#1
I'm thinking on buying an Electric/Acoustic guitar. I already got an acoustic Yamaha. But I think it's time for a change. I was thinking of buying a Martin lx1e Ed Sheeran Signature Guitar. I think it's a pretty cool guitar. I like it very much. The thing is that it's kinda small. I want to know if the size of the acoustic box makes a difference once it's plugged to the amp. Which uses can you see in this guitar?. It would be cool if you recommend me other Electric/Acoustic guitar too.
Last edited by aldoram2 at May 13, 2015,
#2
Not sure if it'll make a big impact when plugged into an amp, although I would imagine it does.

But I went to London to try out a load of acoustics a year ago with the intention of purchasing the Martin LX1 which I believe is pretty similar to the Ed Sheeran one.

It sounded thin harsh and overall just a little bit naff unplugged. Ended up coming home with the Taylor GS mini in mahogany which blew away everything else I tried. You can buy an electric system which slots straight into the GS mini from Taylor themselves which is meant to be pretty boss.
Comparison of the two.
https://youtu.be/NuFY885fKxA?t=3m47s

Just thought it might be something worth looking at.
#3
Size matters, yes. The acoustics of the guitar will definitely affect the sound whether plugged or unplugged. That said, consider the negatives and positives of each...

A larger body guitar will pick up and resonate with whatever frequencies it is designed to amplify, usually the ones you're playing (we'd hope.) That can lead to feedback, particularly the monotone lower-frequency type. If you're playing LOUD then it takes some fairly sophisticated engineering to get that to work correctly.

A large body acoustic/electric might sound fuller and warmer, but may prove to be more temperamental in a live setting, especially at a small venue like a bar. The smaller body is less likely to do that, though the natural tone may not be as warm.

It also depends on the quality and type of pickup in the instrument. As I found in my experiments with clamping a humbucker into the sound hole on an acoustic guitar, the feedback was pretty extraordinary!

A quality pickup will work fairly nicely. You'll also pay for it.

A guitar doesn't have to be "warm" to sound good, and in fact if you are playing in a band you might opt for a smaller body because the low end may be carried by your bass player, or a second guitarist, or both?

If you think like a producer and put that instrument into context of the rest of the band (assuming there's a band) then you won't always want the biggest, fullest sound out of the instrument.

If you like it then buy it, I say!
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#4
Quote by aldoram2
I'm thinking on buying an Electric/Acoustic guitar. I already got an acoustic Yamaha. But I think it's time for a change. I was thinking of buying a Martin lx1e Ed Sheeran Signature Guitar. I think it's a pretty cool guitar. I like it very much. The thing is that it's kinda small. I want to know if the size of the acoustic box makes a difference once it's plugged to the amp. Which uses can you see in this guitar?. It would be cool if you recommend me other Electric/Acoustic guitar too.
The, "little Martin", seems to be Ed Sheeran's "schtick". Nobody else much uses it. Not that the two phenomena are directly linked but,"Tiny Tim", sold at lot of records standing up with a uke, and singing in one of the most annoying falsettos EVER! So, IMHO, Ed Sheeran's tiny guitar is a fad, nothing more.

You can always get rid of bass with EQ, without much penalty. However, trying to recover it, is a much different story. Flabby, loose, or non existent bass, does not boost well.

Dreadnoughts are notorious for boom, and that boom is in the range where feedback is most prevalent. Go to an EVEN BIGGER BODY, jumbo, grand auditorium, even grand symphony you'll have bass which is deeper, but more linear and tighter. In fact, you'll see Emmy Lou Harris (a small female). with Gibson's largest body, the SJ-200. The same goes for Taylor Swift, and her GA Taylors.

Any chatter about acoustic guitars feeding back, has to include sound hole plugs. In most stage contexts, you can't get away without one.

So, while I don't perform on stage, I'll take big body acoustics, whether or not I'm going to plug into my amps.

Thin line instruments are normally thought of as "lead" instruments. Ovation "shallow bowl" instruments were always the most salient examples. Many of the acoustic guitar shredders, had one or more in their arsenal. Pull the plug though and, "eww"!

And BTW, Ed Sheeran was on the 2015, "Victoria's Secret Fashion Show", playing a Stratocaster.
#5
I think the extent to which the plugged in sound reflects the acoustic sound depends on the pickup/preamp system in question. With the Fishman Aura preamp, you get emulations of different kinds of guitar, for example, and my Maton AP5 will go from thin and jangly to warm and jazzy due to its parametric mid control. OTOH, some systems like the K&K are popular because they do a good job of sensing the guitar's acoustic properties, as do those that incorporated a microphone.

Even the where the "acousticness" is being sensed, there is more to it than size. As CC says bigger guitars can boom, and this maybe what you want, but you can choose ones that are tighter sounding, as I have done. If you are mostly interested in amplified sound, then I can see arguments for getting guitar that doesn't have a big up-front acoustic voice. - But it isn't just about size.

If I wanted a small guitar, I would be looking first at the Taylor GS Mini.
Last edited by Tony Done at May 13, 2015,
#6
I'm not a pro player at all, but even with my short time playing I'm looking at a bigger bodied guitar. The Fender Malibu I have is smaller than most and the lack of bass when playing unplugged is frustrating. If you mostly play plugged then it's probably not as big an issue.
#7
Plugged in it's really a non issue - unplugged is where the size really matters for volume, bass and projection. Most acoustic pickups/internal mics and preamps are automatically designed and set to kill most of the bass frequencies anyway, which are problematic when amplifying.