#1
Hey guys,

Im trying to sell my Ibanez Iron label (sapphire blue) however I had it signed by a band of which I am a big fan of 'In Hearts Wake' as some of you might know this band isnt exactly popular to alot of the rest of the world besides Australia so I think its best to remove theses signatures to avoid devaluing it.

First off the signatures were written with a grey acrylic paint pen. About 5 minutes later I sprayed 1 layer of 'Gloss Varnish (permanent)' spray.

Without damaging the guitar what should I use to remove the signature? I was thinking of using a non lent cloth and metholated spirits.

Regards, Jack
#2
Try lighter fluid.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#3
if it's a famous band or somewhat famous band keep it on there. But if you'd rather remove it I'd try lighter fluid first. WD40 is a good marker and sticker remover too. Thing is though the finish is in the way so it's not going to be easy. My advice would be to try and sell it with the signature on it first.

smart move to seal the signature in though. When a customer met Alex Skolnick of Testament or Kerry King of Slayer what he ended up doing was getting the back of the headstock signed. No gloss , no problem.

the best possible results are going to sound the scariest though. you'd have to lightly sand it off, as we know though there isn't one layer of finish on the guitar so you get away with it. There are very fine and gentle sand papers that are used every day on guitars / furniture so this isn't something out of the ordinary you're doing. Learning/doing this process is great because you can get rid of very fine scratches to minor stuff too. You just need some sand paper, a car buffer (or special drill bit) and some waxes. I probably spent around 30-50$ (canadian) to do so but in the end it justifies because I worked on guitars for years so I made my money back fast on the new tool and all. The best videos to learn are either sullys guitar garage or I remember this guy was customizing motorcycles and talked all about the "buffing" process.
#4
Quote by Tallwood13
if it's a famous band or somewhat famous band keep it on there. But if you'd rather remove it I'd try lighter fluid first. WD40 is a good marker and sticker remover too. Thing is though the finish is in the way so it's not going to be easy. My advice would be to try and sell it with the signature on it first.

smart move to seal the signature in though. When a customer met Alex Skolnick of Testament or Kerry King of Slayer what he ended up doing was getting the back of the headstock signed. No gloss , no problem.

the best possible results are going to sound the scariest though. you'd have to lightly sand it off, as we know though there isn't one layer of finish on the guitar so you get away with it. There are very fine and gentle sand papers that are used every day on guitars / furniture so this isn't something out of the ordinary you're doing. Learning/doing this process is great because you can get rid of very fine scratches to minor stuff too. You just need some sand paper, a car buffer (or special drill bit) and some waxes. I probably spent around 30-50$ (canadian) to do so but in the end it justifies because I worked on guitars for years so I made my money back fast on the new tool and all. The best videos to learn are either sullys guitar garage or I remember this guy was customizing motorcycles and talked all about the "buffing" process.


I'll try selling it with the signatures first and see where it gets me thanks for the response!
#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Try lighter fluid.



Naptha is the name here in Oz. I don't think it will work, I've ever affected a paint finish with it, but you never know.

A heavier solvent, like gasolene, benzene or paint thinner should work and paint stripper certainly would, and they might not affect a catalysed poly finish. - Try it on an inconspicuous spot, eg under the pickguard, first.
#6
T Cut, Braso (metal polish) even toothpaste or any other fine cutting compound.

I would be loath to use any solvents as they can soften the surface leaving a bloom or even marking with a cloth as you rub them.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.