#1
Hi all!

Can anyone help me improve my rhythm playing?

I can strum on time with a metronome, but I think this is rather non-musical. Although I know some patterns for blues or rock, I really feel very limited.

What can I study or practice in order to improve my rhythm?

Thanks in advance.
#2
I have some rhythm problems as well, and I personally found it to be very useful to learn songs by ear and figure out the rhythmic shapes of different melodic lines/riffs.
I mean, write them down on paper (so you are forced to count them somehow), and then study them over a metronome/feet.

Also, don't be afraid of studying over very slow tempos, as low as needed to allow you to get a certain rhythmic pattern perfect.

And of course, if you have a chance to play with others, that will help too (provided they don't have your same rhytmical problems, or it'll just be a mess ).

P.S: I also studied a book called "Solfège rythmique" by Dante Agostini, that's basically rhythm sight reading, and it may be of some use IMO.
Last edited by Michele_R at May 14, 2015,
#3
Quote by YellowCat
Hi all!

Can anyone help me improve my rhythm playing?

I can strum on time with a metronome, but I think this is rather non-musical. Although I know some patterns for blues or rock, I really feel very limited.

What can I study or practice in order to improve my rhythm?

Thanks in advance.


Study a style of music that puts a heavy emphasis on rhythm?

Funk would be a good one to look into, and blues also even flamenco if you're advanced enough.
#4
Quote by YellowCat
Hi all!

Can anyone help me improve my rhythm playing?

I can strum on time with a metronome, but I think this is rather non-musical. Although I know some patterns for blues or rock, I really feel very limited.

What can I study or practice in order to improve my rhythm?

Thanks in advance.


1) start playing along with records if you aren't already doing that - by that I mean learn songs and play them along with the actual recorded versions. If you are only practicing songs by yourself, then you will develop all kinds of bad rhythm habits - practice with the bands and artist you listen to - it's also infinitely more fun!

2) learn how to play whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, triplets, 8th notes etc. with a metronome in 4/4. Do 4 bars of whole notes, then 4 bars of half notes then 4 bars of quarter notes etc. in succession. My old Classical guitar teacher ( Head of the guitar department at our local University) made me do this when practicing scales. It was annoying at first, but, looking back, it catapulted my rhythmic ability because you really start to become instinctively aware of these different subdivisions.

3) Start tapping quarter notes with your foot when practicing alone.

4) learn to read music notation - just the rhythms really for your purposes - it helps you learn to pay more attention to note durations and when things are happening in relation to tempo.
#5
Quote by YellowCat
Hi all!

Can anyone help me improve my rhythm playing?

I can strum on time with a metronome, but I think this is rather non-musical. Although I know some patterns for blues or rock, I really feel very limited.

What can I study or practice in order to improve my rhythm?

Thanks in advance.


http://www.amazon.com/DICTIONARY-STRUM-PICKING-PATTERNS-GUITAR/dp/0793520908

Best,

Sean
#6
Learn to play funk.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Quote by Michele_R
I have some rhythm problems as well, and I personally found it to be very useful to learn songs by ear and figure out the rhythmic shapes of different melodic lines/riffs.
I mean, write them down on paper (so you are forced to count them somehow), and then study them over a metronome/feet.

Also, don't be afraid of studying over very slow tempos, as low as needed to allow you to get a certain rhythmic pattern perfect.

And of course, if you have a chance to play with others, that will help too (provided they don't have your same rhytmical problems, or it'll just be a mess ).

P.S: I also studied a book called "Solfège rythmique" by Dante Agostini, that's basically rhythm sight reading, and it may be of some use IMO.


Thanks for these tips. I REALLY need to practice my ear to learn songs. I think I can figure out the rhythmic shapes by ear, though.

I have been trying to study at very slow tempo, and I have to say: this is HARD. If I have to play at 30 or 40 bpm, I really mess it up. But as I have seen, I really should practice this.

Here, I use another book, also from an Italian musician, called Pozzoli. Do you know it? I can do a large part of it, but by the middle of the book, it starts to get near to impossible! lol


Study a style of music that puts a heavy emphasis on rhythm?

