#1
Subject says it all, pretty much. I've been playing 9 months, self taught basically. When I strum with capo, I hear the strings rattling around a lot more than they do otherwise. Sounds like shit sometimes. Is this common? Is there a problem with the way I'm strumming? And why would capo exacerbate this? Thanks

Edit: in case your wondering, I don't have too bad of a guitar. Takamine... about $300. (I'm living in Asia)
Last edited by panman36 at May 25, 2015,
#2
This is common in bad quality capo's, but it can also happen if you don't have the capo on correctly.

What kind of capo do you have?

Perhaps take a picture of the capo when it's on your guitar so we can be sure it's on properly?
#3
Not able to post a pic, but sure I have it on right. You got me thinking about whether this is a lousy capo. It also doesn't sound quite as full or feel as comfortable when I use capo either These things aren't normal then?
#4
Generally the rattling / buzzing sound is a result of a poor capo. My first capo that I got with a guitar magazine was shitty and did this. Got a proper capo after and never had the problem again.
What kind of capo is it? Did you buy it at a music store? Surely you must know a little bit about the capo?

No chords sound as full as an open chord right at the top nut of the guitar. One reason why open chords are the most common chords you'll ever hear. I'm no expert on capo's though. I don't use them all that much, but I like to think I know just enough
#5
You don't have a capo for a classical or Spanish guitar on your acoustic guitar do you? or the other way round. Capo for flat fretboards are not compatible with rounded fretboards and vice-versa.

Position the capo just behind the fret and with just enough pressure to stop the strings rattling.

It may be possible that your frets need dressing or you have a lose one. Sometimes this is only evident when a capo is used.
To check watch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt0P4U5XYx8
#6
What kind of capo is it, and what fret positions do you notice it on?

I'm thinking it might not be a capo problem. It could be too little neck relief or uneven frets, so that the strings are hitting the frets when capoed. If you have only been playing for nine months, you might not have noticed the rattle if you aren't playing the higher frets.
#7
I would say your strings are hitting frets with the capo on due to the lowered action.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
I'm thinking it might not be a capo problem. It could be too little neck relief or uneven frets, so that the strings are hitting the frets when capoed.


+1.

I assume your 'rattle' is the strings rattling on the fret wires.
#9
Quote by PSimonR


Position the capo just behind the fret and with just enough pressure to stop the strings rattling.


Oh, is this important? I was placing it in the middle of the fret, because I feel it gets in the way sometimes. I took your advice and i notice some improvement

P.S. I cannot adjust the pressure on my capo
Last edited by panman36 at May 26, 2015,
#10
Quote by panman36
Oh, is this important? I was placing it in the middle of the fret, because I feel it gets in the way sometimes. I took your advice and i notice some improvement

P.S. I cannot adjust the pressure on my capo


Yep the closer it is to the fret the less you will have this problem, and ideally not have it at all. The same thing is true for fretting notes with your fingers actually. As for it getting in the way, that's just going to happen with capos in general, but some are better than others. Schubb capos in particular don't get in the way as much. They aren't super expensive either, only $20 or so.

If it's still buzzing even with the capo right by the fret, then it's either a problem with the capo or a problem with your guitar's setup. If you know how to play barre chords try just barring that same fret with your finger. If the problem doesn't happen when you barre it with your finger but does happen with the capo, then you will know it's a bad capo.