#1
I've been playing for about a year, and the only solos I can play are the first solo from One and the first solo from Welcome Home (Sanitarium) but I find them a bit boring to play.

I've only tried learning some lead in the past two weeks or so, so I doubt I can play the main solo from One. But I would very much appreciate it if someone could recommend something a bit more challenging and entertaining. Preferably from a metal band such as Metallica or something.

Also I know this is kinda subjective, but If someone could tell me how difficult the solos from Blackened and Master of Puppets are it would be much appreciated. Pretty much just whether or not one of those is a reasonable for the next 5-7 months. I wanna set some kind of attainable goal.

Thanks.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at May 17, 2015,
#2
honestly if you think one of those solos will take 5-7 months to learn then you are trying to play way above your head. personally i'd suggest working with some more easier ones until you can play them fluently. i'd also suggest that if it takes more than a few days to learn the solo then you aren't ready for it yet.
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
honestly if you think one of those solos will take 5-7 months to learn then you are trying to play way above your head. personally i'd suggest working with some more easier ones until you can play them fluently. i'd also suggest that if it takes more than a few days to learn the solo then you aren't ready for it yet.

I have no idea how long it would take me to learn one of those, but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be THAT long. Blackened honestly looks way harder than MoP though. That one is definately too much for me at this point.

By 5-7 months I meant for whatever goal I do end up setting. My current challenge is finding a solo that isn't really boring to play, that I can also master.
Someone recommended the first solo in Sanitarium to start with, but I didn't find that challenging.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at May 17, 2015,
#4
Quote by Cheeseshark
I have no idea how long it would take me to learn one of those, but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be THAT long. Blackened honestly looks way harder than MoP though. That one is definately too much for me at this point.


Not gonna happen. You're not being realistic.

Quote by Cheeseshark
By 5-7 months I meant for whatever goal I do end up setting. My current challenge is finding a solo that isn't really boring to play, that I can also master.
Someone recommended the first solo in Sanitarium to start with, but I didn't find that challenging.


I was the one who recommended that, and I actually recommended trying the 4 guitar solo's in that song because they range in difficulty. Sorry buddy, but if Master of Puppets and Blackened are your idea of exciting solo's then you better come to terms with the fact that you will not be playing them any time in the near future.
#5
The first solo I learned was the first solo from Master of Puppets (ya know, the interlude). I suck at playing leads, I am a rhythm player at heart, but learning that set me in the right direction to play leads at least decently.

You could try. I didn't found it boring to learn, but I don't know about you obviously.

Sweating Bullets solo (Megadeth) isn't too difficult either.
#6
Quote by vayne92
Not gonna happen. You're not being realistic.


I was the one who recommended that, and I actually recommended trying the 4 guitar solo's in that song because they range in difficulty. Sorry buddy, but if Master of Puppets and Blackened are your idea of exciting solo's then you better come to terms with the fact that you will not be playing them any time in the near future.


damn dude a little harsh.

cheeseshark learning stuff can be boring, part of the deal. solos taken out of the context of a song can sound rather boring as well. keep in mind that people often will remember the melody line to a song or the main riff. guitar players are often the only ones that really care about the solos.

now can you actually play the first solo or do you just know the notes (there is a diffeence.) that solo is very melodic and has some nice dynamics to it. that is a big part of playing any solo piece. just spitting notes gets old fast.
#7
Quote by vayne92
Not gonna happen. You're not being realistic.


I was the one who recommended that, and I actually recommended trying the 4 guitar solo's in that song because they range in difficulty. Sorry buddy, but if Master of Puppets and Blackened are your idea of exciting solo's then you better come to terms with the fact that you will not be playing them any time in the near future.


I wasn't saying that I planned on playing either of those solos right now. Just asked whether or not it seemed reasonable for me to attempt one of those in 5-7 months time. Though Blackened is my goal for a while down the road, as in a year or more, due to it being my absolute favorite solo.

I somehow totally forgot that you recommended the other solos from Sanitarium as well, I guess I kinda took a long time actually getting around to it. I will give those a try. I appreciate the honesty.


Quote by DanyFS
The first solo I learned was the first solo from Master of Puppets (ya know, the interlude). I suck at playing leads, I am a rhythm player at heart, but learning that set me in the right direction to play leads at least decently.

