#1
I've been playing guitar for a little over a year and I've been learning songs every now and then, and I know the am pentatonic scale but what other scales should I learn? Also what makes the Am pentatonic scale, A minor? Can you move the scale up to the 7th fret and it be a Bm pentatonic scale? Sorry if I sound moronic, I just have questions lol.
#2
It's not moronic. We all have to start somewhere.

There are a lot of scales out there and most of the time they're probably best remembered as patterns. For example, E Major in tab and on just the E string would be:

0-2-4-5-7-9-11-12.

Move that pattern up one fret and it becomes F Major. For easiest and most flexible play, work it out across multiple strings.

Now, for more variety, you can learn 'Modes'. Basically, take the major and start it from a different point in the pattern. So, taking the same scale and shifting mode to start on the second note would get you:

2-4-5-7-9-11-12-14.

There are names for all of these modes, but I don't know them all off by heart. The one above would be F# Dorian, I believe. There is a chart here: http://www.premierguitar.com/ext/resources/archives/0859e0fe-f0df-44df-b852-26fbe3209c1d.JPG
#3
Learn the pentatonic, blues scale, major, and minor scales and you're all set. They're all very similar and fit into each other. If you learn the 5 shapes to the minor scale, and go from there, you'll be able to easily play everything else.

Playing scales as E or A as your root note is the most common, but you can easily move these scale patterns up and down the neck the same as you mentioned. Good luck!
#4
Oh alright so the E major scale would go as: E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D# with E on the 12th fret being the octave, but on different strings the octave would be the 2nd fret of the 4th string (counting down from thickest to highest.) And then you find F# on the 4th string because the only F# on the 3rd string is the 11th fret, then its to the 1st fret of the third string for G# and just keep going till you reach E again which would be the open 1st string.
So the tabs would look like this?
e-------------------------------------0------------
B--------------------------------2-4--------------
G------------------------1-2-4-------------------
D----------------1-2-4---------------------------
A--------0-2-4-----------------------------------
E-0-2-4------------------------------------------

Again Im sorry if I'm wrong or sound stupid haha, I'm wanting to make sure that I have this right. Thank you!
Last edited by ajsbored at May 7, 2015,
#5
That major scale is good, but if I may, I'm going to offer the advice of someone with classical training:
Theory and Scales are almost completely useless unless you know how to correctly apply them i.e. when to use what scale in which key (on a piano I know there are other uses but those are defunct on a fretboard).

However you seem like you know what your doing for the most part, the Am pentatonic does become a Bm pentatonic if moved up two frets to answer your question. Also with Pentatonic scales, each major key has a relative minor key, which is the same shape and position in pentatonic scales but you let a different note 'dominate' over the scale when playing.

(always happy to elaborate or try to re-word what I've said if you're confused/interested)
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#6
Thank you!
And yes, if you dont mind can you explain what you mean by "Also with Pentatonic scales, each major key has a relative minor key, which is the same shape and position in pentatonic scales but you let a different note 'dominate' over the scale when playing."
#7
Alright, let's take the E minor pentatonic box at 0:

|-------------------------------[color="Red"]0[/COLOR]--3---|
|--------------------------0--2--------|
|--------------------0--2--------------|
|--------------0--[color="Red"]2[/COLOR]--------------------|
|--------0--2--------------------------|
|--[color="Red"]0[/COLOR]--3--------------------------------|


The red numbers represent the E notes in the scale and are the dominant notes, if you start and end on the red numbers you'll play a normal E minor pentatonic.

However if you start and end playing on the G notes in the same scale:

|------------------------------0--[color="Blue"]3[/COLOR]---|
|--------------------------0--2-------|
|--------------------[color="Blue"]0[/COLOR]--2-------------|
|--------------0--2-------------------|
|--------0--2-------------------------|
|--0--[color="blue"]3[/color]-------------------------------|


You'll find that you're playing it that it'll sound happier despite having the same notes. This is because you aren't playing in E minor anymore, you're playing in G major. That is because the relative major of E minor is G major. If we move it all up one fret, it becomes a F minor/Ab major pentatonic.

If you move into full major and minor scales, there is only one note's difference between the major and the relative harmonic minor (no such thing as just a 'minor' scale).

Yet again, if I've gone overboard, I'll try to simplify it until one of us gives up.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#8
Alright, so starting and ending on the dominate notes determines whether the scale is minor or major? So if you moved it up to the A note, the major of that minor would be B?
Again thanks in helping me, and sorry if it's aggravating lol.
I just don't want to be another guitarist who doesn't know much
#9
Yes, the note you start/end on determines whether you're using the major or minor application. but no, if you moved the G major up to A the relative minor is F# minor.

If you haven't done already, learn the fretboard notes, they help with working out what key you're in.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
Last edited by Pastafarian96 at May 9, 2015,
#10
Alright. Where should I start learning about scales, I kinda went into this half cocked.