#1
Hi
I have been playing for 18 months or so. I am learning using a few teaching apps ( rock prodigy, coach guitar etc) and copying from tabs / you tube lessons. I believe I am making good progress as I can play (copy) some lead, rhythm and finger picking sections of songs e.g . Led Zeppelin stairway to heaven. I am getting keener and really enjoying the playing and want to get loads better.

What do you advise
1) keep on with this or
2) get some lesson So?

Thanks

Quickblast
#2
If you have time and money, and can find a good teacher, I see no reasons not to get some lessons. You can totally learn stuff by yourself, but a teacher guiding you and telling you what are you doing right or wrong makes stuff easier.

I was taking lessons before, but I had to leave because of time and money. My progress is slower now, but I have no choice.
Last edited by DanyFS at May 9, 2015,
#3
The art of teaching yourself.

You get belief the more you learn to trust yourself teaching yourself on what you want to do.

The down side is outside help means less to you.

I learned on my own pre internet with the tools I had access to to get to any given point with my playing skills. My ears always tell me when and where I was compared to to what I wanted to learn.

That habit is still there and I play drums too. Though I have spend more years /decades with the guitar than playing drums.

Still here I can use the tools I got and make it sound well enough and knowing what I need thanks to experience.

So learn what you want and always practise your weak spots. Use the tools available to learn on your own. Get into the habit of doing that and use your ears to tell you where you are. Also get a metronome to improve faster while get some rhytm into it.
#4
Quote by anders.jorgense
The art of teaching yourself.

You get belief the more you learn to trust yourself teaching yourself on what you want to do.

The down side is outside help means less to you.

I learned on my own pre internet with the tools I had access to to get to any given point with my playing skills. My ears always tell me when and where I was compared to to what I wanted to learn.

That habit is still there and I play drums too. Though I have spend more years /decades with the guitar than playing drums.

Still here I can use the tools I got and make it sound well enough and knowing what I need thanks to experience.

So learn what you want and always practise your weak spots. Use the tools available to learn on your own. Get into the habit of doing that and use your ears to tell you where you are. Also get a metronome to improve faster while get some rhytm into it.


this makes like no sense at all

lessons from a good teacher will help you in so many ways. you will see faster progress and get a chance to have someone else evaluate your skills. just a simple thing like how to hold a pick can make a huge difference. these kind of things don't translate well from videos.
#5
Yes to a point. How much do the teacher teach you what you want to learn?

There are no 100% one way only on how to play an instrument but sure if you are depended on other people to teach you sure then that is your habit of best working progress.

Holding a guitar pick? I looked at a poster of Kirk Hammett I had back in the early '90s. I still hold the pick like that. I made it work for me. Who can tell how the 100% right way is to hold a pick?

The basic thing is still:

You sit with your guitar with the thing to learn and a metronome. Maybe a copy of a soundbite so you know what it should end up sound like.

Next you got the notes down and now it is a matter to get it into a habit so it becomes natural.

That is the basics of learning guitar. Your ears will tell you where you are at any given point.

Guitar playing can't really be judged for wrong and right. Thank god for that!! Amen.

The question here is what can the teacher give you that you can't teach yourself when the basics of learning guitar is so simple to do?
Last edited by anders.jorgense at May 9, 2015,
#6
I got my first guitar in 1988. An acustic Jasmine S60 which I still got and it plays fine to.

Naturally I could not play a note and guitar lessons followed paid my parents. I did not have a clue on what I wanted to learn or how a guitar really could sound like. Sure I had heard guitar playing at that point but nothing that inspired me to pick out as something I desired to get down.

I guess I had lessons for a year or so. Did it pay of? Some of the stuff which comes down to 3 licks are still there and he did show me smoke on the water on the low E when I brought the song to him. That song is in G I later learned on my own. As I went after that to a new school the lessons finished. Still I felt I could not play a note.

What changed?

The new school were great on one point only and that was the musical inspiration I could get from fellow students record collections.

