#1
I've recently been hired at a local music store. It's a pretty small place, nothing too big. For reference, the biggest item there is some $1.2k Orange tube. They sell some symph band accessories and drums as well.

Anyways, I know the people there pretty well so I can't mess up but so much. I'm just curious if anyone has some advice for me to make things easier and to make me more worth the pay. c: I'll be doing cashier stuff mostly, and some minor repairs when needed.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 14, 2015,
#4
Try selling shit at the counter?

"Oh getting guitar cables? You all good on strings and picks?"

That sort of shmooze is what retail is all about, or so I hear. Despite my plethora of shit past work experiences, retail is not one of them (cashier at a gas station doesn't count).
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#6
I applied once to work at Sam Ash. The manager asked me if I knew my string names in Standard E tuning (EDGwhatever). I was like "nope lol but I know how to play hurr hurr"

I didn't get hired and was depressed for a few months.
#7
Quote by Will Lane
They sell some symph band accessories

Do they rent out instruments to students? If so, that's the biggest thing a music store goes through as far as pushing products and promotions. You can sell those kids and their parents cleaning kits, books, staff paper, copious amounts of reeds, handheld tuners, etc.
#8
Quote by Skullivan
Do they rent out instruments to students? If so, that's the biggest thing a music store goes through as far as pushing products and promotions. You can sell those kids and their parents cleaning kits, books, staff paper, copious amounts of reeds, handheld tuners, etc.

this
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#10
Just be nice to the customers and employees and know how to answer questions. Then maybe in a year or two you will get a promotion and make like $1 more per hour, then eventually by the time you're 40 you will run the place and wish you never started working there in the first place.


Sounds fun!
#11
Quote by Baby Joel
b v nice 2 ery1

ths 2
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#13
be helpful but not pushy, if they don't buy but like you, they may come back and buy when they can. People like to browse, but if they are idiots, you may tell them so.
#14
Quote by Tempoe
be helpful but not pushy, if they don't buy but like you, they may come back and buy when they can. People like to browse, but if they are idiots, you may tell them so.

my man posts reg in musician talk, dun know he's qualified to tell people they're idiots
#15
What you need is a new amp


Is what you should say to every customer
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Facesitting is a violation of freedom of speech, because how can you speak when you have an ass covering your face?
#16
I can't tell you about working at a music store but I can tell you about wanking at a music story
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#18
Quote by eGraham
I can't tell you about working at a music store but I can tell you about wanking at a music story

They do sell trombone slide oil I'm sure.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#19
Quote by Will Lane
Anyways, I know the people there pretty well so I can't mess up but so much. I'm just curious if anyone has some advice for me to make things easier and to make me more worth the pay.

take only upper deckers
KIFFLOM
#21
Quote by snipelfritz
They do sell trombone slide oil I'm sure.



will this fix my rusty trombone?
#22
Ask them if they found everything that they were looking for. I assume you guys can order things to the store if people wanna buy them. Let them know because thats a good way to get people to come back. It drives loyalty.
Quote by JD Close
Piano dick had some good parts, but should have said "As the business man slowly gets boned", would have accented the whole dick feeling of the album
#24
Quote by captainsnazz
it is your duty to inform every customer that guitars are pointless

Like boobs without nipples.
Quote by slapsymcdougal
You can tell if it's eager, because you put your hand down her pants and it feels like a horse eating oats.

Nicest compliment on my looks:
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Putting the 'sex' in 'convicted sex offender'.
#25
Don't hassle or eyeball customers....sure when they walk in, ask if you can help them, but after that, go and do other stuff, don't stare at them.....the number of guitar stores I've gone in looking to buy stuff but have walked out because the dude behind the counter kept eyeballing me I've lost count of.......


Also, Line 6 amplifiers are totally br00talz, make sure you sell plenty of those.
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#26
Quote by snipelfritz
Try selling shit at the counter?

"Oh getting guitar cables? You all good on strings and picks?"

That sort of shmooze is what retail is all about, or so I hear. Despite my plethora of shit past work experiences, retail is not one of them (cashier at a gas station doesn't count).


yes! even if your job doesn't require you to sell extra stuff to people it's an easy way to make conversation (which you might want to slow boring days) and it also makes you feel like you've accomplished something when people leave the store happier and with extra products all because of you

also you can laugh at people like me because I fall for it whenever I'm not shopping alone
cat
#28
Quote by MeTallIcA313
Get ready to hear stairway to heaven played poorly everyday.

as if it could get any worse
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#29
Pretty much like any other job.. MAKE MONEY!!

