#1
Hey there! I searched out for a post like this, but only found threads relating to electric guitar, so please forgive me if there is something like this out there, and feel free to direct me to it!

There's this song that I'm trying to learn (Millennia by Crown the Empire Link)
Pretty simple, right? Right. All barre chords (which I have NO problem with). Easy. The only problem I have with learning this song is that darned power chord on the fifth fret that starts on the A string.

Like I said, I can do barre chords all day. But as soon as I attempt power chords, it all goes down hill. I can barely get them to sound, if they sound at all, and my thumb tires out very quickly. I don't really know what the problem is or how I can fix it, but any help would be very appreciated!

Thanks!
OAS AAS LLS!

Classically trained flutist; Intermediate guitarist; Hopeful vocalist

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#2
It was always my impression that so-called "power chords" are simplified chord structures that allow rhythm playing on an electric at high volumes without dealing with the overtones/feedback from "full"chords.

So....Not really intended for acoustics.... You might try finding one of those sites that show a wide variety of inversions and just keep trying variations of the chord listed until you find one that works.
#3
Well, if chords aren't sounding in the center of the neck in general, there likely isn't enough "relief", in the neck.

If it's a simple matter of insufficient volume, what the heck did you expect? The overall volume of an acoustics drops as you go up the neck. In this case, you're expecting a two note chord, to be as loud, or louder, than the guitar is natively, strumming open chords.

If that's the case, I'd start looking for an A/E guitar with stereo electronics, and use a volume pedal to push gain into a second channel, when it's time for the power chord theatrics.

You can check out proper set-up procedure for an acoustic here: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Neck, "relief" (and hence truss rod adjustment) is covered on pg. 5.

Just don't do anything stupid with the truss rod. The action won't ever be as good as a decent electric, and all you'll get is buzz when you try to play your guitar.
#4
Quote by Bikewer
It was always my impression that so-called "power chords" are simplified chord structures that allow rhythm playing on an electric at high volumes without dealing with the overtones/feedback from "full"chords.

So....Not really intended for acoustics.... You might try finding one of those sites that show a wide variety of inversions and just keep trying variations of the chord listed until you find one that works.
A "power chord" is a 1st & 5th (no 3rd). You'll see them notated "C5". It isn't actually a "chord" per se, as you do need a 3rd to establish whether a chord is major or minor.

The issue the TS is complaining about is commonly pops up when you're trying to play something like The Who's, "Behind Blue Eyes". Although the chords in the bridge are full chords, they have no bite on an acoustic. See my post above for more explanation.

You need a stereo guitar, and an amp's 2nd channel pushed into a bit of "crunch", to get the effect I think TS is looking for. (Or maybe, "wants to hear", would be more accurate).