You could try. I didn't found it boring to learn, but I don't know about you obviously.

Sweating Bullets solo (Megadeth) isn't too difficult either.

Thanks for the suggestions. I've never actually heard Sweating Bullets so I have no idea whether or not it would even be do-able. And the MoP interlude doesn't sound too hard, might give it a try.


Quote by monwobobbo
damn dude a little harsh.

cheeseshark learning stuff can be boring, part of the deal. solos taken out of the context of a song can sound rather boring as well. keep in mind that people often will remember the melody line to a song or the main riff. guitar players are often the only ones that really care about the solos.

now can you actually play the first solo or do you just know the notes (there is a diffeence.) that solo is very melodic and has some nice dynamics to it. that is a big part of playing any solo piece. just spitting notes gets old fast.


I'm not saying Sanitarium was in no way entertaining at all, just not really challenging. Part of my boredom might have to do with the fact that I honestly don't love that song. It's a good song, I would just never call it a favorite.

I know what you mean regarding learning the notes vs. playing the solo. I would say I can play the solo fine, it sounds fine to me at least.
#8
ok what are you doing in prepartation for playing any of these solos. if you are planning on them 5-7 moths down the road (which wasn't made clear to begin with) what steps are you taking to put you in a position to do this?
#9
Cheeseshark, I don't know how you train solos, but I divide them by several parts and practice one by one until I can play them at 110% speed. I start slow, a bit slower than the speed I'm most comfortable with when I start out (say, I can play a part of the solo at 50% speed, I play it for a bit at 40% and 45% before going up).

I also practice them in the clean setting of my amp so distortion doesn't hides my mistakes.

I don't know if there is a faster method or something like that, but it works very well for me.

Quote by monwobobbo

now can you actually play the first solo or do you just know the notes (there is a diffeence.) that solo is very melodic and has some nice dynamics to it. that is a big part of playing any solo piece. just spitting notes gets old fast.


This is also very important, I totally agree with this. But that obviously can't be taught, you must "learn" that by yourself.
Last edited by DanyFS at May 17, 2015,
#10
Quote by monwobobbo
ok what are you doing in prepartation for playing any of these solos. if you are planning on them 5-7 moths down the road (which wasn't made clear to begin with) what steps are you taking to put you in a position to do this?

Looking back at my original post, I really could have made it more clear what I was trying to say. Sorry about that.

To be honest I have no idea what to do to improve at playing leads besides playing leads that are at my level and maybe practicing scales. If you have some recommendations for practice I would really appreciate it.


Quote by DanyFS
Cheeseshark, I don't know how you train solos, but I divide them by several parts and practice one by one until I can play them at 110% speed. I start slow, a bit slower than the speed I'm most comfortable with when I start out (say, I can play a part of the solo at 50% speed, I play it for a bit at 40% and 45% before going up).

I also practice them in the clean setting of my amp so distortion doesn't hides my mistakes.

I don't know if there is a faster method or something like that, but it works very well for me.


This is also very important, I totally agree with this. But that obviously can't be taught, you must "learn" that by yourself.

I usually take it fairly slowly, though I do like your idea of practicing sections of it. I should probably do that. Thanks.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at May 17, 2015,
#11
Try recording yourself. Believe it or not, when you're starting out (or even when you've been playing for a while), you tend sound worse recorded than listening to yourself play live. So try that out and if you don't sound as good as you want, then you have a new goal of not just learning songs but also making what you can already play sound better.
#12
Quote by Arron_Zacx
Try recording yourself. Believe it or not, when you're starting out (or even when you've been playing for a while), you tend sound worse recorded than listening to yourself play live. So try that out and if you don't sound as good as you want, then you have a new goal of not just learning songs but also making what you can already play sound better.

Have any of you ever recorded your voice and been surprised at the sound of your own voice?I tried just messing around and playing some riffs for a bit, and I take back what I said about being able to play the solo well.

