Page 1 of 5
#1
To-may-doe, to-ma-doe. Discuss regional accents.

Possible topics of discussion:
  • What accents interest you?
  • What accents are peculiar to you?
  • Describe your accent and how it has changed in your lifetime.
  • Does your accent match where you live?
  • If you speak more than one language, do you have trouble adapting accents with other languages?
  • Do your parents/people who raised you have the same accent as you do?
  • What accents can you emulate well?
  • Do certain accents make you more attracted to an individual?

P.S. - There is no place for ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, or classism in this thread.

Here are my answers to those questions:
  • What accents interest you?
    United States - Southern
    United States - "Jewish"
    United States - Boston
    Jamaica - Patois
    UK - RP
    UK - Glasgow, Scotland
    UK - Northern Ireland
    UK - Manchester, England
    Spain - Castillian
    South America - Peru
    French - Metropolitan French
    Canada - Quebec French
    Australia - general
    Australia - Adelaide

  • What accents are peculiar to you?
    UK - East England
    UK - Yorkshire, England
    United States - Brooklyn
    United States - California
    United States - Wisconsin
    Filipino - all permutations
    New Zealand - "Kiwi"

  • Describe your accent and how it has changed in your lifetime.
    I was born in Manila, Philippines, so my accent was what Filipinos would consider standard- think RP in England or Mid-Atlantic in America. It changed as I developed a more mid-Atlantic accent when I was seven and moved to northern New Jersey - with a lot of Italian-American influence. Because the people with whom I spent my time varied at different times in my life, my accent was malleable so it would continue to change. I picked up some more Italian-American influence, then I took on Spanish so my bank of phonemes is now larger because I speak three languages (one Germanic, one Romance, one Austronesian). I changed workplaces from Babyolian Suburbia to a place with more people from urban neighbourhoods, so I went from working with pretty much mostly white people and now I work with Latin-Americans and urban black people and a few Jamaicans. Also, I spend most of my leisure time with my girlfriend and at times, with her family who lived in Oxfordshire and Westminster in their time in England so I get a mix of RP in there, too.

    I adapt my accent to whomever I'm speaking these days.

  • Does your accent match where you live?
    For the most part, it does. It's mostly North Jersey-ian but I enunciate more as part of the influence speaking Spanish and the RP English has had.

    My region's accent gets a bit lazy, sometimes. These are common in my area but I don't typically say in my most natural voice:
    Winter is pronounced "winner."
    Counter is pronounced "cowner."
    Center is pronounced "senner."
    Drawer becomes "drawr."
    Don't know is pronounced "don know."

  • If you speak more than one language, do you have trouble adapting accents with other languages?
    I don't really find much trouble. I very rarely speak Filipino these days, so sometimes I'll trip on pronouncing words I used to do very naturally.

  • Do your parents/people who raised you have the same accent as you do?
    No. They've retained their Filipino accents (though my mother has two different Filipino accents she uses). Sometimes they'll try to adapt but those who know the Filipino accent will identify it right away.

  • What accents can you emulate well?
    I can do a somewhat convincing Australian (general) and RP English.

  • Do certain accents make you more attracted to an individual?
    Yep. I love RP English, Spanish (Castillian), French (Metropolitan and Quebec), Peruvian, Colombian, and Scottish.

Just for kicks, it'd be interesting to hear everyone have a go at my abridged version of an Accent Tag (though I doubt anyone will bother).

Record yourself (Vocaroo will suffice) saying these words: Aunt, Roof, Route, Wash, Oil, Theater, Iron, Salmon, Caramel, Fire, Water, Sure, Data, Ruin, Crayon, New Orleans, Pecan, Both, Again, Probably, Spitting image, Alabama, Lawyer, Coupon, Mayonnaise, Syrup, Pajamas, Caught, Naturally, Aluminium, Envelope.
________________________________________________

If you're interested in comparing regional accents from Ultimate-Guitar users, listen to these recordings.

