#1
First post here, need some help.

My brother sent me a blackstar HT5 metal amp. It is brand new. I'm getting a lot of buzz in the overdrive Chanel when a guitar cable is plugged in- a guitar doesn't even have to be plugged in, but if I do plug one in, it only makes the buzz a little worse. This happens at any volume. This isn't a normal high gain buzz, it is much louder.

I brought the amp to guitar center to see if they could diagnose the issue. I brought the same guitar cable I use at home. When I plugged in and attached the cable, the amp was dead quiet. They suggested I try a hum x power conditioner. Brought it home and it is still buzzing even with the power conditioner. The only thing different at guitar center was the power cable. I left the one from the amp in the car, and used on of theirs. I have a video but it is too big to attach. Any advice?

Thanks in advance.
#2
You mean the only difference was the power cord, or the head was connected to a cab using a different power cable?
Was the cable you used to connect the guitar to the amp the same?
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
It's a combo amp. The only difference was the power cord. The cable from the guitar to the amp was mine.
#5
Thank you. I'll try a new power cable. The house is old. Built in 1948. I've tried different rooms, and it is the same no matter where I try it. That is why guitar center recommended the power conditioner. It didn't help at all.
#6
Something in your home or a home nearby is probably generating RF interference. You can try shielding your guitar’s electronics cavity and using shielded cables, but that doesn’t mean your amp won’t keep picking it up. The easiest solution, albeit imperfect, is to just buy a noise gate. You may have to put it in the effects loop if the preamp circuit is picking up the hum after the input jack.
Last edited by jpnyc at May 16, 2015,
#7
Pardon my ignorance, but is a noise gate a pedal? I am going to return the power conditioner and use the money to try the noise gate in place of it.

Again, thank you to those that replied.
#8
House built in 1948 huh. If the wiring is original there is not a dedicated ground, only a common/neutral.

I'd suggest getting a power receptacle tester - something like this http://www.harborfreight.com/electrical-receptacle-tester-with-gfci-diagnosis-32907.html.

My guess is you will have an open ground. If so I'd either:

1. Cheaper attempt - wire in a ground to the common/neutral of the outlet with a jumper.
2. Best method - run a new circuit (including breaker) from the panel box using 3-wire and dedicate that to your guitar gear.

And maybe a simpler solution, make sure you remove things like laptops, TVs, stereos, etc from the same circuit you're plugging your amp in to. Also make sure your laptop power cable isn't running through your loop cables - bad noises. . . .

And I just ran into a problem with a power cable so replace that as well.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#9
I'm thinking the same, this is most likely a ground issue. With a house that old, good possibility. I'd see if I could borrow a different power cable just to check and see before buying one.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by Jameskan
Pardon my ignorance, but is a noise gate a pedal?


Yes.

Also follow that very smart advice about your wiring.