It sounds as stiff as if I had just learned it. When I play it, it becomes anything but melodic. I have never before felt like a worse player than at this moment. It is sort of a good thing, I can at least hear how my playing actually sounds to other people and practice it until it sounds good recorded. So thanks a ton for that advice!
Last edited by Cheeseshark at May 17, 2015,
#13
Recording myself for the first time was a very big wake up call. Many beginners (including myself) are very naive and that first recording is usually a big shock. I remember not understanding why I sounded so awful, and I thought initially it might have been my bad gear, but soon realized that I was not as good as I thought.
#14
Quote by Cheeseshark
Have any of you ever recorded your voice and been surprised at the sound of your own voice?I tried just messing around and playing some riffs for a bit, and I take back what I said about being able to play the solo well.

It sounds as stiff as if I had just learned it. When I play it, it becomes anything but melodic. I have never before felt like a worse player than at this moment. It is sort of a good thing, I can at least hear how my playing actually sounds to other people and practice it until it sounds good recorded. So thanks a ton for that advice!


See the positives:

1. You made the decision to record yourself which is a great idea (although a bit of a shock as you noticed).
2. You can hear the mistakes so your ear must be working at least a little.
3. You can recognise what you need to work on.

If you have been practicing for a year then I'm sure you did sound worse a while back. Keep hold of that recording and play it back in a few months to monitor your improvement.
#15
Quote by Arron_Zacx
Try recording yourself. Believe it or not, when you're starting out (or even when you've been playing for a while), you tend sound worse recorded than listening to yourself play live. So try that out and if you don't sound as good as you want, then you have a new goal of not just learning songs but also making what you can already play sound better.


This is so true, I forgot to mention this! Again, Master of Puppets interlude. I thought: "Hey, I can play the first part of it quite well, going to record it to see how it sounds".

The result? I sounded sloppy as hell. It was a big shock. I knew that I wasn't very good at playing leads as mentioned, but since I had learned my first lead decently (or at least I thought), I realized that I was a bit worse than I thought.

But it was good I recorded it. If I didn't, I wouldn't be aware of my sloppy lead playing and I'm getting better now.
#16
Quote by Cheeseshark
Have any of you ever recorded your voice and been surprised at the sound of your own voice?I tried just messing around and playing some riffs for a bit, and I take back what I said about being able to play the solo well.

It sounds as stiff as if I had just learned it. When I play it, it becomes anything but melodic. I have never before felt like a worse player than at this moment. It is sort of a good thing, I can at least hear how my playing actually sounds to other people and practice it until it sounds good recorded. So thanks a ton for that advice!


don't be so hard on yourself. you're still a beginner and you just can't expect that much so soon.

the first time i heard a tape of myself was certainly an eye opener. some wasn't to bad and much was. in time you'll be in a better position to judge yourself. i know when it's crap these days. the one positive is that what you consider to be crap will get better .

side note on recording yourself . if you think it's bad at home try going to a recording studio for the first time. that 'awesome" tone you think you have ...... crap. at band volumes every mistake really shows through. learned a lot that day.
#18
Quote by Cheeseshark
Looking back at my original post, I really could have made it more clear what I was trying to say. Sorry about that.

To be honest I have no idea what to do to improve at playing leads besides playing leads that are at my level and maybe practicing scales. If you have some recommendations for practice I would really appreciate it.
.


one of the things my guitar teacher did was to find solos that were made from specific scales. then i could learn the scale and have a demonstration of its use.

if you really want to learn how to solo then start doing your own. once again take a specific scale and use to to do a solo. perhaps record a simple rhythm guitar track to play over and put totgether a solo. i built my song Curse Of The Mummy's Tomb (found in link in profile) around this idea. i wanted a middle eastern sound and ended up using the hungarian minor scale (ritchie blackmore uses this). once you actually start turning those scales into solos you'll be suprised on what you hit on. after a while you will start to hear what is going on and be able to play it without tabs.
#19
You should try the solos of these song-
Nothing Else Matters(Metallica)
Don't Cry(GN'R)
Enter sandman(Metallica)
Californication(RHCP)
Back in Black(AC/DC)
Mama I coming home(Ozzy)
Paradise City(GN'R)
Paranoid(Black Sabbath)
Wind of Change(Scorpions)
#20
Quote by Cheeseshark


Also I know this is kinda subjective, but If someone could tell me how difficult the solos from Blackened and Master of Puppets are it would be much appreciated. Pretty much just whether or not one of those is a reasonable for the next 5-7 months. I wanna set some kind of attainable goal.