Canada
Ontario
Ontario 2

United States
Alabama with British influence
California with Russian influence
California with Singapore influence
Florida
Massachusetts with Florida influence
New York (Queens)
New Jersey
Utah with Arizona and Texas influence

Great Britain
England with Canada and Russia influences (London and Bristol)
England (Midlands)
England (South London)
Scotland (Aberdeen)
Scotland (Glasgow)
Wales

Republic of Ireland
Ireland

Republic of Slovenia
Inner Carniola

Bonus round: Do this in a fake accent.
New Jersey attempting RP
Free Ali
Last edited by chrismendiola at May 15, 2015,
#2
1.N/A
2.N/A
3. It's florida, so naturally weird. Few miles that way is southern, a few miles that way is northern. Add on to that being from a pretty diverse city (well, 61% white) and its like having a weird accent squared.
4. Yeah
5. I've got a pretty accurate ability to pronounce spanish correctly without trying, but my spanish is pretty bad
6. Nah, both from different areas (hick town up north and country accent 'up' south)
7. I jokingly emulate all accents with my friends in a bastardized italian way "Whatddya meeeann I dont sounda like thee Tony Montana?)
8. Yeah, anything non-US/Canada


Also, I've never heard an authentic new england accent to my knowledge (or at least cant recall/remember in particular), but advertisements that stress them piss me off
.
#3
australian accents are legitimately terrible and caribbean patois is not an accent




#4
Quote by MinterMan22
australian accents are legitimately terrible and caribbean patois is not an accent

I got the vibe that it wasn't an accent. I couldn't find a term for some of the accents (the certain Jamaican one I tried to identify is one of those), so not every "accent" I listed is really an accent but a generalisation of some kind of identifier for that accent. If this is offensive, I will change it to something more appropriate. Just let me know.
Free Ali
Last edited by chrismendiola at May 4, 2015,
#5
Patois is a French word that doesn't have a real meaning but is used informally to refer to a form of broken language. It's not quite creole and not quite pidgin but something similar.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
Quote by theogonia777
Patois is a French word that doesn't have a real meaning but is used informally to refer to a form of broken language. It's not quite creole and not quite pidgin but something similar.

As my understanding has it, Patois, in relation to Jamaica, is what they call their spoken language. I'm only faintly interested in anything to do with English linguistics, so my ignorance is showing quite a bit.

Give me something I can use to replace "Patois" and let's agree to not make the mistake again.
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#7
I was talking to my sister the other day, and she used to say that people would say to her that newscasters would hire south dakotans to do the news since they have the most non-regional american accents

Well that's complete bullshit. I've been trying to limit my drawl but it comes through when I get lazy.
#8
Quote by whywefight
I was talking to my sister the other day, and she used to say that people would say to her that newscasters would hire south dakotans to do the news since they have the most non-regional american accents

Well that's complete bullshit. I've been trying to limit my drawl but it comes through when I get lazy.

What does "most non-regional American accents" mean?
Free Ali
#10
Quote by WaterGod
Standard American English is the one true accent.

Quote by chrismendiola
P.S. - There is no place for ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, or classism in this thread.

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#11
Quote by whywefight
I was talking to my sister the other day, and she used to say that people would say to her that newscasters would hire south dakotans to do the news since they have the most non-regional american accents

Well that's complete bullshit. I've been trying to limit my drawl but it comes through when I get lazy.


North Dakota doesnt exist, so whatever they sound like is the most non-regional american accent
.
#12
Quote by chrismendiola
What does "most non-regional American accents" mean?

it's pretty bullshit really, but basically the idea is that it's an accent that most Americans would agree sounds pretty normal
#13
All accents interest me in some way. I just like listening to people talk and how they pronounce things and their individual mannerisms etc. I can't say for sure which ones are peculiar to me. I guess probably anything which i have to actively listen to in order to understand, and the last time I remember having to do that was for someone from Ethiopa.


My accent changes a bit or a lot depending on who i am speaking to. I was born in Texas, moved to Singapore, moved to California, and moved back to Singapore again. My neutral accent (i forgot the term for this) for when I'm reading to myself or something is mainly Californian but when I speak fast I get a Singaporean rhythm. I go full Singaporean when speaking to Singaporeans because if I don't some people who don't know me think I'm faking my accent and that is not a good first impression. In informal situations I switch entirely to Singlish, which I forgot if it's a creole or a pidgin. For some reason I'm completely unable to do an Indian accent so my mouth always feels awkward and clunky when I'm trying to speak to my relatives in one - the older ones wouldn't understand me at all if i didn't try to fake it. I spend too much time around Australians and in Australia and I used to work with a lot of people from the Philippines so bits of those accents creep in every once in a while too.


My parents are south Indian and speak English with Tamilian accents. They don't have super heavy accents because they have spent the last 25 years outside India, but it's there. They use RP pronunciations for most things but use a few words peculiar to the US.


I don't have any trouble adapting my accent for the other languages I know apart from Tamil, but that is mostly because I suck at differentiating retroflex consonants and when I concentrate too much on getting those right I forget how to do anything else.

I think I'm more attracted to the general sound of someone's voice rather than any accent in particular. I like it when people talk slow though because I usually talk pretty slow too.


