind.

also a good point about the thumb around the neck thing. i get tired of people (normally who have shitty vibrato and a fairly dubious amount of control over their bends) who keep claiming that that's bad technique for lead guitar.


years ago a friend told me that Rock guitar players were the laziest bunch around so always look for the simplest way to do things and chances are that's what they did for much of the classic rock stuff he's right.

keep in mind that much of the "accepted" way to play guitar comes from way before rock or even jazz were even though of. if you take classical guitar then yeah you'll get beaten for doing the thumb thing.

just goes to show you that blues style playing isn't as easy as it seems and utilizes different techniques. good bends and decent vibrato aren't as simple as some would like to think. i worked hard on both as i found them to be some of my strong points over playing super fast.
#15
Quote by monwobobbo
well can't agree. the world if full of guys that play the way that works for them. there is no definitive way to really do anything on a guitar. you're gonna find someone that successfully does some other way. technique is an evolving thing so you really should get used to the idea that no one way fits everything. if you can't adjust then you may not become a good guitar player. innovation often comes from someone doing something the "wrong" way. best example i can give is Jeff Healey. he laid the guitar on his lap and played it upsidedown (and he was blind). by all accounts that would be the "wrong" way to do it and yet he was very successful.


You've done this before. I am very careful with my wording. I use words like "may" and "might" for a reason. I didn't say "don't do what works for you, because for sure you'll get screwed in the future."

I said, be careful, because sometimes what is best for you now, and comfortable for you now, is not the best strategy, because working on what is difficult will eventually make it easy and comfortable, and sometimes that's something you're going to need to do anyway if you want to get to a certain level.

Obviously, many people have different techniques that work for them. I know I do. But I also know that i've had to change a lot of things, and I've learned a number of things about technique in both guitar and piano, that I only realized I ever had to change once I got advanced enough, to notice their limitations.


It's not about a "right way" or a "wrong way" It's about "method x let's you do ABC, whereas method y lets you do A"

So, it is careful. One shouldn't just do whatever because it is easier for them now. If you want what's easy, then you won't get far in guitar. Guitar is tough. Obviously you want to make it as easy as possible, but sometimes what is mechanically easiest, requires a lot of work in dexterity.

You can also play beautiful music real slow. But if you get good enough, you will start to notice why "proper technique" ever became a thing in the first place.

If you want to really develop your physical ability on the guitar as much as possible, be as physically skilled as possible, you will be better off trying to figure out the best technique right away, and start practicing it at the beginning. I would have much preferred that. But it took me a while to get good enough to care, also.


Quote by fingrpikingood
I use 2 stances. The behind the neck for barre chords, is the most powerful and most versatile, and the one I use the most. The other one lets you wrap the thumb around.

I have fingerings for most chords rooted on the E string for both stances.

I also use both for soloing. The wrap stance is more for bluesy pentatonic styles, and the other for everything else including fast runs.

"if it works for you then it works." Is a potentially dangerous philosophy, because, sure, it might work fine for you now, but after playing a while you might want to play faster, and play things that require a specific technique. So then you have to change everything and get used to what you didn't like anyway.

It also might never come up for you. But juyst saying "do what's comfortable for you" is not a good philosophy if you intend on becoming very good at guitar. If you just want to play around for fun, then it's not quite so important.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at May 5, 2015,
#16
Quote by fingrpikingood
You've done this before. I am very careful with my wording. I use words like "may" and "might" for a reason. I didn't say "don't do what works for you, because for sure you'll get screwed in the future."

I said, be careful, because sometimes what is best for you now, and comfortable for you now, is not the best strategy, because working on what is difficult will eventually make it easy and comfortable, and sometimes that's something you're going to need to do anyway if you want to get to a certain level.

Obviously, many people have different techniques that work for them. I know I do. But I also know that i've had to change a lot of things, and I've learned a number of things about technique in both guitar and piano, that I only realized I ever had to change once I got advanced enough, to notice their limitations.


It's not about a "right way" or a "wrong way" It's about "method x let's you do ABC, whereas method y lets you do A"

So, it is careful. One shouldn't just do whatever because it is easier for them now. If you want what's easy, then you won't get far in guitar. Guitar is tough. Obviously you want to make it as easy as possible, but sometimes what is mechanically easiest, requires a lot of work in dexterity.

