#1
Also, how do I protect my current screw holes whilst repainting and laquering it?
#2
drill the holes to a size you can glue a wooden dowel in them, cut off the excess and sand flush.

put screws in the holes before you paint
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
Quote by Robbgnarly
drill the holes to a size you can glue a wooden dowel in them, cut off the excess and sand flush.

put screws in the holes before you paint


And now you say it, it seems so obvious! Thanks for the info.
#4
Quote by Robbgnarly
drill the holes to a size you can glue a wooden dowel in them, cut off the excess and sand flush.

put screws in the holes before you paint



Yep, that's pretty much the best advice possible.

/thread
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
Thanks guys. I was just about to ask a similar question because when I recently installed a Bigsby B7 on my Les Paul I discovered the hole for the strap pin was stripped. I cut off a few tooth picks and filled the hole with them and replaced the screw but I wanted a more permanent solution and this is it. Thanks again.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
drill the holes to a size you can glue a wooden dowel in them, cut off the excess and sand flush.

put screws in the holes before you paint


Thats a good way.

What I like to do for general wood repairs, not necessarily for holes in wood is this:
1. Get some fine sawdust. You can drill some holes in some scrap wood or use a rasp. rough file, whatever gets you some fine grained sawdust.
2. Mix the sawdust with wood glue. Titebond works best IME.
3. Mix to a consistency of peanut butter. Maybe a little thinner, like honey.
4. Fill in the hole or wherever its needed. Overfill it a little bit as it will shrink some.
5. Sand it down.

I call it "CodeMonk's Deluxe Homemade Wood Putty™".
Last edited by CodeMonk at May 7, 2015,
#8
If you want it to be structurally strong, then the dowel is best but will show end grain.

If you want it to look like the original wood surrounding it, then a wooden plug can be made (using a drill-operated special plug cutting bit) from the same species of wood, oriented to have the same grain direction as the guitar wood, and glued into a clean hole (might need a small enlargement and be perfectly round, possibly using a forstner bit). This can be almost invisible and is used on violins where the fill and re-drill peg holes after they have worn out.

The glue and sawdust thing can work to surround a poor inlay but I have never achieved attractive results with it.

Just my own experience.