#1
Hi everyone.

I've always been struggling with barre chords, mostly the E major and E minor shaped ones, and I've always found ways to cheat or avoid playing them (playing them with the thumb over the neck or moving my index finger so that it's not pressing the strings that are already fretted by other fingers in front of it). But now, I'm finally learning to do a full barre with my index finger. My objective is to have all six strings ring out. I'm really close to doing it, but the B string falls right under a crease on my finger so it's either not ringing out or buzzing a little.

I'm learning on an electric and I have another issue: I have to press really hard for the B string to ring out, so much that the G string (and to a lesser extent the high E string) is bent out of tune. I can see it when I plug into a tuner, it's slightly sharp. As I said, I play on an electric so the G string is not wound and can be easily bent out of tune if you don't have a light touch.
Of course, the guitar is properly intonated and the nut slots are cut deep enough. A guitar tech checked it recently. I can't blame it on the gear. I use 10-52s, by the way.
I tried moving my finger a little so that the crease falls under the G string. It's barely ringing but at least it's in tune. But now the high E string is slightly sharp!

What can I do, besides switching to a wound G and say goodbye to bending on this string? I'm actually wondering if barre chords can ever be perfectly in tune on an electric guitar because of that f****** unwound G string. I'm asking this to the guys who have mastered the mystical arts of the barre chords: if you play one into a tuner, is it REALLY in tune?

Thanks!
#2
It takes time to learn these turn your barring finger slightly to the side,
There are tons of u tube videos
#3
Keep trying. Your fingers will get stronger and more dextrous. Maybe get a second opinion on the setup, just to be sure. Not saying he did it wrong or anything, but something may have gotten overlooked.
And who says you can't bend a wound string? I do it all the time.
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#4
nature has a way to reshape your hands..so ted greene has said on several occasions..very wide interval stretches and using middle and upper parts of the finger to hold down more than one note are possible..with determination and practice..

the barre chord has a bad rap as being difficult to play..for major chords when analyzed though the first finger is only holding down 3 strings Bass E B String and high E string for minor barre chords add the G string..lets isolate the notes the first finger has to use..

the thumb location on back of neck is important..try the middle of the neck and with the tension/relax exercises to follow..don't forget to relax the thumb also..!!

lets adapt a mind set..YOU CAN do this! one of the main problems is not relaxing the hand after you play the chord..lets do this very slowly..we are not going to strum the chord..just form the barre chord for Gmajor..just rest your fingers on top of the strings..don't depress them..now just depress them for one second and release the tension but keep your fingers on the strings..do this ohh..three times in a slow count - then take you hand off the guitar and stretch your fingers wide and relax-hand and wrist..now form a minor barre chord..repeat exercise..now add pressure on strings and strum chord once..relax tension but keep fingers on strings..do this 3 times..now repeat all the exercises...then do the same with the minor barre..

now just use your first finger and thumb for support to barre the fret.."bounce" on the strings with the pressure/relax thing .. at some point you will note that ALL strings ring true..now depress the strings and play the low E G B and high E string one note at a time..relax..bounce on the strings..apply pressure play the notes again..now full barre..do the same exercise..relax and stretch you fingers and relax after each exercise...hope most of this is clear..

do this for a week..see if this improves your playing --

hope this helps
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at May 21, 2015,
#5
Quote by wolflen
nature has a way to reshape your hands..so ted greene has said on several occasions..very wide interval stretches and using middle and upper parts of the finger to hold down more than one note are possible..with determination and practice..

the barre chord has a bad rap as being difficult to play..for major chords when analyzed though the first finger is only holding down 3 strings Bass E B String and high E string for minor barre chords add the G string..lets isolate the notes the first finger has to use..

the thumb location on back of neck is important..try the middle of the neck and with the tension/relax exercises to follow..don't forget to relax the thumb also..!!

lets adapt a mind set..YOU CAN do this! one of the main problems is not relaxing the hand after you play the chord..lets do this very slowly..we are not going to strum the chord..just form the barre chord for Gmajor..just rest your fingers on top of the strings..don't depress them..now just depress them for one second and release the tension but keep your fingers on the strings..do this ohh..three times in a slow count - then take you hand off the guitar and stretch your fingers wide and relax-hand and wrist..now form a minor barre chord..repeat exercise..now add pressure on strings and strum chord once..relax tension but keep fingers on strings..do this 3 times..now repeat all the exercises...then do the same with the minor barre..

now just use your first finger and thumb for support to barre the fret.."bounce" on the strings with the pressure/relax thing .. at some point you will note that ALL strings ring true..now depress the strings and play the low E G B and high E string one note at a time..relax..bounce on the strings..apply pressure play the notes again..now full barre..do the same exercise..relax and stretch you fingers and relax after each exercise...hope most of this is clear..

do this for a week..see if this improves your playing --

hope this helps

Wow this is great advice I will follow this myself
#6
!

What can I do, besides switching to a wound G and say goodbye to bending on this string? I'm actually wondering if barre chords can ever be perfectly in tune on an electric guitar because of that f****** unwound G string. I'm asking this to the guys who have mastered the mystical arts of the barre chords: if you play one into a tuner, is it REALLY in tune?

Thanks!

Issue I did not address in my other post...when you check the note in the tuner..are you holding the entire chord or just pressing one finger on the note...makes a big difference..if you holding the entire chord the string may be picking up overtones for the other strings thus the sharp/flat report you are getting..if the tone rings true by itself..then don't worry about it..when you play a chord there are overtones of each note in the chord that can be picked up by a tuner.
play well

wolf
#7
Chords on the guitar can technically never be in tune, even on a perfectly intonated guitar that's been precisely tuned. They just get close enough for rock n roll. (The frets are placed at what is just approximations, and those approximations comes from the compromise that is equal temperament which assumes all notes are separated by the same interval, where in reality they are not.)

There are attempts at making chords sound sweeter, namely the True Temperament Fretting System used by Steve Vai, IA Eklundh etc. Looks like this:



Personally, I rarely play barre chords on the electric since I most of the time use a lot of distortion. But as for playing them perfectly, I've never had more of a pitch issue than with open chords, my problem has rather been getting all the strings to ring out correctly. It's easy to miss the high E with the index, I find...
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#8
If it's any help, with my skinny fingers I have the same issue with the B string. To resolve this I moved my index finger upwards (towards the ceiling) and roll it slightly to the left. Shouldn't require much pressure at all. As easy as an open chord.
#9
Quote by gweddle.nz
If it's any help, with my skinny fingers I have the same issue with the B string. To resolve this I moved my index finger upwards (towards the ceiling) and roll it slightly to the left. Shouldn't require much pressure at all. As easy as an open chord.


This along with what was posted about applying too much pressure are very good tips. I actually started doing this myself. It's easy to apply too much pressure to the low E (6th string), at least for me, after playing acoustic. You have to learn to apply the right amount, plus your hand will thank you later . As long as all of the notes ring out, that's your ticket.
#10
Quote by HomerSGR
Chords on the guitar can technically never be in tune, even on a perfectly intonated guitar that's been precisely tuned. They just get close enough for rock n roll. (The frets are placed at what is just approximations, and those approximations comes from the compromise that is equal temperament which assumes all notes are separated by the same interval, where in reality they are not.)

There are attempts at making chords sound sweeter, namely the True Temperament Fretting System used by Steve Vai, IA Eklundh etc. Looks like this:

.


I wondered what the deal was with the squirrley looking frets. Interesting, but I imagine an expensive upgrade.