#1
Hollow Body Sides: Mostly Laminated?

In general do most semi-hollow/hollow body guitars have laminated sides? Are there any good examples that have solid sides?

Would there ever be a semi-hollow/hollow body guitar that has a laminated top/back but has solid sides?

Thanks.
#2
There have been examples of solid wood in the past, but those haven't worked so well. They simply feedback too much.
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#3
Most electrics have solid sides. Where acustic have a laminated peice bent around the shape of the body electrics are a solid block with pockets machined out and a top glued over.
#4
Quote by bachfantasia
Hollow Body Sides: Mostly Laminated?

In general do most semi-hollow/hollow body guitars have laminated sides? Are there any good examples that have solid sides?

Would there ever be a semi-hollow/hollow body guitar that has a laminated top/back but has solid sides?


There are a lot of both.
If we're talking semi-hollows on the order of an ES-335 (or similar), there are guitars that are laminated tops and bottoms (formed via heat/steam) and there are guitars that are CNC carved from chunks of wood. Gibson has both versions in the shrunken-335 style (I've forgotten between the 336 and the 339 which is which). They've also got the flat top Midtown series, which LOOK Like a 335 in a photograph, and that have the same general body shape and paint job, but which have a back and sides that have been hollowed out from a single chunk of mahogany and a flat top that's been glued onto the back/sides. Carvin makes the SH series of guitars, for example, that have a CNC-carved mahogany back and a top carved out of a 2" chunk of figured maple.

If you're talking laminated vs. solid as in acoustic guitars -- generally speaking the tops are single thickness spruce/cedar, etc. with either solid or laminated wood sides and back. But that's not necessarily true when it comes to archtops, which can have a laminated top and solid sides/back.
#5
Quote by dspellman
There are a lot of both.
If we're talking semi-hollows on the order of an ES-335 (or similar), there are guitars that are laminated tops and bottoms (formed via heat/steam) and there are guitars that are CNC carved from chunks of wood. Gibson has both versions in the shrunken-335 style (I've forgotten between the 336 and the 339 which is which). They've also got the flat top Midtown series, which LOOK Like a 335 in a photograph, and that have the same general body shape and paint job, but which have a back and sides that have been hollowed out from a single chunk of mahogany and a flat top that's been glued onto the back/sides. Carvin makes the SH series of guitars, for example, that have a CNC-carved mahogany back and a top carved out of a 2" chunk of figured maple.

If you're talking laminated vs. solid as in acoustic guitars -- generally speaking the tops are single thickness spruce/cedar, etc. with either solid or laminated wood sides and back. But that's not necessarily true when it comes to archtops, which can have a laminated top and solid sides/back.



Hmmmm... What about the backs? How often will you find Laminate tops and sides with a solid back? Like the M75 Aristocrat
#6
^ Not very often I'd have thought. I wasn't even aware there were any until you linked to that Guild Good spot.

Pretty much what dspellman aid, there are a lot of both these days.
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#7
A laminate is (usually) stronger, so it makes for a sturdier/less prone to damage guitar. It is also a bit cheaper, in that the builder does not have to find one really nice piece of the appropriate wood if the guitar uses a laminated back/sides/top. But as others have said, there are plenty of both out there.
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