#1
So far, I have only been learning to play songs. But I found out that it is pretty tough challenge, and songs, that are fair simple(like dead city radio rob zombie or enter sandman) I learn for a long time. Solo part is a killer for me. I thought that I do something wrong. I started playing guitar year ago, at first, I learned basic chords like D, C, F and etc. Then I just started playing songs. What I want to ask, should I change something here if I want to become better as quick as possible? Do enter sandman(without solo) should take two weeks of practising maybe 1 hour a day?
#2
Getting better "quickly" means practicing, minimum, 2 to 4 hours per day. Assuming you have at least a normal amount of talent, you will be playing some amazing solos within a year.

1 hour a day is really a bare minimum for being functional on guitar.
#3
Quote by reverb66
Getting better "quickly" means practicing, minimum, 2 to 4 hours per day. Assuming you have at least a normal amount of talent, you will be playing some amazing solos within a year.

1 hour a day is really a bare minimum for being functional on guitar.

What I mean, practising is not equal to what you practise. I want to ask whether just learning songs is best way to get better.
#4
You need to have a direction. If the songs you practice go on the direction of your practice, great.

My suggestion is that you should learn/practice a technique you need/learn with exercises first, and then implement those in the songs you want.

For example: if you want moderate alternate picking, you can do exercises for it, and then implement what you learned on the riffs of Fear of The Dark.

Thing is: exercises will help you to build some solid foundation for your technique, which really helps both on the short and the long term!
#5
There is no one single answer here. The more songs you know, the better you will be, but it could slow your progress if those songs aren't challenging you. Learn songs that challenge your technique both mental and physical.

If you're learning from tabs, quit and start learning by ear. I'm not as anti-tab as most people on this site, but ear training is super important. I use tabs sometimes for difficult passages, usually multiple instrument harmonies I'll have trouble with sometimes, but I always combine them with my ears to make sure of their accuracy. As just a general rule, I'd advise that for every 10 songs you learn, try learning 8 or 9 by ear and pick a song that just completely baffles you to learn by tab. As you get better, fewer and fewer songs will completely baffle you, and you'll find that you can figure most of them out by ear as quickly as you would from a tab. It also is a surefire way to improve your improvisational abilities later on. The sense of accomplishment you'll have from learning a difficult solo by ear will far exceed learning it from a tab.

When it comes to specific techniques like alternate/economy picking, legato, etc., its often best to just practice those specific techniques by themselves. Find 3 or 4 notes that sound good together, and practice picking them in multiple ways at different speeds, in different orders, and with varying dynamics. In my personal experience, I always combined many different methods of practicing at the same time. I have always been actively learning a new song or songs and I don't see that ever changing. Likewise i'm always searching for a lick that I can't play well to practice on, and that too will never change.

Bottom line like I said, just challenge yourself. Find a goal and challenge yourself to reach it, then move on to another goal, rinse repeat.
#6
Learn chords and start off with 2 chord and 3 chord songs and work your way up its not easy.
Justin guitar is good he has east songs and he is a good teacher
#7
Quote by Tazz3
Learn chords and start off with 2 chord and 3 chord songs and work your way up its not easy.
Justin guitar is good he has east songs and he is a good teacher


Did you even read his post dude?
#8
Quote by jlowe22
There is no one single answer here. The more songs you know, the better you will be, but it could slow your progress if those songs aren't challenging you. Learn songs that challenge your technique both mental and physical.

If you're learning from tabs, quit and start learning by ear. I'm not as anti-tab as most people on this site, but ear training is super important. I use tabs sometimes for difficult passages, usually multiple instrument harmonies I'll have trouble with sometimes, but I always combine them with my ears to make sure of their accuracy. As just a general rule, I'd advise that for every 10 songs you learn, try learning 8 or 9 by ear and pick a song that just completely baffles you to learn by tab. As you get better, fewer and fewer songs will completely baffle you, and you'll find that you can figure most of them out by ear as quickly as you would from a tab. It also is a surefire way to improve your improvisational abilities later on. The sense of accomplishment you'll have from learning a difficult solo by ear will far exceed learning it from a tab.

When it comes to specific techniques like alternate/economy picking, legato, etc., its often best to just practice those specific techniques by themselves. Find 3 or 4 notes that sound good together, and practice picking them in multiple ways at different speeds, in different orders, and with varying dynamics. In my personal experience, I always combined many different methods of practicing at the same time. I have always been actively learning a new song or songs and I don't see that ever changing. Likewise i'm always searching for a lick that I can't play well to practice on, and that too will never change.

Bottom line like I said, just challenge yourself. Find a goal and challenge yourself to reach it, then move on to another goal, rinse repeat.


although i agree tht learning by ear is important it may be to soon for the OP to rdeally make it work. you really have to be able to hear the notes and chords and be able to differentiate them. this isn't a skill that most players have a year into things.

tabs are fine and can be a good way to learn. i need to learn a song quick then that's the route i take. saves on time. the important thing is to try to learn what is being done in the song from a theory standpoint. just miming notes won't help in the long run.
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
although i agree tht learning by ear is important it may be to soon for the OP to rdeally make it work. you really have to be able to hear the notes and chords and be able to differentiate them. this isn't a skill that most players have a year into things.

tabs are fine and can be a good way to learn. i need to learn a song quick then that's the route i take. saves on time. the important thing is to try to learn what is being done in the song from a theory standpoint. just miming notes won't help in the long run.


He should at least be conscious that ear training is important and tabs can't cut it for that. When i was a super beginner, I'd play single whole notes on the guitar along with a song, and after a while, its fairly easy to discover which notes sound best, and turn them into chords. Tabs are incredibly useful, I'm not anti tab, but if one has decent technique, they should certainly begin learning some simple songs by ear.
#10
Quote by reverb66
Getting better "quickly" means practicing, minimum, 2 to 4 hours per day. Assuming you have at least a normal amount of talent, you will be playing some amazing solos within a year.

1 hour a day is really a bare minimum for being functional on guitar.


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