You can also play beautiful music real slow. But if you get good enough, you will start to notice why "proper technique" ever became a thing in the first place.

If you want to really develop your physical ability on the guitar as much as possible, be as physically skilled as possible, you will be better off trying to figure out the best technique right away, and start practicing it at the beginning. I would have much preferred that. But it took me a while to get good enough to care, also.


ummm.. this is a discussion board right? just because you use qualifier terms doesn't mean there is no discussion. i understand what you are saying and i hope you understand what i'm getting at. i'm not saying to be lazy but sometimes you have to make adjustments that may not work for others or be considered the "best" way to do it. results count any way you look at it.
#17
Quote by monwobobbo
ummm.. this is a discussion board right? just because you use qualifier terms doesn't mean there is no discussion. i understand what you are saying and i hope you understand what i'm getting at. i'm not saying to be lazy but sometimes you have to make adjustments that may not work for others or be considered the "best" way to do it. results count any way you look at it.


Ya, I get it, but you started by saying "I don't agree with this." And then you said "because sometimes people use unique techniques that work for them."

Which has nothing to do with what I said, because since I said. "may" and not "will" I was already acknowledging that fact.

So, you still haven't disagreed with me yet, like in that other thread that got closed. I'm fine with discussion. I'm just saying, that's twice you are quick to disagree with me, whereas if you read carefully, you would see that the part you disagree with, is not something I said.

It's not a big deal, I'm just saying.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at May 5, 2015,
#18
Quote by monwobobbo
(a) years ago a friend told me that Rock guitar players were the laziest bunch around so always look for the simplest way to do things and chances are that's what they did for much of the classic rock stuff he's right.

(b) keep in mind that much of the "accepted" way to play guitar comes from way before rock or even jazz were even though of. if you take classical guitar then yeah you'll get beaten for doing the thumb thing.

(c) just goes to show you that blues style playing isn't as easy as it seems and utilizes different techniques. good bends and decent vibrato aren't as simple as some would like to think. i worked hard on both as i found them to be some of my strong points over playing super fast.


(a) yeah probably I'm certainly pretty lazy. That being said, a lot of the greats have the sense to not make things hard on themselves, too. Which I'm not sure is exactly the same thing.

(b) Agreed. And, as you implied, before electric guitars came about. Much like the fosbury flop thing- the technology and kit changed, which changed the technique.

(c) Agreed. Same here- I can play fairly quickly (but not the really hardcore shred stuff) but my strength (if I have one ) is probably more feel than chops (I think ). As I said above, a lot of the people who get really pedantic about proper technique in one way completely ignore it in another (bends and vibrato).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#19
On a scale from 1 to 10, I think I am 8 strict with my left hand grip.

Sometimes I have full contact of my hand around the neck, but I consider it a bad habit of myself and always try to not do it.

Why?

Because it limits your movements. Of course that if you only play power or comfortable chords it may be OK to have your hand around the neck, because you don't need a certain level of speed or dexterity. But you play faster lines/scales, more spread chords, or if you use a lot of vibrato and bending, the classical position with the thumb behind the neck can help you a lot. The classical position allows the players to have a greater reach of their fingers, and also wrist rotation used in some of the mentioned techniques. Also, it is my experience that it makes my playing more precise.
#20
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) yeah probably I'm certainly pretty lazy. That being said, a lot of the greats have the sense to not make things hard on themselves, too. Which I'm not sure is exactly the same thing.

(b) Agreed. And, as you implied, before electric guitars came about. Much like the fosbury flop thing- the technology and kit changed, which changed the technique.

(c) Agreed. Same here- I can play fairly quickly (but not the really hardcore shred stuff) but my strength (if I have one ) is probably more feel than chops (I think ). As I said above, a lot of the people who get really pedantic about proper technique in one way completely ignore it in another (bends and vibrato).


well there is a fine line between lazy and not making it hard on yourself sometimes but yeah i know what you are saying. according to the mrs anything i do is the lazy way so i dunno

what the hell is a fosbury flop?

but dude when you are a shred demon who needs bends and vibrato that's what a whammy bar is for (insert dive bomb here)
#21
Quote by monwobobbo
what the hell is a fosbury flop?

I might be wrong but I'm pretty sure it's the name for the way modern high jump is done, way back it wasn't the done thing to arch over the height like they do these days until someone did it and figured out that you can get much higher jumps that way.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#22
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I am generally of the opinion that "do what works for you" only holds any water if there is already something in place that works. It's all very well and good saying that so many people have managed to become great players by doing whatever unusual thing, but I do not honestly believe that any one of us would say to a brand new player who had no idea what they were doing that they should start that way, which is really what it comes down to in my opinion. I reckon, correct me if I'm wrong of course, that if someone came to us and said "I cannot play guitar at all. Please tell me what to do." we would advocate for conventional ways of playing, and this doesn't suddenly become useless once we're talking about what to do to achieve high level playing.

I would also argue that for some reason electric guitar is the only instrument to have this way of thinking and reasoning about it. If you go to a teacher for any more established instrument they will tell you exactly what to do and how to play. They won't tell you what notes to play to get your sound out (at least not if they're any good, but they will definitely show and tell you exactly how your body should be positioned to achieve your aims.

And also for the record, there are most definitely more efficient ways of doing most things, ways that place the least strain on your body for any given thing to play. Some of them only matter once you're doing things that are very difficult or fast or things you need to repeat for minutes at a time, but they do exist. Most players will probably never need these things, but it's easier to assume that everyone will eventually need to play super efficiently than to say "do whatever" and then have someone come back later who needs to correct their technique to play something they never anticipated when they started.

Technique is absolutely the means to an end, you'll not find me saying otherwise (at least not any more )... but there's no reason not to get it as right as possible. Yeah sure if you just want to play blues licks over a 12-bar or play singer-songwriter barre chord type material it doesn't matter... but then when was the last time you saw someone like that ask about technique to begin with?



Right exactly. Technique is not just for show. I started both on piano and also guitar, just doing whatever was easiest, and I got a burned a few times like that, having to learn to play differently because I discovered something else new I wanted to do, or discovered the speed limitations or otherwise of some technique I was using, and had to practice a whole new different technique.

That happened to me quite a lot of times. If I was showing someone how to play acoustic guitar today, I would be in a position to show them all of those things I learned right at the beginning. That way, they wouldn't have to change how they played every time they wanted to take their playing to the next level.

I could have saved a lot of time if I could have had the foreknowledge of what would eventually matter to me.

But there are also all sorts of guitarists with all sorts of goals. Some people just want to strum at the campfire, do some pentatonic licks here or there, and learn a few songs they like. For those people it might make less sense to spend more time learning a more difficult technique, because they will never get to the level where it matters.

Techniques are techniques for a reason. Someone figured out they were the best most efficient for something. So, if you want to become the best you can become at a given style, you probably want to learn the techniques associated with that style. There are a lot of different styles, and a lot of different techniques. Technique can refer to any style, not just classical, classical technique is not "proper" technique. It's technique suited to playing classical guitar.
#23
Quote by monwobobbo
well there is a fine line between lazy and not making it hard on yourself sometimes but yeah i know what you are saying. according to the mrs anything i do is the lazy way so i dunno

what the hell is a fosbury flop?

but dude when you are a shred demon who needs bends and vibrato that's what a whammy bar is for (insert dive bomb here)


yeah definitely, a lot of these things are fine lines.

zaphod got the fosbury flop definition. quite analogous to guitar as well because (according to wikipedia, I have no interest in athletics ) apparently they didn't used to use a soft mat, so the newer and better technique went hand in hand with newer and better kit which allowed that newer technique to be used without completely pwning yourself.

Also analogous because a lot of people say that classical technique has been around for well over 100 years while electric technique has only been around for maybe 50 or 60. But the fosbury flop was only developed in the mid 1960s.

Quote by fingrpikingood
Technique can refer to any style, not just classical, classical technique is not "proper" technique. It's technique suited to playing classical guitar.


Excellent point, agreed. Classical players wouldn't let rock or blues players tell them their technique is incorrect; why should rock or blues players let classical players tell them their technique is incorrect?
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 7, 2015,