#1
Hi, I am just starting to get good at sweep picking, I have been playing for some time now, I can shred 3 string arpeggios easily and as fast as possible, but I am having trouble making up my own arpeggios that sound good, like I will look at all the notes in e aeolian and pick out notes to make a 6 string arpeggio but it does not sound pleasant, can anyone tab me like 2 or 3 6 string arpeggios in the key of e minor quick that sound awesome or give me advice how to do it my self or both? Thanks. Also, when making an arpeggio if you play one note that is not considered to be in the key of e say if you hit 6 notes, is it still in e ? is that one "wrong" note just considered a accidental or a chromatic passing tone?
Last edited by Frenetixx at May 17, 2015,
#2
My advice would be know the notes on the neck, and then look up and map out the notes which make up the following chords. I'm omitting non-essential tones for strings and fingerings sake:

E min 7 - E G B D

E min 9 - E G B D F#

E min 11 E G B D A

E min maj7 E G B D#

E Maj7 #11 E G# B D# A#

E maj 7 E G# B D#

E sus 2 E F# B

E sus 4 E A B

E7 E G# B D

E 6/9 E G C# F#

Once you've named them all, then you can practice finding different ways to play them, you may find that you'll try tapping some of the notes in addition to sweeping them. You can also work on sequencing and even playing with fragments over a pedal tone.

I recommend that you learn this stuff for yourself. Its a lot easier in the long run. If I didn't know the notes on the neck I could imagine that mapping these arpeggios would take a long time.

Good luck. Have fun!

Best,

Sean
#3
You are in the key of E as long as E feels like the tonic. Playing a couple of accidentals doesn't usually change the key center. So yes, you are most likely still in the key of E. But it depends on the chords you are playing over. Use your ears - does E still feel like the key center? If yes, then you are in the key of E.

In the key of Em I would say the most common accidental is C#. F natural is also pretty common. (I don't consider D# to be an accidental because it is really common to raise the 7th note of the scale, which makes it E harmonic minor.)


Remember that arpeggios are chords. You can't just pick random 6 notes from the scale, because that doesn't necessarily form a chord that would "make sense". Sean posted some Em and E major arpeggios, but in the key of Em not every arpeggio needs to have an E root. You can also build arpeggios on the other scale degrees.

What may also make your own arpeggios not sound that great is the fact that you may not be following the chord changes (if there are any). What I mean is, if the chord in the background is Em, use some kind of an Em arpeggio (like Em7, Em9, whatever). If the chord in the background changes to Am, use some kind of an Am arpeggio (Am6, Am7, whatever). You are still in the key of Am, you are just playing over the iv chord.

I would suggest learning the chords in the key of Em. You need to harmonize the scale. Start the scale with the root, 3rd, 5th and - if you want 7th chords - the 7th.

    R  3  5  7
I   E  G  B  D - Em7
II  F# A  C  E - F#m7b5
III G  B  D  F# - Gmaj7
IV  A  C  E  G - Am7
V   B  D  F# A - Bm7 * 
VI  C  E  G  B - Cmaj7
VII D  F# A  C - D7

* (many times you raise the 3rd and it becomes a B7)


Use this knowledge to build your arpeggios. You can always add more notes to those chords to spice them up. Start experimenting with them.

Remember that you don't need to use all chord tones over the chord. For example over an Em7 chord you could just play G B and D, and it would work.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 17, 2015,
#5
forget how fast you can play..learn music not speed..find the triads of all major and minor chords on ALL sets of strings..and find ways to connect them..do this in all keys..and find ways to go from different keys/chords without a break..

example...Emi GMA DMA Bmi Ama F#mi G#Ma EMA BMA Abmi GbMA Ebmi DbMA Bbmi etc..and their inversions..very important in what you want to do..as you can connect many of these chords with just a one fret change in many cases..

hope this helps

doing exercises like this will show you many "connections" which will allow you to be more fluid in your playing...learn to use the legato style movement more than "sweeping" .. the above will also help you learn the fretboard and "see" chords patterns much easier..and it helps develop your ear..if you don't know diatonic harmony well..learn it..players like satch and govan..check this vid for inspiration..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sItXfTxM5fo...notice how he plays a lot of simple 3 note configerations
play well

wolf
#6
Remember that those "sweep arpeggios" are nothing but the same chords you would play normally. The difference is that you play them as a melody up the neck instead of harmony. Thus, the same chord building from scales theory applies.
#7
^

Same (broken) chords, but re-fingered so that that the fingering pattern = one note per string on adjacent strings whenever possible.
"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#8
Quote by Frenetixx
Hi, I am just starting to get good at sweep picking, I have been playing for some time now, I can shred 3 string arpeggios easily and as fast as possible, but I am having trouble making up my own arpeggios that sound good, like I will look at all the notes in e aeolian and pick out notes to make a 6 string arpeggio but it does not sound pleasant, can anyone tab me like 2 or 3 6 string arpeggios in the key of e minor quick that sound awesome or give me advice how to do it my self or both? Thanks.


If you've already mastered three string patterns, then I would learn four and five string patterns next if I were you. You ultimately want to be able to start the arpeggio on any string and on any chord tone.





Quote by Frenetixx


Also, when making an arpeggio if you play one note that is not considered to be in the key of e say if you hit 6 notes, is it still in e ? is that one "wrong" note just considered a accidental or a chromatic passing tone?


Whether you hear that added non-scale tone as a passing tone or just a clunker depends on when you hit it.

That is, does the "outside" note resolve to a chord tone on a downbeat, etc?

"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#9
Another thing worth looking into is just using the shapes you already know more creatively.

Dmaj/Em = Em11

Bm/Em = Em9

And one more for the crazies:

Eb = Em(maj7) (#11)

(evil laugh)
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp