#1
So here's the thing. I have a Les Paul, which I've owned for nearly a year, and I pretty much "know" the guitar (where to pick, how to pick, where to place my hand, etc.). When I go to my guitar teacher's place, I have to play a Strat, and it feels really awkward. My pick sometimes hits the middle pickup, volume knob gets in the way of the right hand, and therefore I have to place it in a ridiculously awkward angle, and on that guitar I can't perform some technical exercises as well as on my guitar. The fact that my teacher has 11s on it (standard tuning) doesn't help either (I also use 11s, but tuned down a half step). How can I get used to the Strat? I have to mention that it is doubly important for me, since I plan to own a Strat of my own in the near future. Input from players who own both types of guitars is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

P.S. The irony is that a Les Paul felt awkward and a Strat comfortable when I first started playing electric guitar...
Yamaha F310P "Bella"
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Goldtop "Chrysa"
Fender Standard Stratocaster "Michelle"
Fender Classic Series 70s Stratocaster "Nefertiti"

Marshall DSL15C
BIAS FX & AMP
Line 6 POD X3

Dunlop Stubby 3.0mm picks
D'Addario strings
#2
Quote by CostasNoir
So here's the thing. I have a Les Paul, which I've owned for nearly a year, and I pretty much "know" the guitar (where to pick, how to pick, where to place my hand, etc.). When I go to my guitar teacher's place, I have to play a Strat, and it feels really awkward. My pick sometimes hits the middle pickup, volume knob gets in the way of the right hand, and therefore I have to place it in a ridiculously awkward angle, and on that guitar I can't perform some technical exercises as well as on my guitar. The fact that my teacher has 11s on it (standard tuning) doesn't help either (I also use 11s, but tuned down a half step). How can I get used to the Strat? I have to mention that it is doubly important for me, since I plan to own a Strat of my own in the near future. Input from players who own both types of guitars is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

P.S. The irony is that a Les Paul felt awkward and a Strat comfortable when I first started playing electric guitar...


all about getting used to the guitar. you will have to deal with a different hand position when going from one to the other. most rest their hand on the bridge of a LP (or other tune-o-matic style bridge guitars). since the strat has a flat surface you have to adjust your hand to work with that. i'd adjust my strumming some when using a strat. try picking a little behind or a little forward of the middle pickup. this will change the tone a little (which can come in handy) and avoid hitting the pup. try not usuing so much of the pick as well. this does take a little time to adjust to. when i go back and forth between my Eagle/SG and my strats it takes a few minutes to really adjust sometimes. after a while though making that adjustment should get easier. if playing a show i try to play both styles before to warm up.

not much you can do about the strings. your LP has a shorter scale which makes bending a little easier to begin with. add on the 1/2step tighter tuned strings and that can make it tough to play.
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
all about getting used to the guitar. you will have to deal with a different hand position when going from one to the other. most rest their hand on the bridge of a LP (or other tune-o-matic style bridge guitars). since the strat has a flat surface you have to adjust your hand to work with that. i'd adjust my strumming some when using a strat. try picking a little behind or a little forward of the middle pickup. this will change the tone a little (which can come in handy) and avoid hitting the pup. try not usuing so much of the pick as well. this does take a little time to adjust to. when i go back and forth between my Eagle/SG and my strats it takes a few minutes to really adjust sometimes. after a while though making that adjustment should get easier. if playing a show i try to play both styles before to warm up.

not much you can do about the strings. your LP has a shorter scale which makes bending a little easier to begin with. add on the 1/2step tighter tuned strings and that can make it tough to play.


I rest my hand on the bridge, like you said. I've seen videos of Malmsteen and he has his right hand pinky a bit extended. I think using a Jazz 3 instead of my usual Tortex T3 will help. Any thoughts on those?
Yamaha F310P "Bella"
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Goldtop "Chrysa"
Fender Standard Stratocaster "Michelle"
Fender Classic Series 70s Stratocaster "Nefertiti"

Marshall DSL15C
BIAS FX & AMP
Line 6 POD X3

Dunlop Stubby 3.0mm picks
D'Addario strings
#4
Take your guitar with you. If you spend your lesson time focusing on how you are playing rather than what you are playing, you are wasting your money on those lessons.
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
#5
Quote by CostasNoir
I rest my hand on the bridge, like you said. I've seen videos of Malmsteen and he has his right hand pinky a bit extended. I think using a Jazz 3 instead of my usual Tortex T3 will help. Any thoughts on those?


well it's really more about how muchof the pick you are using vs the size of the tip. i use dunlop nylon 1mm and occasionally 2-3 mm as well. i just use a minimum of pick when playing single note lines. i don't play much in the line of acoustic style strumming. when i do its a vary narrow strum so i don't hit the volume knob but once again moving your hand to avoid this works best.

while i agree that bringing your won guitar may be benificial for concentration while there it isn't really a detrimate either. being able to go from one guitar to another is a good skill to learn. no you may not be able to play your best on a guitar you aren't familiar with but you don't want to be unable to play any guitar but your own either. when you start playing in bands or jams you might not always have your guitar (or something happens and you have to use some one elses).
#6
This year I have spend 2 decades with the same Stratocaster and getting used to it took time indeed.

It is all about getting used to it and play it all the time until it is a natural habit to do so.

Playing it standing up or sitting down to a metronome will make your hands go in sync naturally and you have to just adjust how to hold the pick the way that works best for you.

I also rest my hand on the bridge and it works fine.