#1
Jimmy Page, Brian May and David Gilmour use?

Like does anyone actually know as oppose to the standard probably this and that answer?

More than that does anyone know what keys in regards to jimmy page he favoured more than others?
#2
Sure, they favoured major, minor and pentatonic scales.

Jimmy Page doesn't favour certain keys, the key of a song is usually determined by the singer's vocal range. It's no biggy either way, all major keys sound the same, all minor keys sound the same.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
This is kind of a silly question since different songs use different scales, and unless you know the guys personally you can't exactly tell what key they liked more. Anyway, they all mostly used minor pentatonic/blues scale (like most rock guitarists), occasionally adding in notes of the minor scale, nothing too fancy. For example, Stairway to Heaven mainly uses A minor pentatonic, Comfortably Numb uses Bminor pentatonic and the blues variant. Brian May however likes to use the major scale a lot, occasionally going minor, and both their respected pentatonics.
#4
^Yeah at a certain point the question, while useful, turns into "do you guys know what colors Picasso used?"

All keys sound the same, and it really comes down to the three of them knowing how to play over a key pretty well.

Lots of pentatonic and major/minor scales though. Maybe harmonic minor every so often.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Jimmy Page would use minor & major pentatonic. He also had a habit of throwing in a 2 (or a 9, depending on context) for the sake of color.
#6
Quote by PinkZepStones
Jimmy Page, Brian May and David Gilmour use?

Like does anyone actually know as oppose to the standard probably this and that answer?

More than that does anyone know what keys in regards to jimmy page he favoured more than others?



Minor Pentatonic, Blues scales and an awareness of chord tones when they'd play a lick.

For example, in A Minor Pentatonic, A C D E G, in the opening lead to Stairway to Heaven, you'll notice, that the lick stops on the 5th string 8th fret, and technically that's not in the A Pentatonic Minor scale, as it's an F note, but the chord that's playing at the end of that phrase, is also an F - this is what I mean by being aware of chord tones, and taget notes.

You could do this easily with any chord, if you know the notes on the neck, and the notes of the chord. It actually can make your soloing ideas more on "point", and simply by targeting each chord tone by approaching it a half step from the target, can add additional color to your licks.

This isn't the idea of "hey I'm using the scales of xyz" it's being HARMONICALLY AWARE.

The number one problem that guys that want to know scales have, is they think all the magic is in the SCALE and not the player. The day you (not YOU, but generically as in anyone) realize and stop chasing the scale, and look at the reason things work, is the day you'll mature musically by about 5 years.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 26, 2015,
#7
^Yeah that.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
Quote by Sean0913
.

The number one problem that guys that want to know scales have, is they think all the magic is in the SCALE and not the player.



I couldn't agree more. Scales are only a collection of pitches, and the same scales can be used for bluegrass as in death metal, or in country and jazz. If you want to make your playing sound more in the vein of Gilmour, Page and May, then the best thing you can do is transcribe some of their songs and after you've learned the song look up what they are doing in regards to theoretical concepts and take that knowledge and apply it to your own playing. Learning the music will give you more vocabulary, learning the theoretical concepts will give you tools to explore new ideas with.

The day you (not YOU, but generically as in anyone) realize and stop chasing the scale, and look at the reason things work, is the day you'll mature musically by about 5 years.


Also agree with this 100%. Scales and speed are the two main things guitarists need to stop chasing in order to improve the most. If you focus on learning songs you like and breaking them down you will learn the scales in the process, and how to actually use them. If you focus on playing everything perfectly, and slowing down to do so, you will become faster as well. Those are the two things players really should stop chasing.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#9
To further the comments above, once you get past "what" they are playing, try figuring out "why" they are playing those specific notes with reference to the key and chord structure.

The "why" is where the magic comes from. Figure that out and you can start making your own.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
I was excited to post here, but it looks like all the bases are covered already, haha. I will add a bit more insight though. When you are beginning to emulate a style, it is really important to just listen to the player A LOT, even when you aren't trying to analyze it. Emotional connection = creative connection, and "feeling" it is the most important part of picking up anything on guitar.
Last edited by Blakechaos at May 27, 2015,
#11
Quote by Sean0913
The number one problem that guys that want to know scales have, is they think all the magic is in the SCALE and not the player. The day you (not YOU, but generically as in anyone) realize and stop chasing the scale, and look at the reason things work, is the day you'll mature musically by about 5 years.
This is honestly why I tell people, "Don't bother with learning millions of scales". I feel that it's more beneficial to learn chord tones and how certain intervals react with certain chords. The sound of certain notes over certain chords...knowledge of that is what sets a good player apart from a bad player.