#1
Right, apologies in advance for the n00bness of these questions. I can play guitar but want to learn bass. If I take to it it may be my main instrument.

I have small hands and am female, I usually play guitars with slim ish necks should I be looking at short scale basses or might this limit my playing in the future. I have tried to research but opinions seem very mixed! I was looking at the squier jaguar SS basses and they did feel more manageable and guitar like but should I just accept its going to feel different because its a different instrument?

The other bass I have been looking at is the Sterling Subray 4 is this suitable for a beginner? I liked the one I played in the shop.

Any help of advice appreciated
#2
Quote by nerdofprey
Right, apologies in advance for the n00bness of these questions. I can play guitar but want to learn bass. If I take to it it may be my main instrument.

I have small hands and am female, I usually play guitars with slim ish necks should I be looking at short scale basses or might this limit my playing in the future. I have tried to research but opinions seem very mixed! I was looking at the squier jaguar SS basses and they did feel more manageable and guitar like but should I just accept its going to feel different because its a different instrument?

The other bass I have been looking at is the Sterling Subray 4 is this suitable for a beginner? I liked the one I played in the shop.

Any help of advice appreciated


Welcome to bass world!

Personally, I'd stick with a standard scale bass because your hands do get used to it and you'll feel comfortable with more basses.

In terms of basses with slim necks, the SUB Ray4 is really comfortable and so are the Ibanez SR Basses (something like an SR370 is the same kinda price range). I've owned both and they're really good. Squier Jazz basses like the Vintage Modified or Classic Vibe are also good for the money.

Just go around a shop and try as many as possible until you find 'the one'
Good luck!
Last edited by CorrosionMedia at May 23, 2015,
#3
Thanks for the reply! Think I will stick with standard scale then.

I have been to the shop but because its so different to guitar I feel out of my depth! The sterling subray 4 appeals because I really like the neck on musicman type guitars and I have read some great reviews. I also really like the look of the squier vintage modified jaguar special too, that's full scale I think but I am a bit prejudiced against Squier as a brand...
#5
i'm 5' 3" with small hands (also female), and i played short scale till i was injured. now i have a jag ss, which i really like, but i'm hoping to get back to 34" scale asap! i had a SUB ray 4 briefly, and i really liked it. the one i had was good quality, really nice tone, felt great to play. however i found it was heavy and started having pain in my shoulders so i returned it.

btw, squier makes some very nice lower priced basses as does ibanez. any brand has a few lemons, and with lower cost instruments you may find small issues in the paint and such, but those are the two brands that deliver the best quality for the buck, and often better than expected sound, as well.
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#6
You get used to the larger neck feel of a bass in time. It's just like going from an Ibanez wizard neck to a Gibson 50's profile neck - you adapt. A jazz style bass might be more comfortable for your hands as they narrow a bit toward the nut. I've heard the Geddy Lee sig bass has a narrow/slim neck.

Another option would be to go with a Fender/Squier Bass VI - if you want to be a rebel of sorts.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#7
Thanks for your help! Still browsing around, I quite like the look of the Eva Gardner Squier sig and some of the yamaha bb series! I think I am overcomplicating this and should maybe just buy a starcaster and get on with it!!!!!
#8
It isn't the least expensive, by far; but the bass with one of the slimmest, easiest-to-play necks that is also an outstanding bass is the original Fender Geddy Lee Signature Jazz. Not the new American version, which has a thicker neck, but the MIJ version. There really is no downside to that one if you like a slim, fast neck on a bass.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#9
The width on the Jazz type instruments has been about the narrowest you will come across in Basses. Never was my cup of tea.

Although my 6's look like Super Carrier Flight decks, they are thin thin thin. You might want to play an Ibanez 450, if you can find one just to see how the MM's are very battish in comparison to a true fast neck.

I would place my suggestion with the others directing you to the Jazz types.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#11
Most small-hands female-type bass players I know have adapted to standard length basses. One commandeered my Carvin five-string, damn her! She sort of prefers the trade-off of slightly wider neck to having to go down to where the frets are wide apart on some of her bass runs. And her short fingers are stinky fast picking.
#12
Thanks for your help! I am now the proud owner of a bass and an amp and am happy with my choices!

I was very tempted by the squier dimension delux bass but I ended up living dangeroulsy getting used stuff off ebay! I got a 1980s MIJ Ibanez Blazer type bass thing (It isn't Ibanez but was made in the same factory or something and looks the same shape!) and an ampeg BA112 amp.

The sounds I'm getting sound good to my noob ears and I love the basses maple neck that has that nice aged look (Some new maple necks are too pale for my taste). And it cost less than the Squier in the end!

I'm working through the Stu Clayton Bass crash course book so far so good!