#1
Ok say i had a chord progression of G, F#, E, D. Could I arpeggiate a Gsus4 chord over the G chord? I understand that suspended chords build tension to resolve to its major counterpart, but would arpeggiating it over the major chord work?
#3
only you can answer that...how does it sound/do you like it..?? if you like it then yes...any two chords could work together..depending on the context (voice leading etc) the chord names do not have to describe the chord..the function of the chord may be ambiguous..so naming it may not even be necessary..its the total context of how the chords work together..play with the voices in the chords one at a time and see if they make melodic sense..that is one way to determine chord function and its name
play well

wolf
#4
Quote by Elintasokas
Not really. Better change the third to a fourth in the major chord. Otherwise you have a minor 2nd dissonance between the 3rd (B) and 4th (C) of the G chord.

Are you saying i should change the third in the G major to a fourth? Wouldn't that make the G major chord a Gsus4? I want to arpeggiate something over the G major to create some type of nice sound. Maybe a Gsus2 would work? Would the A and B clash together badly?
Last edited by J23L at May 20, 2015,
#5
^If You want to be harmonically clear, then avoid the dissonance between the 3rd and 4th of the chord.

If there were A and B, it wouldn't be Gsus2, would it? It'd be Gadd9. (Or add2, I know Tonto's watching...waiting...)

That'll work. Use your ears.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Quote by Jet Penguin
^If You want to be harmonically clear, then avoid the dissonance between the 3rd and 4th of the chord.

If there were A and B, it wouldn't be Gsus2, would it? It'd be Gadd9. (Or add2, I know Tonto's watching...waiting...)

That'll work. Use your ears.

No, I was asking if the A in the Gsus2 would sound bad against the B in the G major. I know that there is no B in the Gsus2
#7
Quote by J23L
Ok say i had a chord progression of G, F#, E, D. Could I arpeggiate a Gsus4 chord over the G chord? I understand that suspended chords build tension to resolve to its major counterpart, but would arpeggiating it over the major chord work?


No.

If you lay on a Gsus chord (play it as a static chord) for an extended duration, then it starts to sound like a C5/2 (or, "Csus2" as some folks like to call it) chord.

Your ear tends to hear it as a C chord rather than a G chord.
"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#8
Quote by Elintasokas
Not really. Better change the third to a fourth in the major chord. Otherwise you have a minor 2nd dissonance between the 3rd (B) and 4th (C) of the G chord.

I know very little about theory, but I want to create tension so would that dissonance help to achieve this? I don't need it to be completely harmonious, I just want to build suspense
#9
What Tonto said. Don't confuse dissonance with harmonic blurriness.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
Quote by Elintasokas
In that case it'd be just "2"


Yes!

You remembered.
"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#12
Quote by J23L
I know very little about theory, but I want to create tension so would that dissonance help to achieve this? I don't need it to be completely harmonious, I just want to build suspense


The chord progression you gave us (G, F#, E, D) already has tension "built in" insofar as it's an exercise in chromatic harmony.
"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#15
Quote by Tonto Goldstien
The chord progression you gave us (G, F#, E, D) already has tension "built in" insofar as it's an exercise in chromatic harmony.

I know that, but im trying to add more tension. Im practicing layering guitar parts and I can't find anything to go over the chords. It seems like something always clashes with something
#16
Take a look at the actual voicings that are being created. You can do anything if you voice it well. Try placing overly-clashing tones in different octaves.
#17
Quote by Harmosis
Take a look at the actual voicings that are being created. You can do anything if you voice it well. Try placing overly-clashing tones in different octaves.

Yep, and close intervals in a higher register. The overtone series is a good guide.
#18
^Exactly. Everything's fair game.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp