#1
So I'm going through The Guitar Grimoire Exercise Book by Adam Kaomon. Pretty much the first thing it gets into is the 7 positions of 3-note per string major scales, and economy picking them all the way up and down the neck. I feel dumb that after years of playing I still need to stare at the book to do this properly, at least in most keys, but sadly I do. Problem is, the book keeps closing on me, and if I can find a way to keep it open, all the pictures, text, tab, and notation are small and if it's not on a stand it's on my lap, forcing me into terrible posture, worsening my already super crappy neck and back problems. So I'm looling for a poster that depicts the major scale in 7 individual boxes, in 3-note per string style, so I can hang it on my wall and comfortably practice playing these up and down the neck in any key each morning upon waking. It would also be fantastic if it had extras, like the harmonic or melodic minor scales broken into positions, or diminished or whole tone or even just pentatonic scales. The thing I think I like most about this style is that each different position, if you consider the first note the "1" of the scale, is a different mode. For example the 2nd position is Dorian. It's pretty convenient to see it alk layed out in front of me like that.

So I was wondering if anyone here has come across a poster like this and could send me a link to where to buy one? I'm looking on amazon but so far no luck.
Last edited by justin.carter43 at May 21, 2015,
#2
I don't think this would quite be the right forum for that, but that's not important right now.

The reason that you can't remember the positions is because you've been relying on the book too much. A poster will probably just worsen the problem so you can't play them at all without a diagram in front of you. I suggest you take some time to learn the notes of the fretboard, as well as the scale intervals. That will help you much more than a poster will. Plus you won't have to crutch on anything but your own knowledge.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#3
I have one of those cheap ($15-$20) music stands that folds up like an umbrella. It has little wire things that hold books open. It works like a champ, I've had the same one for over 10 years.
#4
Quote by Junior#1
I don't think this would quite be the right forum for that, but that's not important right now.

The reason that you can't remember the positions is because you've been relying on the book too much. A poster will probably just worsen the problem so you can't play them at all without a diagram in front of you. I suggest you take some time to learn the notes of the fretboard, as well as the scale intervals. That will help you much more than a poster will. Plus you won't have to crutch on anything but your own knowledge.

You may very well be right but I'd like to give more background to the situation and see if you still think so.

All the way up the neckd of my guitars, I can always comfortably play and inprovise in the keys of C, G, D,A, E, and F. I'm reasonably comfortable with B and G# as well, but the difference Iis with those other keys, I can sing the melodies that I play as I inprovise them, always knowing exactly what the next note will sound like no matter what it is, sometimes even making great interval leaps. Even the occasional chromaticism doesn't throw me off.

But the rest of the keys...not so much. I can find arpeggios in them and work out the scale from there but I can't easily run very far on the neck.

Also I've been trying to improve my speed. Exercising economy picking these 3-note per string scale shapes is for the purpose of accomplishing these goals:

Improving technique/dexterity
Improving speed
Familiarizing myself with all keys aalll the way up the neck

I'm really just trying to do these exercises every morning. Not at all as my main practice routine, which mostly consists of songs and improvisation, but just as a way to get my day started with a healthy dose of mindless guitar.