I will do the vocaroo thing later.
cat
#14
I'm Australian

I sound like I'm Canadian sometimes.

apparently I do a good Japanese accent which is almost certainly the result of 3 years of Japanese at school
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#15
Quote by whywefight
it's pretty bullshit really, but basically the idea is that it's an accent that most Americans would agree sounds pretty normal

Oh, I get it. Nah, that's actually not bullshit. Many areas have a "default" accent. I don't know what South Dakota residents sound like, but I would agree that there is a general "American accent," as made evident by the fact that people refer to an "American accent."

From the Wikipedia article for "General American," here's an excerpt:

General American (abbreviated as GA or GenAm) is an umbrella variety of American English—a spectrum of accents[1]—unified by a sound system separate from the dialects of the American South and East Coast, including New York City and New England,[1][2][3] but today widespread throughout the United States. Despite persistent debate,[4][5] General American is popularly perceived as lacking any notably regional, ethnic, or socioeconomic characteristics;[6] however, modern studies link its origins to northern speech patterns of the non-coastal Eastern United States,[7] originating from interior Pennsylvania, upstate New York, and the adjacent Midwestern region prior to the Northern Cities Vowel Shift.[1][8]

The term was popularized by the American linguist John Samuel Kenyon, who, in 1930, considered it equivalent to the speech of "the North," or "Northern American,"[9] but, in 1934, "Western and Midwestern";[10] however, the term was disseminated earlier, for example, by the American Anglicist George Philip Krapp, who in 1925 considered it "Western" and wide-ranging.[9] According to British phonetician John C. Wells, typical Canadian English aligns to General American rather than England's Received Pronunciation in every situation where these latter two differ.[11] He also concluded that, by 1982, two-thirds of the U.S. population spoke General American English.[6] Due to its prevalence, General American is sometimes, controversially,[12] referred to as a de facto standard accent of the United States.[6]


Ironically enough, I'd say that this is the one from my area (remember when I said no ethnocentrism? ), but many Americans speak in "General American."

This same phenomenon occurs when people refer to a "British accent." Often, what they mean is Received Pronunciation/"Queen's English," which, as you can see, is referenced in the excerpt.

It is, however, interesting to note how these "default" accents differ in their relative usage in their respective areas. "General American" has been estimated as an accent that is used by most Americans, whereas RP is much less so- less than five percent, if I remember my reading correctly. It's interesting because both are credited as artificial accents in the sense that they were created to standardise speech in media when recorded audio was first being transmitted publicly, but both differed in how they gained traction to popularity in usage, especially since the US has a larger, more diverse (I think?) population, and is many times more vast in terms of size. I'll have to read about theories for this when I find some time.

Here's some brief information on accents, as presented by James May.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMKvUuktSww

At 4:25, he talks about General American and Received Pronunciation, but it's just what I said earlier. Watch it anyway.

TL;DR - There is a "standard" American accent, and this phenomenon exists in other areas, as well.
EDIT 5344: I think I misread. Are you saying that the idea that the South Dakota accent is the most neutral is bullshit? Ya know, rather than the idea that there is a neutral accent?
Quote by guitarxo
All accents interest me in some way. I just like listening to people talk and how they pronounce things and their individual mannerisms etc. I can't say for sure which ones are peculiar to me. I guess probably anything which i have to actively listen to in order to understand, and the last time I remember having to do that was for someone from Ethiopa.


My accent changes a bit or a lot depending on who i am speaking to. I was born in Texas, moved to Singapore, moved to California, and moved back to Singapore again. My neutral accent (i forgot the term for this) for when I'm reading to myself or something is mainly Californian but when I speak fast I get a Singaporean rhythm. I go full Singaporean when speaking to Singaporeans because if I don't some people who don't know me think I'm faking my accent and that is not a good first impression. In informal situations I switch entirely to Singlish, which I forgot if it's a creole or a pidgin. For some reason I'm completely unable to do an Indian accent so my mouth always feels awkward and clunky when I'm trying to speak to my relatives in one - the older ones wouldn't understand me at all if i didn't try to fake it. I spend too much time around Australians and in Australia and I used to work with a lot of people from the Philippines so bits of those accents creep in every once in a while too.


My parents are south Indian and speak English with Tamilian accents. They don't have super heavy accents because they have spent the last 25 years outside India, but it's there. They use RP pronunciations for most things but use a few words peculiar to the US.


I don't have any trouble adapting my accent for the other languages I know apart from Tamil, but that is mostly because I suck at differentiating retroflex consonants and when I concentrate too much on getting those right I forget how to do anything else.

I think I'm more attracted to the general sound of someone's voice rather than any accent in particular. I like it when people talk slow though because I usually talk pretty slow too.


I will do the vocaroo thing later.

Word, here's someone who gets me.
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Last edited by chrismendiola at May 5, 2015,
#16
I speak neutral American English because I learned English from watching TV. Which is kinduva miracle considering where I grew up and how my family talks.
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#17
I think I'll record myself saying the words tomorrow caus no one else is, maybe itll get the ball rolling.

Like a lot of north americans I have a hard time distinguishing my accent, but I'm not gonna be stupid and say I dont have one. Most people interpret Canadian accent as a Newfie (newfoundland/east coast canada), or thats what they sound like when imitate it, with the aboots and ehs, and its really the smallest, most out of the way insignificant part of our country. There's also a huge difference between rural and urban canadian accents too. When people try to do a canadian accent to us it sounds like doing an american accent and sounding like a redneck hick from the deep south.
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Last edited by Wiegenlied at May 5, 2015,
#18
Quote by Wiegenlied
I think I'll record myself saying the words tomorrow caus no one else is, maybe itll get the ball rolling.

Like a lot of north americans I have a hard time distinguishing my accent, but I'm not be stupid and say I dont have one. Most people interpret Canadian accent as a Newfie (newfoundland/east coast canada), or thats what they sound like when imitate it, with the aboots and ehs, and its really the smallest, most out of the way insignificant part of our country. There's also a huge difference between rural and urban canadian accents too. When people try to do a canadian accent to us it sounds like doing an american accent and sounding like a redneck hick from the deep south.

Similar with Australia, most of those that attempt the nasally stuff sound like bogans/derroes (hill-folk).
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Quote by yoman297
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#19
For example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-glHAzXi_M

example of the rural canadian accent

https://youtu.be/Uogdn7zWDmY?t=3m25s

Go to 3:27 - another exaggerate joke of the newfie/rural accent. keep in mind both these videos are made by canadians, so even Russell standard voice is a canadian accent although he's been living in the states for some time now


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHt1KDflWPg

heres a jay baruchel interview, if you listen to him talk for a second, hes a perfect example of what most people around here actually sound like. very slow, dry, nasally, almost sarcastic sounding.
Quote by Night
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Last edited by Wiegenlied at May 5, 2015,
#20
Quote by Wiegenlied
I think I'll record myself saying the words tomorrow caus no one else is, maybe itll get the ball rolling.



I may do it later, and I'll see if I can get my girlfriend to do it if we don't get any posh English participants.
Quote by Pastafarian96
Similar with Australia, most of those that attempt the nasally stuff sound like bogans/derroes (hill-folk).

Whenever I do my Australian accent, I always turn to this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iph39kR1tQs

But I said this to you one of the times you were in Wavelength.fm. At least now you've seen it.
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#21
  • Describe your accent and how it has changed in your lifetime:

    I grew up in Massachusetts so I have a slight Boston accent. Its more subtle than most people who have it though so it tends to not really bother anyone.


  • Does your accent match where you live?:

    Not at all, my friends make fun of me for it all the time.


  • Do your parents/people who raised you have the same accent as you do?:


    Yeah they do. My entire family stems back to living in Massachusetts. It wasn't until maybe 10 years ago that the first people in my whole family decided to leave the state.


  • What accents can you emulate well?:

    None really. I'm terrible at impressions. Unless you count the Monster Jam announcer as an accent, because I realized after getting drunk with one of my friends last week that I can do that pretty well.


  • Do certain accents make you more attracted to an individual?:

    The only one I can think of off the top of my head is Irish accents. I find them really attractive for some reason.


Quote by chrismendiola
Record yourself (Vocaroo will suffice) saying these words: Aunt, Roof, Route, Wash, Oil, Theater, Iron, Salmon, Caramel, Fire, Water, Sure, Data, Ruin, Crayon, New Orleans, Pecan, Both, Again, Probably, Spitting image, Alabama, Lawyer, Coupon, Mayonnaise, Syrup, Pajamas, Caught, Naturally, Aluminium, Envelope.

I'll do this sometime when I'm not lazy.
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Last edited by caeser1156 at May 5, 2015,
#22
Idk what kind of accent I have, but I grew up in pennsylvania so whatevers common here I guess. I don't say "yuns" though, like "all yuns come over here for a second." That's apparently a pennsylvania thing but I cringe whenever I hear it.
#23
I like an irish accent specifically Conor's irish accent. It was the most jangly and beautiful thing I'd ever heard. Too bad he doesn't post anymore. (I think he was irish anyway)
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#24
Quote by chrismendiola

Possible topics of discussion:
  • What accents interest you?
  • What accents are peculiar to you?
  • Describe your accent and how it has changed in your lifetime.
  • Does your accent match where you live?
  • If you speak more than one language, do you have trouble adapting accents with other languages?
  • Do your parents/people who raised you have the same accent as you do?
  • What accents can you emulate well?
  • Do certain accents make you more attracted to an individual?

P.S. - There is no place for ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, or classism in this thread. .

- n/a
- n/a
- i sound like a good canadian kid. always have, always will bud.
- yeah
- yeah, i am decent at french but the problem is i sound like a goon because i can't get rid of my accent
- yeah my dad does
- i can do a pretty good canadian accent, i practice it a lot.
- i like french accents on women other than that just a canadian one i guess? dno pretty big non-factor

its 5am and im not doing shit but waiting for it to be 6 so i can go to bed so i recorded a very low quality reading of your words
#28
Quote by Fat Lard



Also, I've never heard an authentic new england accent to my knowledge (or at least cant recall/remember in particular), but advertisements that stress them piss me off



I was in Boston, and I barely heard the accent there.


I'm sort of between Philadelphia and Baltimore, so I think I get influences from both, but also from the "Pennsylvania Dutch" that the Amish use, as I'm in an area with a large Amish population.

On the whole, I think my accent is pretty neutral. When I hear a standard "American" accent on TV, I think I mostly sounds the way I sound, and the way the people I encounter on a daily basis sound.

Quote by MeTallIcA313
Idk what kind of accent I have, but I grew up in pennsylvania so whatevers common here I guess. I don't say "yuns" though, like "all yuns come over here for a second." That's apparently a pennsylvania thing but I cringe whenever I hear it.



I never hear anyone say "yuns." Not that I notice anyway. I hear "yous" a lot in my area, like "yous guys."

I know some Pittsburgh people say "yinz."
#29
http://vocaroo.com/i/s0VttH80OCzT

I love Welsh accents and European accents like Dutch, Slovenian, Estonian, Swedish.
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


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#32
Quote by Fat Lard



Your pronounciation of theatre was very dramatic. Felt like I was there for a sec


Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


Quote by metal4eva_22
What's this about ****ing corpses? My UG senses were tingling.
#33

Here are my answers to those questions:
What accents interest you?

UK - Northern Ireland
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#34
Yeah you can get a wide variation in such a short distance and sometimes you don't.

These girls are from South Wales and very close to each other.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDayU9lAuJA

Then you have my favourites like Leanne Wood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkbbj4G9UK8

And Howard Marks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLafSIMYNrQ

Robbie Savage is where I am from and I think he sounds different to me also

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTf1sOl2IDg
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


Quote by metal4eva_22
What's this about ****ing corpses? My UG senses were tingling.
#36
my accent is impossible to place geographically


get on my level sonnnnn
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#37
I live in Scranton, and I definitely have a strong Northeastern PA accent. There are a lot of "yous" and "heyna's." I've also been told that, at times, I have a slight hint of a New Yorker accent, but that's probably from watching TV.

I have a very similar accent to my parents and grandparents due to them being born in the area as well. Then again, i think most of the people in the area all have the same accent with slight variations (eg. the country bumpkins have a slight drawl in their dialect).

For those who aren't too familiar, here's a good idea on how people speak around here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sMI2jb16eo
Skip the username, call me Billy
#38
Quote by Baby Joel
my accent is impossible to place geographically

that's called a speech impediment
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#39
Interested in pretty much any accent that I haven't heard b4, although dat welsh ^ sounds fkin cool

I have an aqaintance who's accent I find to be "peculiar" because he's super hard to understand for me. He's from Bangladesh and has a very nasally, high pitched voice.

I'd describe my accent as posh Australian. I can't tell if it's changed but it probably has.

Quote by chrismendiola
Australia - Adelaide

I'm from RADelaide AMA
btw I'm curious what makes u interested in an Adelaide accent specifically, I don't think I've met a stranger overseas/online who even knows about Adelaide


I speak a TINY bit of Italian with grandparents, although it's pretty limited. Recently some cousins of mine from Italy came to stay with us and I felt pretty stupid saying anything Italian. If I did it in my accent I sounded slow/stupid and If I tried putting on an Italian accent then ppl lolled. Luckily they knew more English than I did Italian so we stuck to familiar turf.

rents have the same accent

Can't do any of them well, but It's fun to talk in different accents and see how good you are at changing your 'natural' voice.

I definitely think ur voice can affect how attractive u are. I'm gonna be an arse and just say generic Irish, although anything different to what I'm used to can be attractive, provided it isn't annoying.
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