Thanks.


The slow solo section in Master of Puppets is easy. The fast solo is much easier than it sounds. You should be able to pull it off in 5 months.
#21
Other recommendations for easier solos:

Orion
Iron Maiden - Powerslave, Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, Aces High - all great beginner/medium level solos.
#22
Quote by monwobobbo
one of the things my guitar teacher did was to find solos that were made from specific scales. then i could learn the scale and have a demonstration of its use.

if you really want to learn how to solo then start doing your own. once again take a specific scale and use to to do a solo. perhaps record a simple rhythm guitar track to play over and put totgether a solo. i built my song Curse Of The Mummy's Tomb (found in link in profile) around this idea. i wanted a middle eastern sound and ended up using the hungarian minor scale (ritchie blackmore uses this). once you actually start turning those scales into solos you'll be suprised on what you hit on. after a while you will start to hear what is going on and be able to play it without tabs.

I have no idea where to even begin with writing a solo. I know a few scales but don't know where to go from there. Any resources or advice on this would be greatly appreciated.

Quote by abinash.boruah92
You should try the solos of these song-
Nothing Else Matters(Metallica)
Don't Cry(GN'R)
Enter sandman(Metallica)
Californication(RHCP)
Back in Black(AC/DC)
Mama I coming home(Ozzy)
Paradise City(GN'R)
Paranoid(Black Sabbath)
Wind of Change(Scorpions)

Thanks. I'll give all of these a look.

Quote by reverb66
The slow solo section in Master of Puppets is easy. The fast solo is much easier than it sounds. You should be able to pull it off in 5 months.

Other recommendations for easier solos:

Orion
Iron Maiden - Powerslave, Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, Aces High - all great beginner/medium level sol

Yeah, I've heard people say that the patterns in the main solo aren't exactly complex, it sounds like the speed is what makes it such a daunting task. And thanks for the song recommendations. I'm a bit ashamed to say that I haven't listened to either of those Maiden tracks yet though.
#23
Quote by Cheeseshark
I have no idea where to even begin with writing a solo. I know a few scales but don't know where to go from there. Any resources or advice on this would be greatly appreciated:


well here's the thing there really isn't any, it's something you have to do. scales are the building blocks of solos. start with something simple like a pentatonic scale in the key of E. first position at the 12th fret. plnety of solos over the years have been played there witout even going elsewhere on the neck. of course it's more interesting if you do go elsewhere. if you learn that scale all up and down the neck in each key (well say in E to begin with and perhaps A) then you can start to play solos. pick some note groupings play them add a few bends and slides and before you know it you have a solo. don't worry about it being some great complex thing. many aren't when you really look at them. none of the slos on my tunes are going to give Steve Vai nightmares they're all pretty simple. learning to phrase is the tough part. this means basically making those notes sound like you just playing a scale or random notes. this takes time. you will find that more often than not that with good phrasing that the simpler ideas work best.
#24
Quote by monwobobbo
well here's the thing there really isn't any, it's something you have to do. scales are the building blocks of solos. start with something simple like a pentatonic scale in the key of E. first position at the 12th fret. plnety of solos over the years have been played there witout even going elsewhere on the neck. of course it's more interesting if you do go elsewhere. if you learn that scale all up and down the neck in each key (well say in E to begin with and perhaps A) then you can start to play solos. pick some note groupings play them add a few bends and slides and before you know it you have a solo. don't worry about it being some great complex thing. many aren't when you really look at them. none of the slos on my tunes are going to give Steve Vai nightmares they're all pretty simple. learning to phrase is the tough part. this means basically making those notes sound like you just playing a scale or random notes. this takes time. you will find that more often than not that with good phrasing that the simpler ideas work best.

Right, I assume it will get easier the more I do it as well. Sorry for the late response.

Quote by vayne92
Not gonna happen. You're not being realistic.


I was the one who recommended that, and I actually recommended trying the 4 guitar solo's in that song because they range in difficulty. Sorry buddy, but if Master of Puppets and Blackened are your idea of exciting solo's then you better come to terms with the fact that you will not be playing them any time in the near future.

I forgot to ask, how difficult is the 4th solo? Will I be ready to play it by the time I play the other three, or will it require extra practice?