#1
I want to be a guitar player in a band, but I don't know how to write or arrange my own songs. Is there any benefits to going to a music school as opposed to just learning stuff online.
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#2
Well. If you're really thinking about a music college, like literally a college for music, I don't think that you really understand what that entails if you have to make that question. If you want to become a professional musician, like work as a session guitarist or a producer, you should consider getting a degree at music. If you, however, are looking to just play with your band you should probably just look at guitar lessons, or go to an after school type academy.

Do you want to devote your life to music? Are you looking forward to getting a day job in the music industry? Do you want to become a studio/live musician for hire? Or maybe even a producer or a sound tech guy? If that's what you want a musical college might be the way to go. If you want to become a rockstar, you should probably get some lessons, work with your band and get a day job that actually makes money.
#3
No.

But you could find a great guitar teacher and take lessons.
"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. This is my religion." -- Abraham Lincoln
#4
Quote by Kevätuhri
Well. If you're really thinking about a music college, like literally a college for music, I don't think that you really understand what that entails if you have to make that question. If you want to become a professional musician, like work as a session guitarist or a producer, you should consider getting a degree at music. If you, however, are looking to just play with your band you should probably just look at guitar lessons, or go to an after school type academy.

Do you want to devote your life to music? Are you looking forward to getting a day job in the music industry? Do you want to become a studio/live musician for hire? Or maybe even a producer or a sound tech guy? If that's what you want a musical college might be the way to go. If you want to become a rockstar, you should probably get some lessons, work with your band and get a day job that actually makes money.


Pretty much this
#5
A college with a BM (Bacholors in Music) degree program is not for beginners with no formal music background. Most colleges with a music degree program will require you to actually audition with not only one main instrument but often require you know how to play more than one instrument proficiently. From Wiki:

"Bachelor of Music (B.M., B.Mus., Mus.B. or Mus.Bac.) is an academic degree awarded by a college, university, or conservatory upon completion of program of study in music. In the United States, it is a professional degree, and the majority of work consists of prescribed music courses and study in applied music, usually requiring proficiency in performing an instrument, voice, or conducting. Programs typically last from three to four and a half years."

"The degree may be awarded for music performance, music education, composition, music theory, musicology / music history (musicology degrees may be a Bachelor of Arts (BA) rather than a BMus) music technology, music therapy, music ministry, music business, music entertainment, music production or jazz studies. Recently, some universities have begun offering degrees in Music Composition with Technology, which encompasses traditional theory and musicology coursework, but also adds the element of engineering in a studio, and becoming proficient at full-scale studio production."

If you just want to play guitar and join a band this may be a little much but if you want to work as a professional musician, arranger, studio tech or music teacher go for it.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 26, 2015,
#6
Wait so you have to be a professional musician before going to a music college doesn't that defeat the purpose of it. And yes making a living as a musician is my main goal. I want to be able to play music, produce music and possibly be a guitar teacher.
Quote by MeTallIcA313
Guys, you heard Mr. Sacamano. No fun until racism is over.
#7
When you go to college for anything you need a certain amount of knowledge before being accepted in any program. You need to have a certain level of skills in math, English composition, history and the skills you just learned (or were supposed to) in grammar school and high school. That's why you take SAT tests to get into a college, because if you don't already have those skills they won't accept you. If you want to get accepted to a school for a college level math program you need to be really good at math or whatever your chosen field. They don't start you from 1+1=2. The same with a music program. You should take any and all music programs available to you in high school or study with a good teacher who can get you to that entry level before even thinking about a music college.

I'm not trying to be negative and I wish you luck and hope you get where you want to be.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 26, 2015,
#8
Best advice I was ever given on the matter:
FOLLOW THE MONEY

Think about it. Say you have a liberal arts degree in some music study right now what are you gonna do with it? what jobs are you going to apply for? Its a noble thought to wanna make a hobby a living but you have to consider its practicality. I say don't settle for an arts degree in music, if you wanna work in the industry however look into something more worthwhile like audio engineering or even electronics. That way you can have a job, have a decent income and still have the option to just play for a living should the opportunity come.

Just my 2 cents
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#9
Quote by hurricane0202
Wait so you have to be a professional musician before going to a music college doesn't that defeat the purpose of it. .