Funk would be a good one to look into, and blues also even flamenco if you're advanced enough.


Yep. Actually, I am looking to be more oriented towards a specific style. Since I listen to all kinds of music, each week I am in a different mood.

But my teacher and I are leaning a bit towards Jazz, and this is the actual reason for this post.

When I see some rock rhythm, for example, playing is mainly in patterns and, mostly, rhythm is always going on, strumming or letting the sound ring. What I feel is that in Jazz (please correct me if I'm wrong) rhythm: 1) is in different beats of the bar; 2) is not happening all the time, notes are not always ringing. Instead, playing must be done in the very right time inside the music context.

I can do some blues shuffle and some other patterns... I'm sure not advanced enough for flamenco.. and regarding Funk, I have tried some Nile Rodgers stuff (like Chic - Le Freak, or Daft Punk - Get Lucky), and I have a lot of difficulty with it. The pattern is not linear, and his playing is SO smooth, only on a select number of strings...


1) start playing along with records if you aren't already doing that - by that I mean learn songs and play them along with the actual recorded versions. If you are only practicing songs by yourself, then you will develop all kinds of bad rhythm habits - practice with the bands and artist you listen to - it's also infinitely more fun!

2) learn how to play whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, triplets, 8th notes etc. with a metronome in 4/4. Do 4 bars of whole notes, then 4 bars of half notes then 4 bars of quarter notes etc. in succession. My old Classical guitar teacher ( Head of the guitar department at our local University) made me do this when practicing scales. It was annoying at first, but, looking back, it catapulted my rhythmic ability because you really start to become instinctively aware of these different subdivisions.

3) Start tapping quarter notes with your foot when practicing alone.

4) learn to read music notation - just the rhythms really for your purposes - it helps you learn to pay more attention to note durations and when things are happening in relation to tempo.


This is very insightful. And I see that some of your advice I have been doing for a long time, and some I have never done.

1) I don't play with music records, actually. That's because although I can play chords, and some melody, my repertoire is close to nothing. I know loose parts of songs. Riffs of a couple, solos of other couple, intro to one or another... but no full songs And I really want to be able to get better on my rhythm playing in order to be able to play more songs!

2) This is part of my everyday practicing schedule. Metronome started... First, I just play quarter notes on all six strings... than chromatic quarter notes along the fretboard... than 3 notes per string scales patterns on triplets... quarter notes on Pentatonics... And quarter or triplets on Arpeggios. These exercises have been really helping.

I have trying to play whatever figure, enphasizing any note that is not the first beat. So, for example, I concentrate on playing quarter notes, stressing the second beat. It still feels really odd, and, I don't know how, I always come back to stressing beat 1.

3) I have been tapping my foot with the beat. Sometimes to half notes. I will try quarter notes...

4) I can read music notation with some difficulty. More because of the notes, than because of the rhythm. It has been helping, but I think it lacks something...




I may be giving this a try! Thank you!


Learn to play funk.


As I have said above, I have tried some Nile Rogers stuff, without much success. While writing this, I am thinking about a different approach to practicing Funk, so I'll keep trying.


For all the folks who have given your inputs here, thanks a lot. I am sorry I have taken so long to answer, but I really wanted to dedicate my time for an appropriate answer!

Keep rocking!

Best!
#8
If songs like Get Lucky and Le Freak are causing trouble, maybe get a sheet music with rhythm. Don't follow the notes, just follow the rhythm.


And jazz is really no more rhythmically accurate than rock. Or it depends on the style of course. In punk rock you can pretty much just strum chords. But in many rock songs you need to play really tightly to sound good.

Maybe learn some AC/DC riffs. They aren't that hard, but the rhythms are many times syncopated. For example Highway to Hell - all of the accents are on upbeats.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by YellowCat



While writing this, I am thinking about a different approach to practicing Funk, so I'll keep trying.


Best!



Here's a basic course introducing you to Funk rhythm it's not all that hard. You should maybe go through it. I think it would really help you out in addition once you understand the basic concepts behind the groove, and can play while counting keeping time. It'll be way easier for you to feel out, and transcribe rhythms.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMdU_lS3Izk