#1
Hey!

If you've listened to Slash you might know Anastasia and we will roam. Any idea in which key these songs might be? For example in Anastasia, the part following the acoustic intro sounds good but I wonder what the scale/key might be. Also in "We will roam" the riff changes a bit before the chorus and makes a rather "unnatural" descend starting from Bbm to Gbm (if I remember correctly). In what key/scale is this possible..?
Last edited by Billie_J at May 22, 2015,
#2
Music isn't scales, and a key is just a point of resolution. You can use any note you wish in a key. If you want to play over it target chord tones and use your ear for embellishments.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at May 22, 2015,
#3
To figure out the key, you need to use your ears. Figuring out the chords also helps. Try to find the home chord (by listening). That's your key. Remember that it doesn't necessarily stay the same throughout the song.

Remember that not all chords fit your key signature. That doesn't necessarily mean there's a key change. Non-diatonic chords are really usual. Most of the time they are borrowed from the parallel key (for example if you are in D major, you can borrow chords from D minor and vice versa). Another common non-diatonic chord type is secondary dominant.

Let's say we are in the key of C. You can basically have a secondary dominant for any scale degree in C major (though secondary dominants for the 7th scale degree in a major key aren't really used). It's always a major or a dominant 7th chord a perfect fifth above the chord. For example if our chord progression was C F G C, you could color it with secondary dominants. Secondary dominant for F is C7. Secondary dominant for G is D7. And secondary dominant for C is G7, but in the key of C it's not a secondary dominant, it's simply the dominant chord of the key. "Secondary dominant" refers to a non-diatonic chord. Our chord progression would become C C7 F D7 G G7 C.

But before learning about non-diatonic chords, learn about the chord functions in major and keys. Also learn to recognize them by ear. So ignore what I wrote about secondary dominants if it feels too hard to understand now. First learn about diatonic chord functions, and after you understand them, non-diatonic chords may not feel that strange any more.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 22, 2015,
#5
^ Not a good idea. If you just use a site for that, you'll never learn to do it yourself. Also, I wouldn't trust any random website. I would rather trust my ears.

It's not rocket science. Just learn to do it yourself.


I tried it with Stevie Wonder's "Smile Please", and the site says it's in A major/Db minor. And it's not in either - it's in E major. It may work for songs that have simple chords, but that song uses non-diatonic chords and modulation (and a lot of the chords are 7th chords, not just basic triads). None of the parts in the song are in A major or Db minor. Also, Db minor doesn't even exist (or technically it does, but it would make no sense to use that as your key signature - it would have 8 flats in it. C# minor with 4 sharps would make a lot more sense).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
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