After those dreadful 2 years I saved up for my first electric guitar and found out I could get tab books on my favorite band at the time. So I got Black album and Kill'em'all send to me and started learning that stuff.
#7
anders buddy you have a bit of an attitude here. i started playing in 1978 before there were sound bites, internet or tabs. back then you pretty much had to learn from others or a few mel bay books with basic Chords in them.

understand what a good teacher is and isn't. a guy who just shows you songs without explaining what is going on at least basically from a theory standpoint isn't a good teacher. songs or licks from songs should be used to illustrate techniques and theory so you know what and why something was done. a good teacher will give you the tools to play a guitar and know what you are doing. when i had the time i did teach.

yeah dude there isn't one way to hold a pick but there are certainly wrong ways that will impede your playing and often break strings. there are also ways to hold it to increase picking speed etc. you ain't getting all that from a poster.

guess you had a bad experience with a teacher but that dosn't mean they are all no good or it isn't a good idea. i assure you that after a year with me you would know how to play more than smoke on the water on the low e string.
#8
Find a good teacher whose interests coincide with yours. He/she will teach you theory and good habits, and how to avoid bad ones. I'm also a long way pre-internet (started early 60s), and I had a reasonable groundwork in theory from piano lessons a long time before I started playing guitar. I gave up on the piano, but the theory was a great help when I started playing the guitar. I now regret not have ore than a few guitar lessons.
#9
Nope the poster showed me how to hold a pick!! I did not mention speed!

Attitude sure and I am sorry but as said you develop yourself more by teaching yourself and that is why it comes across in my writing sometimes! Experience counts.

I did not have a bad teacher or felt that either. I had no idea about what I wanted to learn and so it was. Going to lessons was I wonder what he wants me to learn today. I did not have a plan on what to play and I don't recall my then teacher had but can't say he was bad at it.

Life teaches you unless you decide what you want to learn!! If you do not decide someone else will.

Speed came from finally sitting down with a metronome a Troy Stetina book combined with a song by Yngwie.
#10
Quote by anders.jorgense
Speed came from finally sitting down with a metronome a Troy Stetina book combined with a song by Yngwie.


So you took lessons from Troy using the media of a book and it worked really well for you. Your development may have been even quicker if you had a teacher, like Troy, that you saw every week.

Food for thought.
#11
Sure u can go get lessons you can go 2 times a month 3 times.
Just to see where u are but find a good teacher
#12
Thanks for the thoughts. I think, on balance that having lessons is a good idea. I think Personal feedback and work carefully thought out to move me forward will accelerate my development and enjoyment. Whilst I can copy I don't understand the theory and that I think is a limiting factor. Research this weekend found the perfect tutor a few miles away so I shall crack on and contact him tonight.
Thanks again for the thoughts and advice.
#13
I'll throw my tuppence in here.
I have never had lessons, I hope to be able to get some in the future, even though I am happy with my progress atm.

My experience with teachers comes from sending my daughter (9) to violin lessons.
She was at teacher "A" for about a year, massive improvements all the time, close to prodigy level apparently. Better player aged 7 than most 16 year olds.

Unfortunately this teacher was unable to continue, off with some orchestra for a year. She recommended her niece that had just qualified to whatever level.

Progress under her niece is non existent, I have to try and "teach" / motivate my daughter myself now. Although I did this already, it wasn't needed previously.

I would say get lessons If you can afford both the time and money, but also ensure the teacher is a good one, otherwise you may lose motivation and or show no progress.
"If I didn't know I was a genius, I wouldn't listen to the trash I write."
Last edited by Floyd Pepper at May 11, 2015,
#14
I think there is benefits of both (simultaneously) for sure. But learning the 'right way' to do things is important for me, but finding a good teacher that you get on with can be hard.

I know some great players who have had copious amounts of lessons and/or studied guitar performance at degree level, but also know great self taught players too.
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#15
Quote by SpiderM
So you took lessons from Troy using the media of a book and it worked really well for you. Your development may have been even quicker if you had a teacher, like Troy, that you saw every week.

Food for thought.


Maybe but it would have if I had done it back in 1995 instead of 2014!! Not that my age had anything to do with it. I still learn rather quick on my own.
#16
I've been playing for 40 years now and I wish I had taken lessons when I started. You can learn a lot on your own (as many of us have) but you will learn faster, better and have a more complete understanding of how to play correctly and develop more as a musician with a good teacher. I say musician rather than guitar player because it depends on your goals. Some people want learn to play in a specific style and only that style. Nothing wrong with that and if that is where your interest is, maybe you don't need structured lessons where you learn to read music, practice obscure scales, play songs you don't like etc. If your interest is in one area of guitar playing you can probably get along with learning the basics and watching videos on YouTube that explore those styles of playing. Once again don't misunderstand me, this is not a negative criticism. If that's what you want to do go for it and have fun.

On the other hand if you want to do more playing in a lot of styles and branch out in the future maybe making music a career (part time or full time), a good teacher will help you become a well rounded player who can jump in and play in any style with any group of musicians. It will also stop you from developing bad habits that are really hard to break once you've been doing them for a few years.

At this point in my life, I am not going to start take lessons as I am what I am (as Popeye would say), but I wish I had taken serious lessons when I started playing. I would be a much better musician.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 11, 2015,
#17
Quote by Rickholly74
I've been playing for 40 years now and I wish I had taken lessons when I started. You can learn a lot on your own (as many of us have) but you will learn faster, better and have a more complete understanding of how to play correctly and develop more as a musician with a good teacher. I say musician rather than guitar player because it depends on your goals. Some people want learn to play in a specific style and only that style. Nothing wrong with that and if that is where your interest is, maybe you don't need structured lessons where you learn to read music, practice obscure scales, play songs you don't like etc. If your interest is in one area of guitar playing you can probably get along with learning the basics and watching videos on YouTube that explore those styles of playing. Once again don't misunderstand me, this is not a negative criticism. If that's what you want to do go for it and have fun.

On the other hand if you want to do more playing in a lot of styles and branch out in the future maybe making music a career (part time or full time), a good teacher will help you become a well rounded player who can jump in and play in any style with any group of musicians. It will also stop you from developing bad habits that are really hard to break once you've been doing them for a few years.

At this point in my life, I am not going to start take lessons as I am what I am (as Popeye would say), but I wish I had taken serious lessons when I started playing. I would be a much better musician.


yeah a lot of us old timers are kinda in the same boat. i didn't take lessons until i had already been playing for 8 or 9 years and even then only did the lesson thing for maybe a year. it did help for sure though. having someone elses ears and eyes helps any way you look at it. most of us are our own worst critics or can't really judge ourselves accurately. either way it's not good. bad habits are indeed very hard to break so there is that to. the one cool thing i was able to do in that time was go into a recording studio and record a couple of my originals (still have them on cassettes somewhere). being able to hear yourself playing is really interesting and tells the tale way better than your memory.
#18
Quote by anders.jorgense
Maybe but it would have if I had done it back in 1995 instead of 2014!! Not that my age had anything to do with it. I still learn rather quick on my own.


Yeah, I'm not sure I'm a quick learner myself but I do think that I know how to use my practice time well. Part of this I have always had but I also picked some of it up of my instructor. Everyone is a bit different on this front and I think some people benefit more from lessons than others (but I think all would benefit in some way).

RickHolly74's comments rang true with me. I feel I could stop lessons now and keep learning/playing similar songs but I want to be more of an all round player and be able to easily jam with others/improvise well/express what I want easily on the guitar. I am finding lessons push me towards this and sometimes it is the thought of my next lesson/$$$ I am spending that push me to keep drilling what aren't the most exciting things but will get me to my goals.
#19
The main benefit of a lesson, especially in the beginner and intermediate stage, is someone to diagnose your playing technique and stop bad habits from forming. A good basic lesson can be found online, but having someone actually see and hear you live, makes a big difference to some.
#20
Taking lessons from a good teacher shows you a lot of different aspects of playing guitar that you probably would never explore on your own. These may be things you won't ever want to play in the future but having gone through the experience of playing them gives you sense of confidence in your abilities that you wouldn't have otherwise. Having confidence in your playing is a largely overlooked aspect that all great players have. I think great players know just how good they are and are not intimidated by other musicians and that allows them to be more creative.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 12, 2015,
#21
Quote by Rickholly74
Taking lessons from a good teacher shows you a lot of different aspects of playing guitar that you probably would never explore on your own. These may be things you won't ever want to play in the future but having gone through the experience of playing them gives you sense of confidence in your abilities that you wouldn't have otherwise. Having confidence in your playing is a largely overlooked aspect that all great players have. I think great players know just how good they are and are not intimidated by other musicians and that allows them to be more creative.


honestly no such thing as something you'll never use. i'm always amazed at some of the things i learned years ago that came in handy when writing songs. agree about confidence that is really important.