People buying stuff is good, get them to buy more of it.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#30
I just had my 2nd "briefing" on what I'm supposed to do. I'll have a third briefing which will be my actual training I think on Monday.

It gets complicated. Rentals, ordering, forms, etc. Have to have everything documented. :/
#31
Learn to upsell. Strings, picks, tuners, straps etc.

Whatever accessory is appropriate to the situation at hand. There's a good deal more profit in the accessories than in the instruments.

Also, you're not there to make you look good, you're there to make the customer understand why buying (whatever) will make THEM look good.

Don't argue. Your opinion is unimportant unless you are specifically asked for it, and even then it's only important if the customer is in agreement with you or sincerely wants help. You don't have to agree with something you know is bullshit, but it's not your job to point it out either. It's not the Pit...

Courtesy and confidence =/= cocky arrogance. One works, one doesn't.

Good luck!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#32
Quote by Will Lane
It gets complicated. Rentals, ordering, forms, etc. Have to have everything documented. :/

The devil's in the details, but that's just a small part of the job. I'd make a concerted effort to master all of that nitpicky detail asap. Just get it to be automatic, routine.

Once you are a MACHINE then you can start focusing on selling. Get all of the paperwork to happen subconsciously, like walking. Free your eyes and ears and mouth to say stuff like the others mentioned...

But don't neglect the details. Just spend a day or two focusing in, even make yourself flashcards if you need to.

Will build confidence and reduce the amount of stuff you have to consciously think about day to day, minute by minute:

"Which form was that again?!"

Just be all WHOO-PSH!! and whip that thing out, get what you need out of the customer (name, address, whatever else) and fill out the rest later.

If you did that as my employee I would be impressed.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#33
Your primary goal is to make the business money by extracting the maximum potential out of each customer that walks through that door and to create long term customer loyalty. Sales and service go hand in hand. Good salespeople are psychological geniuses and readers of people. Be able to adjust yourself to different customers. Some are looking for a formal experience, others not so much.

Profit margins are important. No point selling something that doesn't make money. On the flip side, dead stock needs to be gotten rid of as there's nothing worse than dead stock. It gets moved, money is recouped and you have inventory space freed up.

Set yourself targets - Average Transaction Values and Items Per Sale. Someone buys a guitar. Spare strings? Plectrums? Cables? Amp? Effects? Strings? Cleaning accessories? A pack of strings, lemon oil, a few other bits and you suddenly have an extra £30-£50 added to the transaction easily. These items are often high margin. I appreciate that your May not get a huge amount of traffic, but a couple of sales with the added high margin IPS like that a day could pay for a huge chunk of your wages.
#34
^^ I know all of this on some level and I hate it when people try that shit on me.

Want an EXTRA THINGY?

No! I want what I came for. That said, once in a while I will purposely bite for a good salesman just because I respect the craft. It's like a tip.

Sure I might chuck the extra high-margin thing in the garbage on the way out, but I feel like it's money well spent, supporting a talented person. Talented people deserve to be recognized and rewarded...

People who memorize a script and try and sell me a load of BS thus wasting my time when I just want to pay and leave for crapsakes?!

Different ballgame.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#35
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
^^ I know all of this on some level and I hate it when people try that shit on me.

Want an EXTRA THINGY?

No! I want what I came for. That said, once in a while I will purposely bite for a good salesman just because I respect the craft. It's like a tip.

Sure I might chuck the extra high-margin thing in the garbage on the way out, but I feel like it's money well spent, supporting a talented person. Talented people deserve to be recognized and rewarded...

People who memorize a script and try and sell me a load of BS thus wasting my time when I just want to pay and leave for crapsakes?!

Different ballgame.


It's not memorising a script. The way talented salespeople, like myself, approach it is by listening to the customer, evaluating what they're purchasing and making suggestions. If they're buying their first decent acoustic, they may not know how important checking the humidity of the environment is. They may need a humidifier. If they come in, buy a guitar, and you're talking about their upcoming gigs, do they have enough strings as backup in case they snap one? It saves them hassle of they sort out the issues there and then, rather than having to come back to make an extra tip, or get stranded with 5 strings on stage. I guarantee that everyone has forgotten an essential accessory purchase at one point or another, and a decent salesperson will remind them. That's listening to your customer, which is the single most important thing in service.