You need to be a capable musician already, it is equivalent to that if you want to get into law school or study medicine you need to have done certain courses in high school and have a good grade in those classes to get in. They need you to do this audition and prove yourself so that they know you have a good basis to work from and that you are serious about developing as a musician, most music colleges get several hundred people that audition and they have to narrow it down to a few.

For example, way back when i was first auditioning for music college i was 1 out of 70 total guitarists, and they let maybe 2-5 get into the program i applied to. Needless to say, i didn't get in the first time, so i had to study two years at a "pre-college" music school before i got in, since the competition is really hard.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#10
Sickz is right. My best friend in high school was also the best musician in my high school. When it came time to apply to a college that had a music program he had to audition. He was a horn player (trombone and trumpet). He failed his first audition and spent the next year or so taking piano lessons several times a week (he already played decent but did not read piano music at a pro level.). When he went to a 2nd audition he presented himself as a horn player again and a piano player. He got in and went on to get a Masters degree in music. After college he worked as a session player for a number of years and a "pit" musician in New York City for Broadway shows. He also was a sub music teacher in high schools. Eventually he became a full time music teacher at a community college but it was nice he had that to fall back on when the when the studio work dropped off.

If you want to make music a career you have to be serious about studying music at a pro level. Being the best musician in town doesn't guarantee you a seat in a college music program.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 26, 2015,
#11
Ok, well I know very little music theory so I guess it's gonna be a while before I can think I'm ready for a music college. The only two Instruments I can play is guitar and little bit of piano. I'm still wanting to but im guessing it's gonna be years before I know all I need to know. I might just go to a regular college and get into a music class to get me going.
Quote by MeTallIcA313
Guys, you heard Mr. Sacamano. No fun until racism is over.
#12
Call up your buddies, the guy with the drum set and the other guy with the bass guitar.

Start a band with a cool name.

Take the three chords you know and come up with a song. Put some catchy lyrics on top.

If it's country music make sure you include some of the following words in your song: Beer, truck, girls, drinking, tires, mud, honky-tonk. Learn a passable southern accent to sing with.

For pop music do some rapping in the song. Also high pitched screaming or very low cookie monster type vocals. Fire your friends the bassist and drummer and use samples instead. Don't forget to use auto-tune and tattoo yourself.

Use pentatonics in your song. Shred is dead.

Get a hot chick singer and hot chick dancers if you can.

Music school? No.
"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. This is my religion." -- Abraham Lincoln
#13
I would have loved going to a music school, but I have no formal training. I can decipher sheet music, but I always considered training your ear to be a better use of time. Because of this my sight reading is horrid, and it really seems like a skill you're gonna have to have in a music college. It is this very skill I think will keep most musicians from entering the college. General theory probably not so much, but sight reading is really hard to make yourself practice if you don't have to have it and can learn things by ear or even tab much easier.
#14
I agree totally about sight reading. I learned to sight read music when I first started playing (I started with trumpet and piano and was never really good at either. I too found that after a few years of playing mostly by just figuring out songs and developing a good ear for music my reading skills were totally neglected. It's a skill you need to practice on a regular basis if you want to be good at it. I haven't had a need to do that in many, many years of playing because like you I am good at just playing by ear but I know that anyone seriously interested in a college level music degree must be very good at sight reading and other skills.

It's like the old joke about a grungy looking sax player who shows up for a studio session gig and the snotty arranger looks at him as he handing him some sheet music and says, "I'm assuming you do read music?" and he says, "Yeah, but not enough to let it affect my playing".
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 27, 2015,
#15
I would recommend getting a great teacher.

Trust me from my personal experience. There are two types of teachers: Those that can teach and those that can't.

My first teacher was the latter, and I felt in a rut when I quit lessons in spring 2014. Sure, I could play decently, had decent technique, but my timing was a bit off and my improv was mediocre at best. It involved a lot of frustration, and it basically felt like I was "self-taught with weekly jam sessions."

My current teacher (whom I started lessons from 3 months ago) has already taken my current level and pushed me a lot. I've improved a lot in the past 3 months than I did in 4 years with my past teacher.
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